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I have this code:

<?php
for($i = 0; $i<30; $i++)
{
    echo "$i<br>";          
    usleep(100000); 
}

?>

I would like to know how make the browser display 0, then 1, then 2, ...

In my example, it loads for a while and then display 0-29.

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I'm curious. Why would you want to do this? – DampeS8N Dec 9 '10 at 15:25
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Disable all output buffering and pad the output:

while(@ob_get_clean());

for($i = 0; $i<30; $i++)
{
    echo str_pad("$i<br>",4096);          
    usleep(100000); 
}

Also, this won't work, if your Apache is using mod_deflate and you have gzip-compression for text/html files.

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what is the purpose of str_pad? – Caner Dec 9 '10 at 15:03
2  
Output isn't sent immediately by Apache. It is sent in chunks of a certain size; hence the padding. – Linus Kleen Dec 9 '10 at 15:05
    
Thanks, this worked. Is there a way to remove mod_deflate and gzip from one single file and make them work the other files? – Gabriel Bianconi Dec 9 '10 at 15:06
    
Yes. You'll have to activate it locally (not in the httpd.conf) by using an .htaccess file in a directory in which you'd like compression and put the scripts that aren't to be compressed in a different directory. – Linus Kleen Dec 9 '10 at 15:10
1  
It can be achieved w/ an .htaccess file. In a <FilesMatch> block, put RemoveOutputFilter .php. The output will not be handled by mod_deflate then. – Linus Kleen Dec 9 '10 at 15:20

Flush the output buffer manually:

<?php
ob_start();
for($i = 0; $i<30; $i++)
{
    echo "$i<br>";
    ob_flush();
    usleep(100000); 
}
?>
share|improve this answer
2  
This won't work. You'll have to additionally pad the output. – Linus Kleen Dec 9 '10 at 15:06

Use javascript. HTML isn't an interactive console.

EDIT: Those of you downvoting, please remember that I am proposing an actual working solution. Incremental output from php is in no way a valid solution here, because there are some many places along the way where it could get buffered, and browsers are in no way obligated to render html incrementally as it comes in.

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He wasn't asking about HTML. This question is about PHP. – Linus Kleen Dec 9 '10 at 15:00
    
he clearly IS talking about html. See the <br> tag in the output? – Tyler Eaves Dec 9 '10 at 15:01
    
...and yet, it's still PHP. Think about non-blocking FTP uploads processed by a PHP file. It can be quite interactive then. – Linus Kleen Dec 9 '10 at 15:14
    
He wants to use PHP but he can't. This is a javascript effect. He needs to use setTimeout(). PHP will render his code and then send all the HTML as once to the client. That's what PHP do in combation with Apache. You can use PHP-CLI, that will work but only in console mode. – Stijn Leenknegt Dec 9 '10 at 15:19

Another perhaps quicker way is to do

<?php ob_implicit_flush(true); ?> 

to tell php to flush the output buffer after each output, not at the end of the file being processed.

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In my experience there is no reliable way to make a webpage send output data in realtime.

There are many different places where it can go wrong - and while you can easily get it to work on a single situation there will always be other places where the solution does not work.

Ultimately the only reliable solution is to execute your php code from a shell prompt (via SSH or whatever) and completely bypass apache and web browsers.

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