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I would like to play with scala.ref.WeakReference. However, before trying to implement the big thing, I would like to try to check the behavior in scala console. I tried a few thing but I was unable to obtained my object to be dereferenced. Here is one of my tries:

> class A
defined class A

> class B(var value: A)
defined class B

> new B(new A)
res0: B = B@c8aeb3

> new scala.ref.WeakReference(res0.value)
res1: scala.ref.WeakReference[A] = scala.ref.WeakReferenceWithWrapper@16a5d72

> res0.value = new A

> res1.get // Here I hope to get None
res3: Option[A] = Some(A@135707c)

Another try is given by oxbow_lakes below.

I've also tried to explicitly run the garbage collector (calling java.lang.System.gc) in vain.

Is there any way to dereference the content of res1 ?

share|improve this question
    
As you can see, we're highly confused about what the REPL does, what the REPL says it's doing, and what the REPL is supposed to be doing, and when the GC will skip collecting the unreferenced object. Is there any chance you can write a Scala script in a file that tests the behavior you want, and see if that works, so you don't have to worry about the vagaries of how the REPL prints its result? –  Ken Bloom Dec 9 '10 at 17:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
Welcome to Scala version 2.8.1.final (Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM, Java 1.6.0_22).
Type in expressions to have them evaluated.
Type :help for more information.

scala> class A  
defined class A

scala> class B(var value: A)
defined class B

scala> new B(new A)
res0: B = B@4223d9b

scala> new scala.ref.WeakReference(res0.value)
res1: scala.ref.WeakReference[A] = scala.ref.WeakReferenceWithWrapper@20eb607d

scala> res0.value = new A

scala> System gc

scala> res1 get
res3: Option[A] = None

By the way, if I run it as a script without an explicit System gc, it won’t delete the reference either. So to me it’s not an issue of the REPL but just the way that weak references and the garbage collector work.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: It's definitely an REPL quirk. Your solution just makes it so the REPL doesn't keep a direct reference to the first value of the var that I pointed out in my answer. But the REPL is going to keep a direct reference to the second value you gave res0.value, so you haven't completely solved the problem for experimentation in general. –  Ken Bloom Dec 9 '10 at 16:42
    
Well, I just followed the original question… –  Debilski Dec 9 '10 at 16:45
    
It is not keeping a reference to res0.value because the assignment res0.value = new A returns (). The REPL never sees it actually. If it keeps a reference, it will show you so in the result string. –  Debilski Dec 9 '10 at 16:49
    
If one wants to be sure that no spurious references are kept, one should wrap the code inside some {‌} construct. –  Debilski Dec 9 '10 at 16:51
1  
You're right. The REPL does something different for res0.value = new A than it does for b = new A. In the res0.value case, it doesn't keep a reference. The closure solution is unnecessary (for now at least). –  Ken Bloom Dec 9 '10 at 16:57

Run your code with scala -Xprint:parser and you'll see what's keeping old value of a var referenced even after you reassign it.

I'm going to simplify things here, and just run two lines of code:

var b=1
b=2

And this is what Scala prints:

scala> var b=1
[[syntax trees at end of parser]]// Scala source: <console>
package <empty> {
  object line2$object extends scala.ScalaObject {
    def <init>() = {
      super.<init>();
      ()
    };
    object $iw extends scala.ScalaObject {
      def <init>() = {
        super.<init>();
        ()
      };
      object $iw extends scala.ScalaObject {
        def <init>() = {
          super.<init>();
          ()
        };
        var b = 1                                ///// YOUR CODE HERE
      }
    }
  }
}

[[syntax trees at end of parser]]// Scala source: <console>
package <empty> {                                /////THIS IS AN object
                                                 /////SO PRESUMABLY IT CAN'T BE GC'ED
  object RequestResult$line2$object extends scala.ScalaObject {
    def <init>() = {
      super.<init>();
      ()
    };
    lazy val scala_repl_value = {                 /////THIS LAZY VAL
      scala_repl_result;                          /////WILL REFERENCE THE OLD VALUE
      line2$object.$iw.$iw.b                      /////EVEN AFTER YOU REASSIGN THE var
    };
    val scala_repl_result: String = {
      line2$object.$iw.$iw;
      "".$plus("b: Int = ").$plus(scala.runtime.ScalaRunTime.stringOf(line2$object.$iw.$iw.b))
    }
  }
}

b: Int = 1

scala> b=2
[[syntax trees at end of parser]]// Scala source: <console>
package <empty> {
  object line3$object extends scala.ScalaObject {
    def <init>() = {
      super.<init>();
      ()
    };
    object $iw extends scala.ScalaObject {
      def <init>() = {
        super.<init>();
        ()
      };
      import line2$object.$iw.$iw.b;              ///// I DON'T THINK THIS (ORDINARILY ILLEGAL)
                                                  ///// import CONTRIBUTES TO THE PROBLEM
      object $iw extends scala.ScalaObject {
        def <init>() = {
          super.<init>();
          ()
        };
        b = 2;                                    /////YOUR CODE HERE
        val synthvar$0 = b
      }
    }
  }
}

