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String a = new String ("TEST");
String b = new String ("TEST");

if(a == b) { 
  System.out.println ("TRUE"); 
} else {
 System.out.println ("FALSE"); 
}

I tried it and it printed FALSE, I want to know the reason exactly.

Thanks in advance.

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2  
What do you think it is? ( hint: grab a text editor and a compiler and find out ) –  OscarRyz Dec 9 '10 at 16:14
2  
Then ask: "I'm getting this but I thought I would get that.. why is it etc. etc" –  OscarRyz Dec 9 '10 at 16:16
1  
You could have tried it and posted the output and asked why it was the output. –  user529141 Dec 9 '10 at 16:16
2  
Actually, I'll say it won't compile....what's s.o.p? sarcastic laugh –  Buhake Sindi Dec 9 '10 at 16:17
2  
@scheffield.. I take it you don't understand the word "sarcastic" :P –  user529141 Dec 9 '10 at 16:21
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6 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

It prints FALSE.

The == operator compares object references, a and b are references to two different objects, hence the FALSE.

Guido said:
Additionally, the references are different because the Strings are created using the new operator. If you create them as String a = "TEST"; String b = "TEST"; then the output will probably be TRUE because the JVM checks the existence of a matching String object in the String pool it keeps, so the same object would be reused.

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7  
Additionally, the references are different because the Strings are created using the new operator. If you create them as String a = "TEST"; String b = "TEST"; then the output will probably be TRUE because the JVM checks the existence of a matching String object in the String pool it keeps, so the same object would be reused. –  Guido García Dec 9 '10 at 16:20
2  
It WILL be true, not "probably". –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Dec 9 '10 at 17:01
1  
@Thorbjørn 100% sure? Does the Java/JVM specification says that the String pool is mandatory and anything about its size or how long String references have to be kept? I don't know why but my intuition claims that it is only 99.9999% sure. –  Guido García Dec 9 '10 at 17:08
3  
@Guido, from java.sun.com/docs/books/jls/second_edition/html/… section 3.10.5 " String literals-or, more generally, strings that are the values of constant expressions (§15.28)-are "interned" so as to share unique instances, using the method String.intern.". In your example the two "TEST" are string literals. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Dec 9 '10 at 18:08
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The code would print FALSE. A corrected version of the code would use .equals() instead of ==

String a = new String ("TEST");

String b = new String ("TEST");

if(a.equals(b)) { 
  s.o.p ("TRUE"); 
} else {
 s.o.p ("FALSE"); 
}
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Fair enough but as Alberto had already explained this I was just adding how to correct it. Next time I'll reference the other answer. –  Laurence Dawson Dec 9 '10 at 16:24
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Just to make it complete:

String a = new String ("TEST").intern();

String b = new String ("TEST").intern();

System.out.println(a == b);

This will return true in most cases.

Thats the reason for this:

public static void main(String [] args) {
    // will return true
    System.out.println(compare("TEST", "TEST"));
}

public static boolean compare (String a, String b) {
    return a == b;
}
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1  
Yes, but this works only for string literals, since they reuse object. In general case equals should be preferred over ==. –  Goran Jovic Dec 9 '10 at 16:35
    
works for any intern()ed string, literal or otherwise. However, it a BAD idea to depend on this behaviour. equals() is the best to use. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 9 '10 at 17:01
    
Your both right. I just wanna show that there is a possibility to use Object equalety. The same holds true for Interger.valueOf(200) == Integer.valueOf(200);... –  scheffield Dec 10 '10 at 8:06
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When you create a new object ( either string or any other ) what gets returned is a copy of the value reference to that new object.

When two objects have the same reference, the == operator will evaluate to true.

ie.

Object o = new Object();
Object p = o; //<-- assigning the same reference value
System.out.println("o == p ? " + (o == p ) ); //<-- true

When you create two objects each one have their own reference value:

Object a = new Object();
Object b = new Object();
System.out.println("o == p ? " + (o == p ) ); //<-- false

Same thing happens with Strings objects.

When you assign a string literal, you get the same reference:

String x = "hello";
String y = "hello";

System.out.println("x == y ? " + (x == y ) ); //<-- true

But you example you're creating new objects, hence they have different reference values.

The effectively compare strings ( or any other Object ) , you should use the equals() method.

String literals are by default sent to an string pool to enhance performance.

If you want to make use of this pool, you could invoke the intern() method which, returns the object in the pool if it exists.

 String a = "world";
 String b = new String("world");
 String c = new String("world").intern();//<-- returns the reference value in the pool.


 System.out.println("a == b ? "  + (a==b) ); //<-- false
 System.out.println("b == c ? "  + (b==c) ); //<-- false
 System.out.println("a == c ? "  + (a==c) ); // true!
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If two String variables point to the same object then these two variables are called references for the same object,

So if u want to check this comparison programmatically, == operator is used. If two variables refers the same object then this operator returns true value and if they don't then false value is returned

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Here we are using two new keywords. For every new keyword a new object is generated.

The == method checks for the hashcode of the object, in this case we get false as the answer.

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