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Is there a shorter version of IF statement to do this?

if (el.type == ElementType.Type1 || el.type == ElementType.Type2)
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3  
This is not "optimization"... And, just out of curiosity, if you could design a shorter version to look like anything that you wanted, what would it be? I have a hard time imagining how that could get any shorter without losing its content. –  Cody Gray Dec 9 '10 at 14:06
4  
Why? It's perfectly plain and easy to understand as it is. Why obfuscate it to save a few bytes of pre-compiled code? –  David Dec 9 '10 at 14:07
    
@Cody Gray: my guess is that Gapipro would want it to look like this: if (el.type == (ElementType.Type1 || ElementType.Type2)) –  Kristof Claes Dec 9 '10 at 14:09
    
Just about the only way to make it shorter would be to move the logic somewhere else, like an extension method... –  cdhowie Dec 9 '10 at 14:09
    
Can you clarify whet you mean by shorter? What would you like to write? –  rds Dec 9 '10 at 14:18

13 Answers 13

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You could use an extension method, but would this really be much better?

Throw this on a static class:

public static bool IsOneOf(this ElementType self, params ElementType[] options)
{
    return options.Contains(self);
}

And then you can do:

if (el.type.IsOneOf(ElementType.Type1, ElementType.Type2)) {

However, this will be a lot slower than your if statement, as there is an implicit array initialization followed by an array traversal, as opposed to (at the most) two compares and branches.

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This is the only real answer to the question. And I agree that it's probably a bad idea. I'd +1 if I wasn't out of votes. –  Cody Gray Dec 9 '10 at 14:15
4  
+1 for the beard –  Dave Markle Dec 9 '10 at 14:20

Consider ElementType is defined as

enum ElementType
{
Type1,
Type2,
Type3
}

In this particular case you may write if(el.type<ElementType3) By default Type1 equals to 0, Type2 equals 1, etc

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7  
You may, but please don't. –  Dave Markle Dec 9 '10 at 14:08
    
This can go wrong so fast... –  Gapipro Dec 9 '10 at 14:30
    
Can go wrong very fast. A workaround could be having the enums with fixed values (Type1 = 1; Type2 = 2; Type3 = 3). It would a bit safer, but still misses the point of using enums instead of integer constants –  t3mujin Dec 9 '10 at 16:20

If you have only 2 values, I strongly suggest to use the code you posted, because is likely the most readable, elegant and fast code possible (IMHO).

But if you have more cases like that and more complicated, you could think to use a switch statement:

switch (el.type)
{
    case ElementType.Type1:
    case ElementType.Type2:
    case ElementType.Type3:
        //code here
        break;
    case ElementType.Type4:
    case ElementType.Type5:
        //code here
        break;
    case ElementType.Type6:
        //code here
        break;
}

that translated in if statements would be:

if (el.type == ElementType.Type1 ||
    el.type == ElementType.Type2 ||
    el.type == ElementType.Type3 )
{
    // code here
}else if(el.type == ElementType.Type4 ||
         el.type == ElementType.Type5)
{
    // code here
}else if(el.type == ElementType.Type6)
{
    // code here
}

They're perfectly equal to me, but the switch seems more readable/clearer, and you need to type less (i.e. it's "shorter" in term of code length) :)

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Is this method faster then mine? –  Gapipro Dec 9 '10 at 14:38
1  
Look at this q&a for the performance implications --> stackoverflow.com/questions/767821/… –  digEmAll Dec 9 '10 at 14:56

You can try this:

if(new [] { ElementType.Type1, ElementType.Type2 }.Contains(el.type))

(turns out, that takes even more characters)

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May be you have problem with counting. –  Saeed Amiri Dec 9 '10 at 14:10
    
I don't think that this is faster version then 2x '==' operation. –  Gapipro Dec 9 '10 at 14:35

I guess you're referring to an IN() clause or some such? Not really... Well, sort of... You can do something like:

if ((new [] { ElementType.Type1, ElementType.Type2}).Contains(el.type)) {...}

But that's not going to be anywhere near as performant (or brief) as what you're already doing. You can also do

if (el.type == ElementType.Type1 | el.type == ElementType.Type2)

but that doesn't do short-circuit evaluation, so you rarely want to use that operator. My advice is to stick with what you have.

