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In my object conversion code I have tons of:

    try
    {
        NativeObject.Property1= int.Parse(TextObject.Property1);
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        Trace.WriteLineIf(ConverterSwitch.TraceVerbose, e);
    }
    try
    {
        NativeObject.Property2= DateTime.Parse(TextObject.Property2);
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        Trace.WriteLineIf(ConverterSwitch.TraceVerbose, e);
    }

And so on... I do not want all conversion to fail cause of some property so I can't put all this in one try block, but I need to log if something fails and continue..
Is there a way to compact all this try catch things?

Pity we can't write in C# code like:

try
{
    int num = int.Parse("3");
    decimal num2 = decimal.Parse("3.4");
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    Trace.Write(e);
    continue; //continue execution from the point we left. (line 2)
}
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2  
If you switch to VB.NET, you could use On Error Resume Next :-) –  Cody Gray Dec 9 '10 at 16:27
    
Somewhere a VB6/VBA developer is snickering at you. Never thought I'd hear someone pine for "On error resume next" –  JohnFx Dec 9 '10 at 16:28
2  
@Cody: Oh, God. Oh, God no. Please, no. –  cdhowie Dec 9 '10 at 16:29
1  
You should be using a tryParse and validating your data. If data has a chance to be invalid, it should be validated, Exceptions are horribly inefficient. Exceptions actually causes a cpu interrupt. Talking about thousands of cycles. –  Bengie Dec 9 '10 at 17:16
    
@Bengie: I agree that exceptions are slow, I will surely add some validation checks later, i don't want to waste time on optimization for now. –  Alex Burtsev Dec 9 '10 at 17:20
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6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

No but you can:

private static void ExecuteAndCatchException(Action action)
{
  try 
  { 
    action();
  } 
  catch (Exception e) 
  { 
    Trace.Write(e); 
  } 
}

and then

ExecuteAndCatchException(() => NativeObject.Property1 = int.Parse(TextObject.Property1)); 
ExecuteAndCatchException(() => NativeObject.Property2 = DateTime.Parse(TextObject.Property2));
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1  
It's a shame this won't actually compile from typos... :P –  cdhowie Dec 9 '10 at 16:29
    
@cdhowie, oops, I did not try to compile it, where are the typos? –  vc 74 Dec 9 '10 at 16:31
    
@vc: Action(); -- also, the method should really be static since this is never used. –  cdhowie Dec 9 '10 at 16:32
    
@cdhowie: well spotted! –  vc 74 Dec 9 '10 at 16:34
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You could use the TryParse methods, when available. See below sample code for parsing an Int32 value.

   private static void TryToParse(string value)
   {
      int number;
      bool result = Int32.TryParse(value, out number);
      if (result)
      {
         Console.WriteLine("Converted '{0}' to {1}.", value, number);         
      }
      else
      {
         if (value == null) value = ""; 
         Console.WriteLine("Attempted conversion of '{0}' failed.", value);
      }
   }
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1  
Yes, this is the correct approach, assuming that the sample code from the question accurately depicts the extent of what you want to accomplish with these nested Try-Catch blocks. It's always better to prevent exceptions when possible rather than trying to handle them. –  Cody Gray Dec 9 '10 at 16:32
1  
Good answer! +1 for solving the actual problem instead of answering a question about the workaround. –  JohnFx Dec 9 '10 at 16:33
    
+1 TryParse is the better way to go if you want to ignore parsing errors. –  juharr Dec 9 '10 at 16:34
    
@BobBlack: well my real code is not so simple as I wrote, so the general aproach with Action<> is better for me. –  Alex Burtsev Dec 9 '10 at 16:37
    
Was just about to suggest this myself but you beat me to it :) –  Piers Myers Dec 9 '10 at 17:49
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You could do something like this:

private static void Attempt(Action action)
{
    try { action(); }
    catch (Exception e) {
        Trace.WriteLineIf(ConverterSwitch.TraceVerbose, e);
    }
}

Then:

Attempt(() => NativeObject.Property1 = int.Parse(TextObject.Property1));
Attempt(() => NativeObject.Property2 = DateTime.Parse(TextObject.Property2));
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It sound like you're looking for something akin to VBs On Error + Resume Next. C# has no such facility. The best way of compacting I can think of is to use lambda expressions and helper methods.

private void Wrap(Action del) {
  try {
    del();
  } catch (Exception e) {
    Trace.WriteLineIf(ConverterSwitch.TraceVerbose, e);
  }
}

Wrap(() => { NativeObject.Property1= int.Parse(TextObject.Property1); });
Wrap(() => { NativeObject.Property2= DateTime.Parse(TextObject.Property2); });
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You could write a SafeConvert class that encapsulates the converting and logging as such:

public static class SafeConvert{

  public static int ParseInt(string val)
  {
    int retval = default;
    try 
    { 
       retval = int.Parse(val); 
    } 
    catch (Exception e) 
    { 
        Trace.WriteLineIf(ConverterSwitch.TraceVerbose, e); 
    } 
        return retval;
 }

}

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Whilst I'm not sure about the Exception block shortening, I like the idea you've proposed. It's similar to On Error Resume Next in VB of old. When doing loads of Parse-ing, I'd go down the route of using TryParse when it's available. You could then say something like:

If(!DateTime.TryParse(TextObject.Property2, out NativeObject.Property2)) {
    // Failed!
}
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