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Let say that we have an array

a = np.array([10,30,50, 20, 10, 90, 0, 25])

The pseudo code for what I want -

if a[x] > 80 then perform funcA on a[x]
if 40 < a[x] <= 80 then perform funcB on a[x]
if a[x] <= 40 then perform funcC on a[x]

What is the cleanest way to perform this using numpy functions?

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Can funcA() etc. be expressed in terms of NumPy ufuncs? What do these functions do? –  Sven Marnach Dec 9 '10 at 17:15
    
What about map? –  nmichaels Dec 9 '10 at 17:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Usually, you try to avoid any Python loops over NumPy arrays -- that's why you use NumPy in the first place. For the sake of example, I assume that funcA() adds 1 to all elements, funcB() adds 2 and funcC() adds 3 (please elaborate what they really do for a more tailor-made example). To achieve what you want, you can do this:

subset_a = a > 80
subset_b = (40 < a) & (a <= 80)
subset_c = a <= 40
a[subset_a] += 1
a[subset_b] += 2
a[subset_c] += 3

This uses NumPy advanced indexing. For example a > 80 evaluates to an array of Boolean values which can be used to select the entries in the array fulfilling the condition.

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1  
Can you really do a[40 < a <= 80]? My version of numpy throws an error when I tried. –  mtrw Dec 9 '10 at 17:46
    
@mtrw: You are right, fixed. –  Sven Marnach Dec 9 '10 at 17:49
    
My numpy throws an error on 'and': a = np.array([10,30,50, 20, 10, 90, 0, 25]); subset_b = 40 < a and a <= 80; ValueError: The truth value of an array with more than one element is ambiguous. Use a.any() or a.all(). –  Spacedman Dec 9 '10 at 18:09
5  
@Spacedman - To do a[40 < a <=80] you just need to do a[(40 < a) & (a <= 80)] You have to use & and not and, and you have to use parenthesis. 40 < a and a <= 80 won't work. (40 < a) & (a <= 80) will. –  Joe Kington Dec 9 '10 at 18:16
    
Thanks to all - with Joe Kington's comment this provides exactly what I need. –  tnt Dec 9 '10 at 18:35

Look at numpy.piecewise. I think you want:

np.piecewise( a, [a > 80, (40 < a) & (a <= 80), a <= 40], [funcA, funcB, funcC] )
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This also copies everything twice, but I like it anyway. –  Sven Marnach Dec 9 '10 at 20:39

I like this:

b = np.empty(a.shape)
b[a < 40] = funcA(a[a < 40])
b[(a > 40) & (a <= 80)] = funcB(a[(a > 40) & (a <= 80)])
b[a > 80] = funcC(a[a > 80])

This avoids weird behavior when funcA sets an element of a that had been 39 to 41, for instance, thus bringing it into the range for funcB.

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I avoided to do this because it creates copies, performs the actions on the copied data and copies again to store the data. –  Sven Marnach Dec 9 '10 at 17:52

If you need more complex functions you can use

      newfunc=numpy.vectorize(lambda x: func(x))
      result=newfunc(yourArray)

where func(x) is your function.

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