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I have got a question regarding specific situation about using MySQL DB in a closed-source application. Tried to find some answers on this but none of them clearly regarded my specific conditions.

I'm developing some application that uses MySQL DB to stores its data. The application will be sold for money and it has closed source. I won't be distributing MySQL DB with my application, I will tell my customers that they need to download MySQL separately and set it up on their server and then configure my app to use it. When connecting to the MySQL from my app I will be using some other .Net connector (commercial license), not the one provided by MySQL on GPL.

Having all these conditions above, do I (or my customers) need to purchase MySQL commercial license or would the GPL edition be ok?

Thanks, Rafal

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closed as off-topic by JasonMArcher, CRABOLO, Shankar Damodaran, volerag, Soner Gönül Jun 2 at 6:41

  • This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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I think this is a pure legal question (and is not really related to software development, because it is basically about the scope of the GPL), and therefor off-topic on SO. Additionally, those questions can be best answered by a lawyer. –  Bobby Dec 9 '10 at 9:15
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I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is a licensing question. –  JasonMArcher Jun 2 at 2:29

1 Answer 1

This is a topic people disagree a lot about. According to Free Software Foundation interpretation of GPL, your customers should obtain commercial licenses. Others say it is not the case. See the discussion here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNU_General_Public_License#Communicating_and_bundling_with_non-GPL_programs

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