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I have a web page with three dropdowns for day, month and year. If I use the JavaScript Date constructor that takes numbers then I get a Date object for my current timezone:

new Date(xiYear, xiMonth, xiDate)

Give the correct date but it thinks that date is GMT+01:00 due to daylight savings time.

The problem here is that I then give this Date to an Ajax method and when the date is deserialised on the server it has been converted to GMT and so lost an hour which moves the day back by one. Now I could just pass the day, month, and year individually into the Ajax method but it seems that there ought to be a better way.

The accepted answer pointed me in the right direction, however just using setUTCHours by itself changed:

Apr 5th 00:00 GMT+01:00 

to

Apr 4th 23:00 GMT+01:00

I then also had to set the UTC date, month and year to end up with

Apr 5th 01:00 GMT+01:00

which is what I wanted

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8 Answers 8

up vote 171 down vote accepted

using .setUTCHours() it would be possible to actually set dates in UTC-time, which would allow you to use UTC-times throughout the system.

You cannot set it using UTC in the constructor though, unless you specify a date-string.

Using new Date(Date.UTC(year, month, day, hour, minute, second)) you can create a Date-object from a specific UTC time.

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11  
+1 for the edited answer –  Bryan Matthews Jun 10 '10 at 19:52
39  
The "new Date(Date.UTC(...))" syntax allows you to create a date which is equivalent to a UTC date in terms of the point in time that it represents, but it is not the same - it has a different (non UTC) time zone. –  Anthony Dec 6 '11 at 16:22
10  
Keep in mind that when using "Date" the "month"-value has a range from 0-11 (not 1-12). I kept getting a timezone-offset of 2h (while it should have been 1h) and it took me hours to find out that the reason was a wrong month. –  Select0r Feb 28 '12 at 14:17
1  
This answer is great. But i am using a library [datepicker ui] that is using new Date at many places. All I want is to set the UTC timezone and every date is as per new timezone. I am surprised Javascript doesn't have nothing for this. –  Sanjeev Kumar Dangi Aug 16 '12 at 6:48
1  
Nothing stops you from taking in a "time zone" as a separate parameter and handle it yourself. A Date object i js is always represented as "local" time, you can just choose to set it from a different timezone, but toString() will still show it as the appropriate local time. –  jishi Aug 17 '12 at 8:20
var d = new Date(xiYear, xiMonth, xiDate);
d.setTime( d.getTime() + d.getTimezoneOffset()*60*1000 );

When this date object is deserialized, in most cases you will get the information you expect. My answer's a bit late (by 4 years, looks like) but that's the nature of the interwebs. I see no reason why this wouldn't have worked when the original question was posted, though, and I'm surprised at the complexity of the accepted answer.

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11  
it boggles my mind that javascript is so stupid about this. just give me a date without any time(zone) associated! –  Stephen C Jun 20 '13 at 19:20
2  
Thanks for this answer! :) –  David Da Silva Contín Jan 26 at 16:34
1  
you could just do *60000 instead of *60*1000 :) –  gthmb Feb 26 at 9:11
11  
@gthmb of course, but I feel that *60*1000 is clearer in this case; in other words, it is fairly self-evident why it is there. –  T.W.R.Cole Mar 3 at 23:37
5  
This almost works for me, except I have to use - (minus) instead of + (plus) to get the right time for my time zone. –  Wytze Mar 17 at 11:38

I believe you need the createDateAsUTC function (please compare with convertDateToUTC)

function createDateAsUTC(date) {
    return new Date(Date.UTC(date.getFullYear(), date.getMonth(), date.getDate(), date.getHours(), date.getMinutes(), date.getSeconds()));
    }

function convertDateToUTC(date) { 
    return new Date(date.getUTCFullYear(), date.getUTCMonth(), date.getUTCDate(), date.getUTCHours(), date.getUTCMinutes(), date.getUTCSeconds()); 
    }
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2  
I am amazed about his answer clarity and helpfulness. Did not know that working with Javascript dates was such a nightmare until today :S –  will824 Feb 12 at 17:00

I don't believe this is possible - there is no ability to set the timezone on a Date object after it is created.

