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Obviously I dont get the way grep works in R. If I use grep on my OS X terminal, I am able to use the parameter -o which makes grep only return the matching part. In R, I can't find how to do a corresponding thing. Reading the manual I thought values was the right approach, which is better inasmuch that it returns characters not indexes, but still returns the whole string.

# some string  fasdjlk465öfsdj123 
# R
test <-  fasdjlk465öfsdj123 
grep("[0-9]",test,value=TRUE) # returns  "fasdjlk465öfsdj123"

# shell
grep -o '[0-9]' fasdjlk465öfsdj123
# returns 4 6 5 1 2 3

What's the parameter I am missing in R ?

EDIT: Joris Meys' suggestions comes really close to what I am trying to do. I get a vector as a result of readLines. And I'd like to check every element of the vector for numbers and return these numbers. I am really surprised there's no standard solution for that. I thought of using some regexp function that works on a string and returns the match like grep -o and then use lapply on that vector. grep.custom comes closest – i'll try to make that work for me.

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Hmm, isn't calling some shell grep easier? How do I do that again? –  Matt Bannert Dec 9 '10 at 13:12
    
@ran2 : corrected my name :-) –  Joris Meys Dec 9 '10 at 13:13
    
oups, sorry sir! I will double-check that I write at least your name correctly next time you help me ;) –  Matt Bannert Dec 9 '10 at 13:17
1  
@ran2 : updated my answer for vectors. Or, if you want to use the shell grep, you could look at ?sys. Running windows here, so no chance of trying it out, but I'm sure you'll puzzle it out yourself. –  Joris Meys Dec 9 '10 at 13:20
    
... should be ?system in case somebody else is interested –  Matt Bannert Dec 9 '10 at 14:07

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Spacedman said it already. If you really want to simulate grep in the shell, you have to work on the characters itself, using strsplit() :

> chartest <- unlist(strsplit(test,""))
> chartest
 [1] "f" "a" "s" "d" "j" "l" "k" "4" "6" "5" "ö" "f" "s" "d" "j" "1" "2" "3"
> grep("[0-9]",chartest,value=T)
[1] "4" "6" "5" "1" "2" "3"

EDIT :

As Nico said, if you want to do this for complete regular expressions, you need to use the gregexpr() and substr(). I'd make a custom function like this one :

grep.custom <- function(x,pattern){
    strt <- gregexpr(pattern,x)[[1]]
    lngth <- attributes(strt)$match.length
    stp <- strt + lngth - 1
    apply(cbind(strt,stp),1,function(i){substr(x,i[1],i[2])})
}

Then :

> grep.custom(test,"sd")
[1] "sd" "sd"
> grep.custom(test,"[0-9]")
[1] "4" "6" "5" "1" "2" "3"
> grep.custom(test,"[a-z]s[a-z]")
[1] "asd" "fsd"

EDIT2 :

for vectors, use the function Vectorize(), eg:

> X <- c("sq25dfgj","sqd265jfm","qs55d26fjm" )
> v.grep.custom <- Vectorize(grep.custom)
> v.grep.custom(X,"[0-9]+")
$sq25dfgj
[1] "25"

$sqd265jfm
[1] "265"

$qs55d26fjm
[1] "55" "26"

and if you want to call grep from the shell, see ?system

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That does not work if you want to match more than one character. You should really use gregexpr, see my answer for an example. –  nico Dec 9 '10 at 12:20
    
@nico : answer updated –  Joris Meys Dec 9 '10 at 12:35
    
that's pretty close, just edited my post. Thx for the help, I will try to make it work for me... –  Matt Bannert Dec 9 '10 at 13:10
    
I could not upvote twice, but at least I can accepted this answer. Did not know about Vectorize. There's still a lot to learn... –  Matt Bannert Dec 9 '10 at 13:30

That's because 'grep' for R works on vectors - it will do the search on every element and return the element indices that match. It says 'which elements in this vector match this pattern?' For example, here we make a vector of 3 and then ask 'which elements in this vector have a single number in them?'

> test = c("fasdjlk465öfsdj123","nonumbers","123")
> grep("[0-9]",test)
[1] 1 3

Elements 1 and 3 - not 2, which is only characters.

