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I'd like to create a random string, consisting of alpha-numeric characters. I want to be able to be specify the length of the string.

How do I do this in C++?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 93 down vote accepted

Mehrdad Afshari's answer would do the trick, but I found it a bit too verbose for this simple task. Look-up tables can sometimes do wonders:

void gen_random(char *s, const int len) {
    static const char alphanum[] =
        "0123456789"
        "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"
        "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";

    for (int i = 0; i < len; ++i) {
        s[i] = alphanum[rand() % (sizeof(alphanum) - 1)];
    }

    s[len] = 0;
}
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1  
Nice. I wanted to mention this in a comment. This approach works better if, like this example, the count of elements is small. The drawback is it doesn't scale well if you wanted to generate random numbers from large distinct continues sets. –  Mehrdad Afshari Jan 13 '09 at 18:44
1  
I like this answer better. It's more flexible, because you can eliminate characters easily. For example, making a random alphanumeric string without the character I would be trivial in this function. It is also easier to understand, in my opinion. –  William Brendel Jan 13 '09 at 18:48
1  
+1, This way you can add certain special char without having to worry about the entire set. Much better. –  WolfmanDragon Jan 13 '09 at 18:49
1  
@Kent: that's what the OpenSSL team though, until someone thought of putting their code through valgrind. ;-) –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 14 '09 at 20:58
7  
You probably don't want to use a simple rand() with modulus. See: c-faq.com/lib/randrange.html –  Randy Proctor May 15 '09 at 13:02

Here's my adaptation of Ates Goral's answer using C++11. I've added the lambda in here, but the principle is that you could pass it in and thereby control what characters your string contains:

std::string random_string( size_t length )
{
    auto randchar = []() -> char
    {
        const char charset[] =
        "0123456789"
        "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"
        "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
        const size_t max_index = (sizeof(charset) - 1);
        return charset[ rand() % max_index ];
    };
    std::string str(length,0);
    std::generate_n( str.begin(), length, randchar );
    return str;
}

Here is an example of passing in a lambda to the random string function: http://ideone.com/Ya8EKf

Why would you use C++11?

  1. Because you can produce strings that follow a certain probability distribution (or distribution combination) for the character set you're interested in.
  2. Because it has built-in support for non-deterministic random numbers
  3. Because it supports unicode, so you could change this to an internationalized version.

For example:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <random>
#include <functional> //for std::function
#include <algorithm>  //for std::generate_n

typedef std::vector<char> char_array;

char_array charset()
{
    //Change this to suit
    return char_array( 
    {'0','1','2','3','4',
    '5','6','7','8','9',
    'A','B','C','D','E','F',
    'G','H','I','J','K',
    'L','M','N','O','P',
    'Q','R','S','T','U',
    'V','W','X','Y','Z',
    'a','b','c','d','e','f',
    'g','h','i','j','k',
    'l','m','n','o','p',
    'q','r','s','t','u',
    'v','w','x','y','z'
    });
};    

// given a function that generates a random character,
// return a string of the requested length
std::string random_string( size_t length, std::function<char(void)> rand_char )
{
    std::string str(length,0);
    std::generate_n( str.begin(), length, rand_char );
    return str;
}

int main()
{
    //0) create the character set.
    //   yes, you can use an array here, 
    //   but a function is cleaner and more flexible
    const auto ch_set = charset();

    //1) create a non-deterministic random number generator      
    std::default_random_engine rng(std::random_device{}());

    //2) create a random number "shaper" that will give
    //   us uniformly distributed indices into the character set
    std::uniform_int_distribution<> dist(0, ch_set.size()-1);

    //3) create a function that ties them together, to get:
    //   a non-deterministic uniform distribution from the 
    //   character set of your choice.
    auto randchar = [ ch_set,&dist,&rng ](){return ch_set[ dist(rng) ];};

    //4) set the length of the string you want and profit!        
    auto length = 5;
    std::cout<<random_string(length,randchar)<<std::endl;
    return 0;
}

Sample output.