And in a way this makes sense - conceptually (if perhaps not in implementation); per http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_timestamp (emphasis mine):

Unix time, or POSIX time, is a system for describing instants in time, defined as the number of seconds elapsed since midnight Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) of Thursday, January 1, 1970.

Once you've constructed one it will represent a certain point in "real" time. The time zone is only relevant when you want to convert that abstract time point into a human-readable string.

Thus it makes sense you would only be able to change the actual time the Date represents in the constructor. Sadly it seems that there is no way to pass in an explicit timezone - and the constructor you are calling (arguably correctly) translates your "local" time variables into GMT when it stores them canonically - so there is no way to use the int, int, int constructor for GMT times.

On the plus side, it's trivial to just use the constructor that takes a String instead. You don't even have to convert the numeric month into a String (on Firefox at least), so I was hoping a naive implementation would work. However, after trying it out it works successfully in Firefox, Chrome, and Opera but fails in Konqueror ("Invalid Date") , Safari ("Invalid Date") and IE ("NaN"). I suppose you'd just have a lookup array to convert the month to a string, like so:

var months = [ '', 'January', 'February', ..., 'December'];

function createGMTDate(xiYear, xiMonth, xiDate) {
   return new Date(months[xiMonth] + ' ' + xiDate + ', ' + xiYear + ' 00:00:00 GMT');
}
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3  
If there's no way to "set the timezone on a Date object after it is created", are you implying that there's a way to set the timezone on a Date object as it is created? It doesn't look like a js date is "thin wrapper around a number of seconds since the Epoch" - it looks like it's that count of seconds, plus a time zone. –  Anthony Dec 6 '11 at 16:20

If you want to deal with the slightly different, but related, problem of creating a Javascript Date object from year, month, day, ..., including timezone – that is, if you want to parse a string into a Date – then you apparently have to do an infuriatingly complicated dance:

// parseISO8601String : string -> Date
// Parse an ISO-8601 date, including possible timezone,
// into a Javascript Date object.
//
// Test strings: parseISO8601String(x).toISOString()
// "2013-01-31T12:34"              -> "2013-01-31T12:34:00.000Z"
// "2013-01-31T12:34:56"           -> "2013-01-31T12:34:56.000Z"
// "2013-01-31T12:34:56.78"        -> "2013-01-31T12:34:56.780Z"
// "2013-01-31T12:34:56.78+0100"   -> "2013-01-31T11:34:56.780Z"
// "2013-01-31T12:34:56.78+0530"   -> "2013-01-31T07:04:56.780Z"
// "2013-01-31T12:34:56.78-0330"   -> "2013-01-31T16:04:56.780Z"
// "2013-01-31T12:34:56-0330"      -> "2013-01-31T16:04:56.000Z"
// "2013-01-31T12:34:56Z"          -> "2013-01-31T12:34:56.000Z"
function parseISO8601String(dateString) {
    var timebits = /^([0-9]{4})-([0-9]{2})-([0-9]{2})T([0-9]{2}):([0-9]{2})(?::([0-9]*)(\.[0-9]*)?)?(?:([+-])([0-9]{2})([0-9]{2}))?/;
    var m = timebits.exec(dateString);
    var resultDate;
    if (m) {
        var utcdate = Date.UTC(parseInt(m[1]),
                               parseInt(m[2])-1, // months are zero-offset (!)
                               parseInt(m[3]),
                               parseInt(m[4]), parseInt(m[5]), // hh:mm
                               (m[6] && parseInt(m[6]) || 0),  // optional seconds
                               (m[7] && parseFloat(m[7])*1000) || 0); // optional fraction
        // utcdate is milliseconds since the epoch
        if (m[9] && m[10]) {
            var offsetMinutes = parseInt(m[9]) * 60 + parseInt(m[10]);
            utcdate += (m[8] === '+' ? -1 : +1) * offsetMinutes * 60000;
        }
        resultDate = new Date(utcdate);
    } else {
        resultDate = null;
    }
    return resultDate;
}

That is, you create a 'UTC time' using the date without timezone (so you know what locale it's in, namely the UTC 'locale', and it's not defaulted to the local one), and then manually apply the indicated timezone offset.

