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How can I write this simple Record-and-replay based test in AAA Syntax with Rhino Mocks framework?

public interface IStudentReporter
{
      void PrintStudentReport(List<IStudent> students);
      List<IStudent> GetUnGraduatedStudents(List<IStudent> students);
      void AddStudentsToEmptyClassRoom(IClassRoom classroom, List<IStudent> 
}




 [Test]
    public void PrintStudentReport_ClassRoomPassed_StudentListOfFive()
     {
        IClassRoom classRoom = GetClassRoom(); // Gets a class with 5 students

        MockRepository fakeRepositoery = new MockRepository();
        IStudentReporter reporter = fakeRepositoery
                                    .StrictMock<IStudentReporter>();

        using(fakeRepositoery.Record())
           {
              reporter.PrintStudentReport(null);

              // We decalre constraint for parameter in 0th index 
              LastCall.Constraints(List.Count(Is.Equal(5))); 
           }

       reporter.PrintStudentReport(classRoom.Students);
       fakeRepositoery.Verify(reporter);
      }
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1 Answer 1

Ok. I found the way:

[Test]
public void PrintStudentReport_ClassRoomPassed_StudentListOfFive_WithAAA()
{
    //Arrange
    IClassRoom classRoom = GetClassRoom(); // Gets a class with 5 students
    IStudentReporter reporter = MockRepository.GenerateMock<IStudentReporter>();

    //Act
    reporter.PrintStudentReport(classRoom.Students);

    //Assert
    reporter
        .AssertWasCalled(r =>  r.PrintStudentReport(
                        Arg<List<IStudent>>
                               .List.Count(Is.Equal(5)))
                         );
}
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3  
I think yould should use GenerateStub here. You only need GenerateMock if you want to use .Expect. See the user guidance about the difference between GenerateMock and GenerateStub (though to be honest the page as a whole is also a bit confusing... I'm referring to the part where it says "In most cases, you should prefer to use stubs. Only when you are testing complex interactions would I recommend to use mock objects.") –  Wim Coenen Dec 9 '10 at 20:12

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