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I need to find the fastest equivalence of the following C code.

int d = 1 << x; /* d=pow(2,x) */
int j = 2*d*(i / d) + (i % d);

What I thought is to shift left upper 32 - x bits of i.
For example the following i with x=5:
1010 1010 1010 1010
will become:
0101 0101 0100 1010
Is there an assembly command for that? How can I perform this operation fast?

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4  
You should be using unsigned, not int. Your example has undefined behavior with signed values (overflow). –  R.. Dec 9 '10 at 14:14
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5 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

divisions are slow:

int m = (1 << x) - 1;
int j = (i << 1) - (i & m);

update:

or probably faster:

int j = i + (i & (~0 << x));
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1  
That's a really good one. –  FrankH. Dec 9 '10 at 12:23
1  
Very good. I completely missed the mathematical aspect that gives the best optimisation there. –  AlastairG Dec 9 '10 at 13:30
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x86 32bit assembly (AT&T syntax):

/* int MaskedShiftByOne(int val, int lowest_bit_to_shift) */
mov 8(%esp), %ecx
mov $1, %eax
shl %ecx, %eax            ; does 1 << lowest_bit_to_shift
mov 4(%esp), %ecx
dec %eax                  ; (1 << ...) - 1 == 0xf..f (lower bitmask)
mov %eax, %edx
not %edx                  ; complement - higher mask
and %ecx, %edx            ; higher bits
and %ecx, %eax            ; lower bits
lea (%eax, %edx, 2), %eax ; low + 2 * high
ret

This should work both on Linux and Windows.

Edit: the i + (i & (~0 << x)) is shorter:

mov 4(%esp), %ecx
mov $-1, %eax
mov 8(%esp), %edx
shl %edx, %eax
and %ecx, %eax
add %ecx, %eax
ret

Morale: Don't ever start with assembly. If you really need it, disassemble highly-optimized compiler output ...

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1  
+1 for the morale –  Artium Dec 9 '10 at 12:46
1  
+1 for lea :) –  ruslik Dec 9 '10 at 12:53
    
thx & thx to you ;-) –  FrankH. Dec 9 '10 at 13:49
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Shift left by one upper x bits.

unsigned i = 0xAAAAu;
int x = 5;
i = (i & ((1 << x) - 1)) | ((i & ~((1 << x) - 1)) << 1); // 0x1554A;

Some explanations:

(1 << x) - 1 makes a mask to zero upper 32 - x bits.

~((1 << x) - 1) makes a mask to zero lower x bits.

After bits a zeroed we shift the upper part and or them together.

Try this on Codepad.

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Thanks for showing me Codepad –  Robert Dec 9 '10 at 12:06
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int m = (1 << x) - 1;
int j = ((i & ~m) << 1) | (i & m);

There is no assembly command to do what you want, but the solution I give is quicker since it avoids the division.

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1  
Beaten to it by a few seconds :) I think mine is slightly quicker though as it avoids calculating ((1<<x)-1) twice. –  AlastairG Dec 9 '10 at 12:03
2  
I think the optimizer would take care of that. Yours is cleaner though =) –  detunized Dec 9 '10 at 12:06
    
Yeah, you're right about the optimizer. Even though I know compilers can optimise code like crazy, I've been programming for long enough that I still keep hand optimising code here and there. Not all bad though as it does generally tend to cleaner code. –  AlastairG Dec 9 '10 at 13:31
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Intel syntax:

mov ecx,[esp+4]      ;ecx = x
mov eax,[esp+8]      ;eax = i

ror eax,cl
inc cl
clc
rcl eax,cl
ret

Moral: Highly-optimized compiler output... isn't.

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