Wouldn't it have been nice if someone had actually thought about the Javascript date object for more than, oooh, five minutes....

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thanks for the great function! the only thing i would change is add support for the colon in the timezone offset. var timebits = /^([0-9]{4})-([0-9]{2})-([0-9]{2})T([0-9]{2}):([0-9]{2})(?::([0-9]*)(\.[0-9]*)?)‌​?(?:([+-])([0-9]{2}[:]?)([0-9]{2}))?/; –  robnardo Nov 11 '13 at 22:01

any mileage in

var d = new Date(xiYear, xiMonth, xiDate).toLocaleString();
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This seems to do the trick for me (one time zone away from GMT), but since "locale" is not necessarily timezone related, I wouldn't rely on it. –  Wytze Mar 17 at 11:33

Best Solution I have seen from this came from

http://www.codingforums.com/archive/index.php/t-19663.html

Print Time Function

<script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">
//borrowed from echoecho
//http://www.echoecho.com/ubb/viewthread.php?tid=2362&pid=10482&#pid10482
workDate = new Date()
UTCDate = new Date()
UTCDate.setTime(workDate.getTime()+workDate.getTimezoneOffset()*60000)

function printTime(offset) {
    offset++;
    tempDate = new Date()
    tempDate.setTime(UTCDate.getTime()+3600000*(offset))
    timeValue = ((tempDate.getHours()<10) ? ("0"+tempDate.getHours()) : (""+tempDate.getHours()))
    timeValue += ((tempDate.getMinutes()<10) ? ("0"+tempDate.getMinutes()) : tempDate.getMinutes())
    timeValue += " hrs."
    return timeValue
    }
    var now = new Date()
    var seed = now.getTime() % 0xfffffff
    var same = rand(12)
</script>

Banff, Canada:
<script language="JavaScript">document.write(printTime("-7"))</script>

Full Code Example

<html>

<head>
<script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">
//borrowed from echoecho
//http://www.echoecho.com/ubb/viewthread.php?tid=2362&pid=10482&#pid10482
workDate = new Date()
UTCDate = new Date()
UTCDate.setTime(workDate.getTime()+workDate.getTimezoneOffset()*60000)

function printTime(offset) {
offset++;
tempDate = new Date()
tempDate.setTime(UTCDate.getTime()+3600000*(offset))
timeValue = ((tempDate.getHours()<10) ? ("0"+tempDate.getHours()) : (""+tempDate.getHours()))
timeValue += ((tempDate.getMinutes()<10) ? ("0"+tempDate.getMinutes()) : tempDate.getMinutes())
timeValue += " hrs."
return timeValue
}
var now = new Date()
var seed = now.getTime() % 0xfffffff
var same = rand(12)
</script>

</head>

<body>
Banff, Canada:
<script language="JavaScript">document.write(printTime("-7"))</script>
<br>
Michigan:
<script language="JavaScript">document.write(printTime("-5"))</script>
<br>
Greenwich, England(UTC):
<script language="JavaScript">document.write(printTime("-0"))</script>
<br>
Tokyo, Japan:
<script language="JavaScript">document.write(printTime("+9"))</script>
<br>
Berlin, Germany:
<script language="JavaScript">document.write(printTime("+1"))</script>

</body>
</html>
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Your example excludes Daylight Saving Time. CurrentTime: Fri Oct 04 2013 11:13:43 GMT-0700 (Pacific Daylight Time) UtcTime: Fri, 04 Oct 2013 18:13:43 GMT Banff, Canada: 1213 hrs. Michigan: 1413 hrs. Greenwich, England(UTC): 1913 hrs. Tokyo, Japan: 0413 hrs. Berlin, Germany: 2013 hrs. –  Jeson Martajaya Oct 4 '13 at 18:15

Sugar.js is worth investigating. Here's a blog post about their handling of UTC: http://blog.sugarjs.com/post/31463273939/v1-3-4-better-utc-date-handling.

While it doesn't to everything, it's likely to be much closer than a native Date object.

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