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Prepare for a wall of code... It's a long read, but it's as verbose as I can get.

In response to Still lost on Repositories and Decoupling, ASP.NET MVC

I think I am starting to get closer to understanding this all. I'm trying to get used to using this. Here is what I have so far.

Project

Project.Web (ASP.NET MVC 3.0 RC)

  • Uses Project.Models
  • Uses Project.Persistence

Project

Project.Models (Domain Objects)

  • Membership.Member
  • Membership.IMembershipProvider

Project

Project.Persistence (Fluent nHibernate)

  • Uses Project.Models
  • Uses Castle.Core
  • Uses Castle.Windsor

  • Membership.MembershipProvider : IMembershipProvider

I have the following class in Project.Persistence

using Castle.Windsor;

using Castle.MicroKernel.Registration;
using Castle.MicroKernel.SubSystems.Configuration;

namespace Project.Persistence
{
    public static class IoC
    {
        private static IWindsorContainer _container;

        public static void Initialize()
        {
            _container = new WindsorContainer()
                .Install(
                    new Persistence.Containers.Installers.RepositoryInstaller()
            );
        }

        public static T Resolve<T>()
        {
            return _container.Resolve<T>();
        }
    }
}
namespace Persistence.Containers.Installers
{
    public class RepositoryInstaller : IWindsorInstaller
    {
        public void Install(IWindsorContainer container, IConfigurationStore store)
        {
            container.Register(
                Component
                .For<Membership.IMembershipProvider>()
                .ImplementedBy<Membership.MembershipProvider>()
                .LifeStyle.Singleton
            );
        }
    }
}

Now, in Project.Web Global.asax Application_Start, I have the following code.

    protected void Application_Start()
    {
        AreaRegistration.RegisterAllAreas();

        RegisterGlobalFilters(GlobalFilters.Filters);
        RegisterRoutes(RouteTable.Routes);

        // Register the Windsor Container
        Project.Persistence.IoC.Initialize();
    }

Now then, in Project.Web.Controllers.MembershipController I have the following code.

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult Register( Web.Models.Authentication.Registration model)
    {
        if (ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            var provider = IoC.Resolve<Membership.IMembershipProvider>();
            provider.CreateUser(model.Email, model.Password);
        }

        // If we got this far, something failed, redisplay form
        return View(model);
    }

So I am asking first of all..

Am I on the right track?

How can I use Castle.Windsor for my ISessionFactory

I have my SessionFactory working like this ...

namespace Project.Persistence.Factories
{
    public sealed class SessionFactoryContainer
    {
        private static readonly ISessionFactory _instance = CreateSessionFactory();

        static SessionFactoryContainer()
        { 

        }

        public static ISessionFactory Instance
        {
            get { return _instance; }
        }

        private static ISessionFactory CreateSessionFactory()
        {
            return Persistence.SessionFactory.Map(@"Data Source=.\SQLEXPRESS;Initial Catalog=FluentExample;Integrated Security=true", true);
        }
    }
}
namespace Project.Persistence
{
    public static class SessionFactory
    {
        public static ISessionFactory Map(string connectionString, bool createSchema)
        {
            return FluentNHibernate.Cfg.Fluently.Configure()
                .Database(FluentNHibernate.Cfg.Db.MsSqlConfiguration.MsSql2008
                    .ConnectionString(c => c.Is(connectionString)))
                    .ExposeConfiguration(config =>
                    {
                        new NHibernate.Tool.hbm2ddl.SchemaExport(config)
                            .SetOutputFile("Output.sql")
                            .Create(/* Output to console */ false, /* Execute script against database */ createSchema);
                    })
                    .Mappings(m =>
                    {
                        m.FluentMappings.Conventions.Setup(x =>
                        {
                            x.AddFromAssemblyOf<Program>();
                            x.Add(FluentNHibernate.Conventions.Helpers.AutoImport.Never());
                        });

                        m.FluentMappings.AddFromAssemblyOf<Mapping.MembershipMap>();
                    }).BuildSessionFactory();
        }

So basically, within my Project.Persistence layer, I call the SessionFactory like this..

var session = SessionFactoryContainer.Instance.OpenSession()

Am I even getting close to doing this right? I'm still confused - I feel like the ISessionFactory should be part of Castle.Windsor, but I can't seem to figure out how to do that. I'm confused also about the way I am creating the Repository in the Controller. Does this mean I have to do all of the 'mapping' each time I use the Repository? That seems like it would be very resource intensive.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Firstly some conceptual details. In an ASP.NET MVC application the typical entry point for a page request is a controller. We want the Inversion of Control container to resolve our controllers for us, because then any dependencies that the controllers have can also be automatically resolved simply by listing the dependencies as arguments in the controllers' constructors.

