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I have the following method :

    private void WriteTrace(object sender, EventArgs e, EventElement eventElement)
    {
    /* ... */
    }

When I want to create Delegate like this :

Type controlType = control.GetType();
MethodInfo method = typeof(Trace).GetMethod("WriteTrace", BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance);
EventInfo eventInfo = type.Value.GetType().GetEvent("Load");  // for the sample, we suppose the control is a form.
Delegate handler = Delegate.CreateDelegate(eventInfo.EventHandlerType, this, method);
eventInfo.AddEventHandler(control, handler);

The line

Delegate handler = Delegate.CreateDelegate(eventInfo.EventHandlerType, this, method);

generates an error :

Error binding to target method

But I don't know why ?

Regards,

Florian

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

The type of Form.Load is EventHandler, which only has two parameters, not three. In other words, this would fail too:

EventHandler x = new EventHandler(WriteTrace);

You can't create an event handler from a method with the wrong number of parameters. (Actually there are some tricks around creating open delegates like this, but they're not relevant here, IMO.)

What are you really trying to achieve? What would you expect eventElement to be in this case?

Note that you can use lambda expressions to capture variables, e.g.

EventElement element = ...;
form.Load += (sender, args) => WriteTrace(sender, args, element);

Does that help you at all? Or do you really need to do this with reflection?

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Ok, I understood my mistake... thank you – Florian Dec 9 '10 at 16:20

The short answer is you cannot directly bind the event handler to a method with three parameters; the method you pass in must match the signature exactly.

The question is, where does this "EventElement" parameter come from? Once you know that, you can squirrel it away in another object, ala:

class HandlerThunk {
  EventElement eventElement;
  Trace receiver;

  // ...

  public void Handler(object sender, EventArgs e) {
    this.receiver.WriteTrace(sender, e, this.eventElement);  
  }
}

...and then bind it...

HandlerThunk thunk = ...;

Type controlType = control.GetType();
MethodInfo method = typeof(HandlerThunk).GetMethod("WriteTrace", BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance);
EventInfo eventInfo = type.Value.GetType().GetEvent("Load");  
Delegate handler = Delegate.CreateDelegate(eventInfo.EventHandlerType, thunk, method);
eventInfo.AddEventHandler(control, handler);

And then the thunk will forward the event to you.

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