You probably want gsub - substitute anything that doesn't match digits with nothing:

> gsub("[^0-9]","",test)
[1] "465123" ""       "123" 
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1  
+1 for gsub. In my case two sequential gsubs indeed did the job. Obviously there's no single good solution, but several ways to do it... –  Matt Bannert Dec 9 '10 at 13:28
    
@ran2 : hehe, you could have found that out earlier, and for the problem you subscribe in the edit, this might well be the cleanest solution. The thing is that, as the solution I gave initially, it only works for very simple cases. For more complex regular expressions you need more. See also the answer of @nico, he's right on. –  Joris Meys Dec 9 '10 at 13:30
    
@Joris Meys: finding something that works for now is one thing, but learning from the different solutions is the other. –  Matt Bannert Dec 9 '10 at 13:33

All this dancing around with strings is the problem the stringr package was designed to solve.

library(stringr)
str_extract_all('fasdjlk465fsdj123', '[0-9]')

[[1]]
[1] "4" "6" "5" "1" "2" "3"

# It is vectorized too
str_extract_all(rep('fasdjlk465fsdj123',3), '[0-9]')

[[1]]
[1] "4" "6" "5" "1" "2" "3"

[[2]]
[1] "4" "6" "5" "1" "2" "3"

[[3]]
[1] "4" "6" "5" "1" "2" "3"

The motivation behind stringr is to unify string operations in R under two principles:

  • Use a sane and consistent naming scheme for functions (str_do_something).

  • Make it so that all the string operations that take one step in other programing languages, yet fifty steps in R, take only one step in R.

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Nice summary! Thanks –  hadley Dec 11 '10 at 3:35

No idea where you get the impression that

> test <- "fasdjlk465öfsdj123"
> grep("[0-9]",test)
[1] 1

returns "fasdjlk465öfsdj123"

If you want to return the matches, you need to break test into it's component parts, grep on those and then use the thing returned from grep to index test.

> test <- strsplit("fasdjlk465öfsdj123", "")[[1]]
> matched <- grep("[0-9]", test)
> test[matched]
[1] "4" "6" "5" "1" "2" "3"

Or just return the matched strings directly, depends what you want:

> grep("[0-9]", test, value = TRUE)
[1] "4" "6" "5" "1" "2" "3"
share|improve this answer
    
sry, edited my post, forgot value=TRUE. That's why I got the idea. –  Matt Bannert Dec 9 '10 at 12:53
    
apparently we had the same idea at the same time. +1 –  Joris Meys Dec 9 '10 at 14:01
    
@Joris: it would appear so, but you win for using unlist()! +1 –  Gavin Simpson Dec 9 '10 at 14:12

grep will only tell you whether the string matches or not.

For instance if you have:

values <- c("abcde", "12345", "abc123", "123abc")

Then

grep <- ("[0-9]", values)
[1] 2 3 4

This tells you that elements 2,3 and 4 of the array match the regexp. You can pass value=TRUE to return the strings rather then the indices.

If you want to check where the match is happening you can use regexpr instead

> regexpr("[0-9]", values)
[1] -1  1  4  1
attr(,"match.length")
[1] -1  1  1  1

which tells you where the first match is happening.

Even better, you can use gregexpr for multiple matches

> gregexpr("[0-9]", values)
[[1]]
[1] -1
attr(,"match.length")
[1] -1

[[2]]
[1] 1 2 3 4 5
attr(,"match.length")
[1] 1 1 1 1 1

[[3]]
[1] 4 5 6
attr(,"match.length")
[1] 1 1 1

[[4]]
[1] 1 2 3
attr(,"match.length")
[1] 1 1 1
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+1 for gregexpr –  Joris Meys Dec 9 '10 at 12:38

strapply in the gsubfn package can do such extraction:

> library(gsubfn)
> strapply(c("ab34de123", "55x65"), "\\d+", as.numeric, simplify = TRUE)
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]   34   55
[2,]  123   65

Its based on the apply paradigm where the first argument is the object, the second is the modifier (margin for apply, regular expression for strapply) and the third argument is the function to apply on the matches.

str_extract_all(obj, re) in the stringr package is similar to strapply specialized to use c for the function, i.e. its the similar to strapply(obj, re, c) .

strapply supports the sets of regular expressions supported by R and also supports tcl regular expressions.

See the gsubfn home page at http://gsubfn.googlecode.com

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