Confused yet? Here's an example of how you'd use IoC, after it is all set up. I think explaining it this way makes things easier!

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    // lets say your home page controller depends upon two providers
    private readonly IMembershipProvider membershipProvider;
    private readonly IBlogProvider blogProvider;

    // constructor, with the dependencies being passed in as arguments
    public HomeController(
                IMembershipProvider membershipProvider,
                IBlogProvider blogProvider)
    {
        this.membershipProvider = membershipProvider;
        this.blogProvider = blogProvider;
    }

    // so taking your Registration example...
    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult Register( Web.Models.Authentication.Registration model)
    {
        if (ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            this.membershipProvider.CreateUser(model.Email, model.Password);
        }

        // If we got this far, something failed, redisplay form
        return View(model);
    }
}

Note that you have not had to do any resolving yourself, you have just specified in the controller what the dependencies are. Nor have you actually given any indication of how the dependencies are implemented - it's all decoupled. It's very simple there is nothing complicated here :-)

Hopefully at this point you are asking, "but how does the constructor get instantiated?" This is where we start to set up your Castle container, and we do this entirely in the MVC Web project (not Persistence or Domain). Edit the Global.asax file, setting Castle Windsor to act as the controller factory:

protected void Application_Start()
{
//...   
    ControllerBuilder.Current
        .SetControllerFactory(typeof(WindsorControllerFactory));
}

...and define the WindsorControllerFactory so that your controllers are instantiated by Windsor:

/// Use Castle Windsor to create controllers and provide DI
public class WindsorControllerFactory : DefaultControllerFactory
{
    private readonly IWindsorContainer container;

    public WindsorControllerFactory()
    {
        container = ContainerFactory.Current();
    }

    protected override IController GetControllerInstance(
        RequestContext requestContext,
        Type controllerType)
    {
        return (IController)container.Resolve(controllerType);
    }
}

The ContainerFactory.Current() method is static singleton that returns a configured Castle Windsor container. The configuration of the container instructs Windsor on how to resolve your application's dependencies. So for example, you might have a container configured to resolve the NHibernate SessionFactory, and your IMembershipProvider.

I like to configure my Castle container using several "installers". Each installer is responsible for a different type of dependency, so I'd have a Controller installer, an NHibernate installer, a Provider installer for example.

Firstly we have the ContainerFactory:

public class ContainerFactory
{
    private static IWindsorContainer container;
    private static readonly object SyncObject = new object();

    public static IWindsorContainer Current()
    {
        if (container == null)
        {
            lock (SyncObject)
            {
                if (container == null)
                {
                    container = new WindsorContainer();
                    container.Install(new ControllerInstaller());
                    container.Install(new NHibernateInstaller());
                    container.Install(new ProviderInstaller());
                }
            }
        }
        return container;
    }
}

...and then we need each of the installers. The ControllerInstaller first:

public class ControllerInstaller : IWindsorInstaller
{
    public void Install(IWindsorContainer container, IConfigurationStore store)
    {
        container.Register(
            AllTypes
                .FromAssembly(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly())
                .BasedOn<IController>()
                .Configure(c => c.Named(
                    c.Implementation.Name.ToLowerInvariant()).LifeStyle.PerWebRequest));
    }
}

... and here is my NHibernateInstaller although it is different to yours, you can use your own configuration. Note that I'm reusing the same ISessionFactory instance every time one is resolved:

public class NHibernateInstaller : IWindsorInstaller
{
    private static ISessionFactory factory;
    private static readonly object SyncObject = new object();

    public void Install(IWindsorContainer container, IConfigurationStore store)
    {
        var windsorContainer = container.Register(
            Component.For<ISessionFactory>()
                .UsingFactoryMethod(SessionFactoryFactory));
    }

    private static ISessionFactory SessionFactoryFactory()
    {
        if (factory == null)
        {
            lock (SyncObject)
            {
                if (factory == null)
                {
                    var cfg = new Configuration();
                    factory = cfg.Configure().BuildSessionFactory();
                }
            }
        }

        return factory;
    }
}

And finally you'll want to define your ProvidersInstaller:

public class ProvidersInstaller : IWindsorInstaller
{
    public void Install(IWindsorContainer container, IConfigurationStore store)
    {
        var windsorContainer = container
            .Register(
                Component
                    .For<IMembershipProvider>()
                    .ImplementedBy<SubjectQueries>())
            .Register(
                Component
                    .For<IBlogProvider>()
                    .ImplementedBy<SubjectQueries>());

            // ... and any more that your need to register
    }
}

This should be enough code to get going! Hopefully you're still with me as the beauty of the Castle container becomes apparent very shortly.