[[syntax trees at end of parser]]// Scala source: <console>
package <empty> {
  object RequestResult$line3$object extends scala.ScalaObject {
    def <init>() = {
      super.<init>();
      ()
    };
    lazy val scala_repl_value = {
      scala_repl_result;
      line3$object.$iw.$iw.synthvar$0
    };
    val scala_repl_result: String = {
      line3$object.$iw.$iw;
      "".$plus("b: Int = ").$plus(line3$object.$iw.$iw.synthvar$0).$plus("\012")
    }
  }
}

b: Int = 2

EDIT: To add on to Debilski's answer, I think the following solution will let you reassign the variable as many times as you want without the REPL keeping a reference to the old value:

class A
class B{
   var _value:A = new A
   def value = _value
   def pleaseUpdate( closure: B => Unit ) = closure(this)
}

Define your container object as:

val b=new B

And whenever you want to update the variable that's inside it:

b.pleaseUpdate( _._value = new A )
share|improve this answer
    
I can't tell from this, but IIRC when Scala builds a closure over a var it boxes it in a mutable form and everything references the box. That way all the different references see the same updates to the value of the var. So if it's capturing the var I think it would prevent collection of the box despite setting the var to null but not the object it references. But it's been a while since I've looked at that in depth... –  Erik Engbrecht Dec 9 '10 at 16:48
    
@Erik: I guess it depends when scala_repl_value is evaluated. –  Ken Bloom Dec 9 '10 at 17:09

My idea was to use a var explicitly and set to null:

scala> var b = new B(new A)
b: B = B@45033fb5

scala> new scala.ref.WeakReference(b.value)
res0: scala.ref.WeakReference[A] = scala.ref.WeakReferenceWithWrapper@6a7be687

scala> b = null
b: B = null

scala> res0.get
res1: Option[A] = Some(A@79f71773)

It still does not work, though: the REPL is presumably doing stuff under the covers which keeps hold of the reference. I would therefore not advise using it to test the use of References.

share|improve this answer
    
It was one of the other tries. It does not work either. I'm also afraid that the REPL keeps obscure reference to the objects. –  Nicolas Dec 9 '10 at 13:48
1  
Yes - my tests revealed the same. I've kept the answer in for completeness –  oxbow_lakes Dec 9 '10 at 13:51

From Java API docs:

Calling the gc method suggests that the Java Virtual Machine expend effort toward recycling unused objects in order to make the memory they currently occupy available for quick reuse. When control returns from the method call, the Java Virtual Machine has made a best effort to reclaim space from all discarded objects.

In my anecdotal experience this means it rarely triggers a truly complete collection, especially if there is no pressure in terms of available memory. If you put pressure on it, it will be collected. I think you're expecting for more deterministic behavior out of the GC than it provides.

Welcome to Scala version 2.8.0.final (Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM, Java 1.6.0_22).
Type in expressions to have them evaluated.
Type :help for more information.

scala> var s = new String("Hello, world!")         
s: java.lang.String = Hello, world!

scala> import scala.ref.WeakReference
import scala.ref.WeakReference

scala> val w = new WeakReference(s)  
w: scala.ref.WeakReference[java.lang.String] = scala.ref.WeakReferenceWithWrapper@663f3fbd

scala> s = null
s: java.lang.String = null

scala> Array.ofDim[Byte](1024*1024)
res1: Array[Byte] = Array(0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, ...
scala> Array.ofDim[Byte](1024*1024)
res2: Array[Byte] = Array(0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, ...
scala> Array.ofDim[Byte](1024*1024)
res3: Array[Byte] = Array(0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, ...
scala> Array.ofDim[Byte](1024*1024)
res4: Array[Byte] = Array(0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, ...
scala> Array.ofDim[Byte](1024*1024)
res5: Array[Byte] = Array(0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, ...
scala> Array.ofDim[Byte](1024*1024)
res6: Array[Byte] = Array(0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, ...
scala> System.gc

scala> var g = w.get
g: Option[java.lang.String] = None
share|improve this answer
    
Huh??? Either my answer's wrong or your answer's wrong. Take a look at mine and tell me what I'm misunderstanding. –  Ken Bloom Dec 9 '10 at 16:19
    
I take that back. The lazy val that's keeping the old value referenced (in my answer) was added in commit 20631 which appears to be in 2.8.1, but not 2.8.0. –  Ken Bloom Dec 9 '10 at 16:30
    
I can see the same behaviour (as Erik) in 2.7.7, 2.8.0 and 2.8.1. (Although the WeakReference would already be deleted in 2.7.7 without a System.gc – but that might have be a coincidence.) –  Debilski Dec 9 '10 at 16:40
    
There's a lot of non-determinism involved here. Did anyone copy&paste my transcript into a 2.8.1 REPL? I don't have time at the moment to go through the install. –  Erik Engbrecht Dec 9 '10 at 16:44
    
Yes, I did. I thought this was clear from my comment. –  Debilski Dec 9 '10 at 17:00

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