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We have been using lamda events like this:

bookMarkClient.wmdeleteCompleted += (s, ea) =>
        {
            if (ea.Result = "Success")
            {
                foreach (BookMark bookMark in BookMarks)
                    {
                        if (bookMarkId == bookMark.bm_id)
                        {
                            BookMarks.Remove(bookMark);
                            OnNotifyPropertyChanged("BookMarks");
                            break;
                        }
                    }                
               }
        };

        bookMarkClient.wmdeleteBookMarkAsync(bookMarkId);

However according to many answers on stackoverflow these can not be removed, such that if I call this code again my event is fired twice. So I want to remove the lambda code and do this:

//in the class constructor
bookMarkClient.wmdeleteBookMarkCompleted += new EventHandler<wmdeleteBookMarkCompletedEventArgs>(bookMarkClient_wmdeleteBookMarkCompleted);

//Proc on the same class
 void bookMarkClient_wmdeleteBookMarkCompleted(object sender, wmdeleteBookMarkCompletedEventArgs e)
        {
            if (ea.Result = "Success")
            {
                foreach (BookMark bookMark in BookMarks)
                {
                   if (bookMarkId == bookMark.bm_id)
                    {
                        BookMarks.Remove(bookMark);
                        OnNotifyPropertyChanged("BookMarks");
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }

              }

//on button click
bookMarkClient.wmdeleteBookMarkAsync(bookMarkId);

HOWEVER: the variable bookMarkId is no longer available. I understand this is because the lambda event copies the variable in to the constructed class and keeps it alive for the duration of the event. So how do I do the same?

I've tried setting a private variable but test show this can be changed before the call back is received! This would also apply to the collection called Bookmarks.

Note, This is a Silverlight client and I'd rather not pass back the Id/collection in the event args as this would mean reworking lots of wcf code.

Many Thanks, Matt

ps first post to stack so take it easy on me...

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2 Answers 2

Store the event handler in a local variable; then you can add and remove the same event handler:

EventHandler<wmdeleteBookMarkCompletedEventArgs> handler = (s, ea) => { .... }
bookMarkClient.wmdeleteBookMarkCompleted += handler;
// ...
bookMarkClient.wmdeleteBookMarkCompleted -= handler;

Alternatively, a lambda expression is just syntactic sugar for a compiler-generated nested class. If you can't add the bookmark ID to the EventArgs, simulate a lambda by creating your own class:

BookmarkDeletedListener listener = new BookmarkDeletedListener(this, bookMarkId);
bookMarkClient.wmdeleteBookMarkCompleted += listener.DeleteBookmarkCompleted;
bookMarkClient.wmdeleteBookMarkCompleted -= listener.DeleteBookmarkCompleted;

// ...

class BookmarkDeletedListener
{
    public BookmarkDeletedListener(ParentClass parent, string bookmarkId)
    {
        _parent = parent;
        _bookmarkId = bookmarkId;
    }

    public DeleteBookmarkCompleted(object sender, wmdeleteBookMarkCompletedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (ea.Result = "Success")
        {
            foreach (BookMark bookMark in BookMarks)
            {
                if (_bookmarkId == bookMark.bm_id)
                {
                    _parent.BookMarks.Remove(bookMark);
                    _parent.OnNotifyPropertyChanged("BookMarks");
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    readonly ParentClass _parent;
    readonly string _bookmarkId;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, as per my reply to the other answer I tried removing the lambda using a local variable - with mixed results. Your solution looks feasable but I'm not sure where declare the listner and then to +/- the handler. If I add it, call the async method and then remove it on the next line then the callback is never received! Finally it forces me to make Bookmarks and onNotifyPropertyChanged public (not ideal). Matt –  MattPil29 Dec 9 '10 at 15:49

You can remove a lambda, AFAIK, as long as you hold onto it. It can even remove itself when fired:

Action<object, wmdeleteBookMarkCompletedEventArgs> handler;
handler =
    (s, ea) =>
        {
            bookMarkClient.wmdeleteCompleted -= handler;
            if (ea.Result == "Success")
            ...
        };

bookMarkClient.wmdeleteCompleted += handler;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the rapid response. This gives an error "Use of unassigned local variable 'handler'". Regardless I already have some code like that but I'd like to move to using events that are more clearly attached to the client when it's first created. So the questions still stands, how do I get acces to the class properties [in the state they were in when the async method was called]? –  MattPil29 Dec 9 '10 at 15:30
    
Follow up: if the handler is defined as a private variable on the class then the above example [appears to] work. However if the handler is defined as a local variable (inside the calling proc) then the compiler complains. Still don't really know the anser to my question though! –  MattPil29 Dec 10 '10 at 8:59
    
The code is missing a small detail. The first line needs "= null" to be added between "handler" and ";". This is a result of C#'s 'definite assignment' rules. (The compiler's arguably being a little paranoid here, but it's easy enough to work around that.) –  Ian Griffiths Dec 14 '10 at 11:02
    
This recent blog post is also useful: dotnetspeak.com/index.php/2011/05/events-and-lambda-expressions –  MattPil29 Jun 3 '11 at 12:50

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