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I'm trying to get the count of surveys that need to be taken which is stored in seotc, and the count of surveys completed, stored seotcresults_v2. The seotc table holds nearly 100k records, and the seotcresults_v2 table hold about half that. How can I speed this query up?

SELECT 
  DISTINCT seotcresults_v2.Clock, 
  COUNT(seotc.Id) AS Surveys, 
  COUNT(seotcresults_v2.Id) AS Complete 
FROM seotc 
JOIN seotcresults_v2 ON seotcresults_v2.Clock = seotc.Clock
WHERE seotcresults_v2.CampusID = 40
AND seotcresults_v2.Term = 201011
ORDER BY seotc.Clock

UPDATE:

Thanks for all the responses. The table Structure (minimally) is as such:

seotc: | Id | Clock | CampusID | Term |

seotcresults_v2: | Id | Clock | CampusID | Term | Q1 | Q2 | ...etc

Id is the auto-incremented index in each table for the surveys and survey results

Where 'Clock' is an Id for an instructor and can be found multiple times in the seotc and seotcresults_v2 table because they have multiple classes and multiple surveys completed for each class for multiple terms. I'm essentially trying to determine the response rate based on the number of surveys for an instructor at a given campus in a given term versus the number of results posted given those same parameters. Does that help?

I will attempt to run the EXPLAIN as well shortly.

share|improve this question
1  
You might want to add the table structure to your question. – Christian Joudrey Dec 9 '10 at 15:58
    
What indexes do you have defined on these tables? – Marcelo Cantos Dec 9 '10 at 15:58
1  
Also please run EXPLAIN on the query and paste the output. – Christian Joudrey Dec 9 '10 at 15:58
1  
Don't you need a GROUP BY for the COUNT()s to work? – Teekin Dec 9 '10 at 16:00
    
Try creating a composite index on seotcresults_v2.(Clock,CampusID,Term) or (Clock,Term,CampusID)? – Victor Sergienko Dec 9 '10 at 16:00
up vote 3 down vote accepted

First things to check: are the WHERE-clause columns indexed?

Then: do you need the ORDER BY, which is a sort, and expensive.

Finally, are the .clock columns indexed?

share|improve this answer
    
What exactly do you mean by indexed? As in, "Are they in their own table with a proper auto-incremented Id?" If that is the question, then no, they are not, but the CampusID is unique. Is this what you mean? I'm not a DBA and what I've learned has been self-taught. I'd love to learn this if you have the patience to point me in the right direction. – d2burke Dec 13 '10 at 13:15
    
An auto-incremented ID (sequence, identity, whatever-your-db-calls-it) is not an index - it's just an automatically-incrementing unique identifier field on each row. An index is a separate entity from the table; where the table contains the data, an index contains just the key fields (often hashed) and a pointer into the table for where the data associated with that key can be found. Typically identity (sequence, autonumber, etc) fields have an index created automatically, which enforces uniqueness. – Eight-Bit Guru Dec 13 '10 at 18:05
    
However, the RDBMS will not automatically create indexes for other fields - you must do this yourself. As a broad rule of thumb, any field you specify in a WHERE, ORDER/GROUP BY, or JOIN clause might be a candidate for having an index. Without an index, the RDBMS often has to do a 'table scan' of the entire table every time it needs to compare two fields, or a value to a field, and this takes a long time (more and more as the table grows). An index lets the RDBMS 'shortcut' a table scan by having an ordered list of keys (or values) to scan and compare, and this is much faster. – Eight-Bit Guru Dec 13 '10 at 18:10

I don't think this query is even going to give you correct results.

Add an index to campusID and Term, and possibly clock. Then try this query:

SELECT seotcresults_v2.Clock, 
       COUNT(seotc.Id) AS Surveys, 
       COUNT(seotcresults_v2.Id) AS Complete 
FROM seotc 
JOIN seotcresults_v2 ON seotcresults_v2.Clock = seotc.Clock
WHERE seotcresults_v2.CampusID = 40
AND seotcresults_v2.Term = 201011
GROUP by seotcresults_v2.Clock
ORDER BY seotcresults_v2.Clock
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