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EDIT Most comments and answer here are totally wrong and offtopic. There are definitely memory leaks in Java.

The leaks I'm talking about are nicely summarized here.

Here are the facts:

  • the language Go has a garbage collector.

  • Java has a garbage collection

  • a lot of Java programs have (subtle or not) memory leaks

As an example of a Java program that has memory leaks (not for the faint of heart, the question may shake your beliefs), see here about a little Java program called Tomcat that even has a "find leaks" button: Is there a way to avoid undeployment memory leaks in Tomcat?

So I am wondering: will programs written in Go exhibit the same kind of (subtle or not) memory leaks that some programs written in Java exhibit?

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"a lot of Java programs have (subtle or not) memory leaks" do you have any evidence of this "fact" or is it just a talking point. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 9 '10 at 16:11
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@Peter Lawrey: It is a fact. My evidence are the countless articles and, say, advanced tools that have options like "Find probable memory leak" (was it JProfiler that had this?). Also, Google on Java "memory leaks" and you will have half a million hit (!). You, seriously, haven't been programming in Java long enough if you don't know what I'm talking about. I won't even start on subtle leaks, like class loader memory leaks, that have taken years to be found (a famous Tomcat + Hibernat + Sun VM example comes to mind). Honestly, comment like the one you just made bring nothing to SO. –  SyntaxT3rr0r Dec 9 '10 at 16:32
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@Webinator: I think you need to give an example of one of these "subtle memory leaks" that "a lot of" Java programs have. Unless you are claiming a bug in the garbage collector, the only way to leak memory in pure Java is to hold on to references that you are no longer using e.g. by putting objects in a collection and never removing them from that collection. If this is the kind of leak you are referring to, then no language in the world will protect against them, including Go. –  JeremyP Dec 9 '10 at 17:05
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@Webinator, Oh, and I have been developing Java for more than tens, two of them at Sun. I just checked my current trading system it doesn't show any increased memory consumption over the week. It only GCs once per day, (At a time scheduled time) which I am sure you will agree is non-trivial for a production system. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Dec 9 '10 at 17:30
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+1 for kicking the wasp nest that is Java. –  Matt Joiner Dec 11 '10 at 6:40
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5 Answers

You are confusing different types of memory leaks here.

The heinous, explicit-memory-management based memory leaks are gone in Java (or any other GC based language). These leaks are caused by completely losing access to chunks of memory without marking them as unused.

The "memory leaks" still present in Java and every other language on the face of the planet until the computer can read our minds are still with us, and will be for the foreseeable future. These leaks are caused by the code/programmer keeping references to objects which are technically no longer needed. These are fundamentally logic bugs, and cannot be prevented in any language using current technologies.

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Memory leak is simply when you forget to free up memory. In Java this occurs when you forget to set references to null. In C++ it happen if you forget to call free. Both are valid memory leak cases. And the fundamental problem is the same, you program consume more and more memory until it eventually crash with an OutOfMemory error. –  Nicolas Bousquet Jul 22 '11 at 12:03
    
While it is true that no language can prevent the programmer making such logic errors, it is also true that some such errors exist in the Java SDK itself (see, for example, java.util.logging.Level which contains a private static ArrayList into which all such objects that are constructed are placed on construction, and from which they are never removed), which makes it harder to avoid them when programming Java than in some other language that does not contain such flaws –  Jules Feb 23 at 14:22
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It's very possible that Go programs will exhibit memory leaks. The current implementation of Go has a simple mark-and-sweep garbage collector. This is only intended as a temporary solution and is not intended as the long term garbage collector. See this page for more info. Look under the header Go Garbage Collector. That page even has a link to code for the current version if you are so inclined.

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One of the problems of the mark and sweep collector in Java is memory fragementation. While not technically a memory it can be a loss of memory available to the application. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 9 '10 at 17:23
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Garbage collection or not, you can write a program that has memory-leaks in Java, Go, or any other language for the most part.

Garbage Collection does take some of the burden off the programmer but it does not prevent leaks entirely.

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I know, I know. I'm talking specifically about the kinda subtle memory-leaks that exist in Java even tough Java was, at its beginning, marketed as a language where memory leaks don't exist thanks to the GC. –  SyntaxT3rr0r Dec 9 '10 at 16:28
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Sorry that was not clear. You said "a lot of Java programs have (subtle or not) memory leaks". –  jzd Dec 9 '10 at 16:31
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A 'memory leak' is when a piece of memory that the programmer thought would be freed isn't freed. This can happen in any language, garbage collected or not. The usual cause in GC languages is retaining an additional reference to the memory.

"Languages don't cause memory leaks, programmers cause memory leaks".

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You are mixing abstraction levels here: the memory leaks are due to bugs in the library (where objects reference each other though chains of 'a holds reference to b' as well as a trade-off in the implementation of the garbage collector between efficiency and accuracy. How much time do you want to spend on finding out such loops? If you spend twice as much, you'll be able to detect loops twice as long.

So the memory leak issue is not programming language specific, there is no reason that by itself GO should be better or worse than Java.

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I don't entirely agree. Memory leaks are due to the fact that Java makes it possible to shoot one-self in the foot and it is not necessarily related to libraries bug. A lot of programmer write programs that slowly but surely leak memory in Java and that is their own fault, not the libraries' fault. Also, if precisely the Java GC is making a time/possible-leak tradeoff, is Go making the same tradeoffs? –  SyntaxT3rr0r Dec 9 '10 at 16:10
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and the question is really not "how much time do I want to spend on finding out such loops?" The question is "How much time do the specs mandates the Go GC spend on such loops", which IMHO is an interesting question. –  SyntaxT3rr0r Dec 9 '10 at 16:11
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Cyclic reference chains do not prevent garbage collection in Java. –  Andy Thomas Dec 9 '10 at 16:31
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