When you define your implementation of your IMembershipProvider in your persistence layer, remember that it has a dependency on the NHibernate ISessionFactory. All you need to do is this:

public class NHMembershipProvider : IMembershipProvider
{
    private readonly ISessionFactory sessionFactory;

    public NHMembershipProvider(ISessionFactory sessionFactory)
    {
        this.sessionFactory = sessionFactory;
    }
}

Note that because Castle Windsor is creating your controllers and the providers passed to your controller constructor, the provider is automatically being passed the ISessionFactory implementation configured in your Windsor container!

You never have to worry about instantiating any dependencies again. Your container does it all automatically for you.

Finally, note that the IMembershipProvider should be defined as part of your domain, as it is defining the interface for how your domain behaviours. As noted above, the implementation of your domain interfaces which deal with databases are added to the persistence layer.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, this makes much more sense! Thank you! The fact that you are supposed to establish the Controllers to be created by Castle.Windsor is what really threw me. It just never made sense to me where it was supposed to come together, and the examples I kept finding just didn't say that explicitly. Thank you very much - this will require a lot of tweaking to fit into my application, but it is much clearer than anything I've run across. –  Ciel Dec 9 '10 at 20:57
1  
I have to say that the Castle documentation isn't the easiest to navigate too. It really needs to be turned on it's head for newbies to understand. I explain it this way because I am a relative newbie myself, and what is obvious to the core team, just isn't to new comers. I'm glad I was able to help! –  cspolton Dec 9 '10 at 21:00
    
As Mauricio pointed out, it is free - as such there will always be things that need to be worked on. I understand that certain aspects of the developer platform require certain things to be understood, but I do feel that a lot of things revolving around DI are not very 'collected'. It feels like a scavenger hunt to discover it, and to understand it in general. –  Ciel Dec 9 '10 at 21:14
1  
@Stacey, @Spolto: if the docs need improving, please do so. stw.castleproject.org is an open wiki. We (the Castle team) obviously suffer from so-called "curse of knowledge" (37signals.com/svn/posts/213-the-curse-of-knowledge), so an outsider could help a lot with this. –  Mauricio Scheffer Dec 9 '10 at 23:47
2  
@Mauricio: All programmers suffer from this, not the Castle team. I am not qualified to speak on behalf of the entire programming community, but I have learned that most programmers forget the time when they had no idea how to get something done that they had to do, and stayed up for days on end doing web searches and pulling hair out. I never intended to make you, or the Castle team, feel attacked, and I am very sorry if I did. I am one rookie programmer, with no peers in my workplace to edify me. Stackoverflow is quite literally the closest I have ever come to speaking to another programmer –  Ciel Dec 9 '10 at 23:59

Avoid using a static IoC class like this. By doing this you're using the container as a service locator, so you won't achieve the full decoupling of inversion of control. See this article for further explanations about this.

Also check out Sharp Architecture, which has best practices for ASP.NET MVC, NHibernate and Windsor.

If you have doubts about the lifecycle of the container itself, see Usage of IoC Containers; specifically Windsor

share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand. If I am constantly creating new instances of the locator, then I am wasting resources. What is the point of having Singleton Lifecycles if I am disposing the objects after being used? –  Ciel Dec 9 '10 at 19:45
    
Also, the link you give doesn't really help much. It just explains why it is bad, but doesn't really offer anything more intelligent. I thought the goal was to get away from needing constructor dependency? So now that's the opposite of the goal of IoC? The static IoC class I'm using is almost right out of the Castle.Windsor documentation itself! What's the right answer, then? –  Ciel Dec 9 '10 at 19:59
    
"If I am constantly creating new instances of the locator, then I am wasting resources." -> no, that doesn't happen. –  Mauricio Scheffer Dec 9 '10 at 20:03
    
"I thought the goal was to get away from needing constructor dependency" -> that's not the goal... where did you read that? –  Mauricio Scheffer Dec 9 '10 at 20:04
    
"The static IoC class I'm using is almost right out of the Castle.Windsor documentation itself" -> can you tell me where does it say this? –  Mauricio Scheffer Dec 9 '10 at 20:04

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