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2  
The thought of omitting the second | in order to reduce the character count by 1 while sacrificing the performance benefits of short-circuiting makes me laugh. And then cringe. –  Cody Gray Dec 9 '10 at 14:13
1  
Ha! Hey, he asked how to make it shorter... ;-) I use it so infrequently that my feeble brain only thinks of it as a bitwise operator. –  Dave Markle Dec 9 '10 at 14:19

The brief answer is no. There isn't C# language construct that lets you combine object comparisons. But as many people have mentioned before, creating a collection of your types is probably your best bet in creating a shorter if statement. However that sacrifices quite a bit in the area of performance. I would stick with the OR statement.

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There is no better way to optimize your code. As other users have shown, you can optimize an if else.

But a type of if statement I have thought about, in your case especially, would be

if(X > [Y || Z || A])

But that doesn't exist, and isn't as clean as the current if (X > Y || X > Z || X > A)

(This is more of a response to Cody Gray)

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If this is a common logic comparison in your code that shows up alot I'd just write a method to handle it.

private bool isType1OrType2(ElementType type)
{
    return type == ElementType.Type1 || type == ElementType.Type2;
}

then you can do

if(isType1OrType2(el.type))

You could also make this an extension method like so

public static bool isType1OrType2(this ElementType type)
{
    return type == ElementType.Type1 || type == ElementType.Type2;
}

so the code would read a little nicer

if(el.type.isType1OrType2())

But then you have to have a static class but you can decide if it's worth it. I personally would not write a method to take a collection of types to compare to unless you find that you are comparing the type to many different combinations. I also would not even bother changing the code at all if this is the only place you make this type of comparison.

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i dont think there is a way to optimize your statement

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This is really a comment, not an answer to the question. Please use "add comment" to leave feedback for the author. –  Matthieu Aug 17 '12 at 13:50

In short: nothing reasonable (reasonable in terms of code readability and performance optimisation). I wouldn't recommend the ternary operator for this kind of comparison either.

The actual if can be shortened to 5 characters ;)

bool b = (el.type == ElementType.Type1) | (el.type == ElementType.Type2);

if(b){...}
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2  
Do you have particular basis for the claim that inequality tests (!=) are faster than equality tests (==)? –  Cody Gray Dec 9 '10 at 14:21
    
My apologies, that was rubbish. I just mixed up some stuff I remembered from early Uni ASM and CPU design days. Edited it. I did a quick research again, and it actually doesn't matter if the value to compare fits wholly in one register. Additionally, I learnt that depending on the compiler used, equality can even compare faster on some high level languages. –  Jules Dec 9 '10 at 14:35
    
Yeah, that's because lots of high level languages often define inequality in terms of equality, forcing them to determine equality first. I was just curious if you were thinking of some other language I don't know personally. The real point is that, in the end, the difference is negligible. (And for what it's worth, I think you're still right about any difference being optimized out by the compiler picking the optimal instruction (or, certainly by the JITer in C#). –  Cody Gray Dec 9 '10 at 15:24

Don't do this, it is stupid and confusing unless you have a finite-state automaton.

enum MyEnum
{
    A,
    B,
    C

}
private readonly Dictionary<MyEnum, Action> _handlers = new Dictionary<MyEnum, Action>
                                                        {
    {MyEnum.A,()=>Console.Out.WriteLine("Foo")},
    {MyEnum.B,()=>Console.Out.WriteLine("Bar")},
    };

public static void ActOn(MyEnum e)
{
    Action handler = null;
    if (_handlers.TryGetValue(e, out handler) && handler != null)
    {
        handler();
    }
}
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Another approach would be to do some bitwise comparison, but really not worth it again.

    private void ActWithCast(MyEnum e)
    {
        const int interest = (int)MyEnum.A | (int)MyEnum.B;
        if (0 != ((int)e & interest))
        {
            Console.Out.WriteLine("Blam");
        }
    }
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If the ElementType is an enum there is a shorter way to do it:

[Flags]
public enum ElementType
{
    Type1 = 1,
    Type2 = 2,
    Type3 = 4,
}
...
tElementType.HasFlag(ElementType.Type1 | ElementType.Type2);

You do not need the [Flags] attribute to use HasFlag, but the values of each of them do need to follow that pattern.

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