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In our code we usually use the following pattern:

Connection conn;
try{
    conn = getConnection();
    //Do databasey stuff
}catch(Exceptions that get thrown){
}finally{
    try{
        conn.close();
    }catch(SQLException ex){
        logger.error("Failed to cleanup database connection",ex);
    }
}

However findbugs doesn't like this. Since conn.close() can throw an exception then the connection isn't guaranteed to be closed. Is findbugs being too pedantic or is there a better way to close database connections.

Edit: Added removed try catch around close.

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1  
-1 So put the try catch back in. Editing it for brevity should be non-substantial. Does your code validator have a problem with the uncaught exception or the connection not guaranteed to be closed? –  Erick Robertson Dec 9 '10 at 13:02
    
Have added the try catch. Findbugs has issues with the above because, if an exception is thrown during conn.close() the connection will (presumably) remain open. –  Jim Dec 9 '10 at 13:07
    
javac should be complaining about that code. If you do something daft, say, assign conn with null, then you have a potential NPE. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 9 '10 at 13:24
    
@Jim I suggest you look at my answer since I think it is a better one than the one you have currently selected. –  ArtB Sep 15 '11 at 14:29

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

What you really want to be doing is to combine "The Elite Gentleman"'s answer with the @edu.umd.cs.findbugs.annotations.SuppressWarnings( "OBL_UNSATISFIED_OBLIGATION" ) annotation. FindBugs seems to only be happy if you the complete closing in method in the following manner (which is btw the preferred sequence for doing so):

...
}finally{
    try{ 
       resultSet.close();
    }catch( SqlException e ){
       //log error
    }finally{
       try{
          statement.close();
       }catch( SqlException e ){
          //log error
       }finally{
          try{
              connection.close();
          }catch( SqlException e ){
              //log error
          }
       }
    }
}

Which is very verbose and you probably don't want to do if for no other reason than the love of your carpal tunnel, thus you should use the DBUtils.closeQuietly() method (or create your own, your call). However, FindBugs doesn't recognise this (i.e. using the library or your own method) as properly closing the resources and issues you a warning. In this case it is clearly a false positive. Therefore must make sure its the only warning you are getting and then disable that specific warning for that method.

@edu.umd.cs.findbugs.annotations.SuppressWarnings( "OBL_UNSATISFIED_OBLIGATION" )
public void doStuff( final Connection connection ){
    try{
        //Do databasey stuff
    }catch( SqlException e ){
        //throw a glorious exception....
    }finally{
        DbUtils.closeQuietly( resultSet  );
        DbUtils.closeQuietly( statement  );
        DbUtils.closeQuietly( connection );
}

This way you clean up your resources with the few lines of code and avoid a FindBugs warning.

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1  
+1 for adding annotations. –  Buhake Sindi Sep 5 '11 at 5:18

There's already a utility that does what @duffymo mentioned: DbUtils from Apache.

  • DbUtils.close(ResultSet);
  • DbUtils.close(Statement);
  • DbUtils.close(Connection);

The APIDocs shows all available methods.


Update

Here's an example:

import org.apache.commons.dbutils;


Connection conn;
try{
    conn = getConnection();
    //Do databasey stuff
} catch(Exception e){
    //throw a glorious exception....
} finally{
    DbUtils.closeQuietly(conn); //This hides the SQLException thrown by conn.close();
    //or 
    //DbUtils.close(conn);
}

Update: As suggested by ArtB, if you're finally closing resources and connections and findBugs is being a nagger, you can add the following annotation (on top of the method).

@edu.umd.cs.findbugs.annotations.SuppressWarnings("OBL_UNSATISFIED_OBLIGATION")
share|improve this answer
    
Not from me; I gave it a one-up. I got downvoted as well. –  duffymo Dec 9 '10 at 14:04
    
@duffymo, it's amazing why there's downvotes without explanation. –  Buhake Sindi Dec 9 '10 at 14:10
    
I think it should be banned actually. –  EJP Dec 10 '10 at 5:27
    
FindBugs still seems to complain if you use DBUtils to do the closing. –  ArtB Aug 17 '11 at 19:27
    
@ArtB, are you closing the connection quietly or simple close (with caught exceptions) with DBUtil? –  Buhake Sindi Aug 18 '11 at 5:46

Yes, there's a better way.

Create a static method that wraps the close in a try/catch:

public class DatabaseUtils
{
    public static void close(Connection c)
    {
        try
        {
            if (c != null)
            {
                c.close();
            }
        }
        catch (SQLException e)
        {
            // print or log stack trace
        }
    }

    // same for Statement and ResultSet
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is of course neater as it reduces repeatedly catching wherever connections are used. However I'm sure findbugs will still not be happy as an exception in the close will mean this remains open. –  Jim Dec 9 '10 at 13:09
    
// print or log stack trace No, you should be throwing an exception (possible SQLException). –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 9 '10 at 13:25
    
You don't necessarily want to throw an exception. While failing to close a connection is annoying it shouldn't necessarily cause things like transaction rollbacks. –  Jim Dec 9 '10 at 13:31
1  
@Tom Hawtin - no, the whole point of this method is to prevent the exception from getting out. You've misunderstood the question. –  duffymo Dec 9 '10 at 13:55

Yes, you should encapsulate your close in a try block, but there is a cleverer way.

try {
    Connection c = getConnection();
    try {
        //do stuff
    } finally {
        c.close();
    }
} catch (SQLException e) {
    //Catch exceptions
}
share|improve this answer
1  
That's not "cleverer[sic]"; if an exception is thrown the connection will leak. –  Lawrence Dol Dec 9 '10 at 14:25
    
Correct me if I'm wrong, but the finally block will still run if an exception is thrown in the inner try block. The only way the "connection will leak" is if the close statement itself throws an exception. –  yock Dec 9 '10 at 14:55

There isn't really a better way, but if you want to be sure that you catch everything, modify your pattern to this:

Connection conn;
try{
    conn = getConnection();
    //Do databasey stuff
}catch(Exceptions that get thrown){
}finally{
    try {
       conn.close();
    }
    catch  (SQLException se) {
       log.error("database problems...");
       // do more stuff if you need to
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The conn.close is inside a catch, have updated the question to add this. –  Jim Dec 9 '10 at 12:58
    
There clearly is a better way. –  Stephen C Dec 9 '10 at 13:05
    
@Stephen: there is always a better way; it's just not always obvious at first glance. –  darioo Dec 9 '10 at 13:06

You can avoid the whole thing by using something like Spring JDBCTemplate, which properly encapsulates all the open/close logic for you, simplifies your code, makes it cleaner and easier to read (as well as more likely to be correct).

An example, reading some columns from a table into a list of key-value pairs (yeah, ugly, but easy to understand):

        List<Map<String, Object>> resultList = jdbcTemplate.query(query,
                new RowMapper<Map<String, Object>>() {
                    @Override
                    public Map<String, Object> mapRow(ResultSet rs,
                            int rownum) throws SQLException {
                        Map<String, Object> row = new HashMap<String, Object>();
                        int colIndex = 0;
                        row.put(CONTENTID_KEY, rs.getInt(++colIndex));
                        row.put(CONTENTTYPEID_KEY, rs.getInt(++colIndex));
                        row.put(DESCRIPTION_KEY, rs.getString(++colIndex));
                        row.put(CODE_KEY, rs.getString(++colIndex));
                        return row;
                    }
                });

For exception handling, see spring jdbcTemplate how to catch exception?

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