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 void gen_random(char *s, const int len) {
     for (int i = 0; i < len; ++i) {
         int randomChar = rand()%(26+26+10);
         if (randomChar < 26)
             s[i] = 'a' + randomChar;
         else if (randomChar < 26+26)
             s[i] = 'A' + randomChar - 26;
         else
             s[i] = '0' + randomChar - 26 - 26;
     }
     s[len] = 0;
 }
share|improve this answer
    
Nice: this is independent of character set (at least for all character sets that have a..z,A..Z, and 0..9 continguous). –  dmckee Jan 13 '09 at 18:39
    
@dmckee: true, but what other character sets are those? (EBCDIC doesn't have contiguous letters). –  Greg Hewgill Jan 13 '09 at 18:44
    
Um. I guess I'm caught out. I was just parroting something a professor said to me once... –  dmckee Jan 13 '09 at 18:49
    
A quick check of the standard shows no such continuity requirements in section 2.2, where I'd expect them. –  David Thornley Jan 13 '09 at 20:50
1  
0..9 are required to be contiguous, though. no section number, but i'm sure about this. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 14 '09 at 4:43

I tend to always use the structured C++ ways for this kind of initialization. Notice that fundamentally, it's no different than Altan's solution. To a C++ programmer, it just expresses the intent a tad better and might be easier portable to other data types. In this instance, the C++ function generate_n expresses exactly what you want:

struct rnd_gen {
    rnd_gen(char const* range = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789")
        : range(range), len(std::strlen(range)) { }

    char operator ()() const {
        return range[static_cast<std::size_t>(std::rand() * (1.0 / (RAND_MAX + 1.0 )) * len)];
    }
private:
    char const* range;
    std::size_t len;
};

std::generate_n(s, len, rnd_gen());
s[len] = '\0';

By the way, read Julienne’s essay on why this calculation of the index is preferred over simpler methods (like taking the modulus).

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I just tested this, it works sweet and doesn't require a lookup table. rand_alnum() sort of forces out alphanumerics but because it selects 62 out of a possible 256 chars it isn't a big deal.

#include <cstdlib>   // for rand()
#include <cctype>    // for isalnum()   
#include <algorithm> // for back_inserter
#include <string>

char 
rand_alnum()
{
    char c;
    while (!std::isalnum(c = static_cast<char>(std::rand())))
        ;
    return c;
}


std::string 
rand_alnum_str (std::string::size_type sz)
{
    std::string s;
    s.reserve  (sz);
    generate_n (std::back_inserter(s), sz, rand_alnum);
    return s;
}
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5  
There is no way to know how long this function will take to run. It's very unlikely, but strictly speaking, this could run indefinitely. –  root.ctrlc Aug 14 '12 at 18:03

I've used the following in the past:

string RandomString(int len)
{
   srand(time(0));
   string str = "0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
   int pos;
   while(str.size() != len) {
    pos = ((rand() % (str.size() - 1)));
    str.erase (pos, 1);
   }
   return str;
}

int main()
{
   string random_str = RandomString(10);
   cout << "random_str : " << random_str << endl;
}
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Something even simpler and more basic in case you're happy for your string to contain any printable characters:

#include <time.h>   // we'll use time for the seed
#include <string.h> // this is for strcpy

void randomString(int size, char* output) // pass the destination size and the destination itself
{
    srand(time(NULL)); // seed with time

    char src[size];
    size = rand() % size; // this randomises the size (optional)

    src[size] = '\0'; // start with the end of the string...

    // ...and work your way backwards
    while(--size > -1)
        src[size] = (rand() % 94) + 32; // generate a string ranging from the space character to ~ (tilde)

    strcpy(output, src); // store the random string
}
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My 2p solution:

#include <chrono>
#include <random>
#include <string>

std::string random_string(size_t length)
{
    static const std::string alphanums =
        "0123456789"
        "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"
        "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";

    static std::mt19937 rg(std::chrono::system_clock::now().time_since_epoch().count());
    static std::uniform_int_distribution<> pick(0, alphanums.size() - 1);

    std::string s;

    s.reserve(length);

    while(length--)
        s += alphanums[pick(rg)];

    return s;
}
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string token(int len)
{
string t="";
for(int i=0;i<len;i++)
{
    switch(rand()%3)
    {
        case 0:
            t+=('0'+rand()%10);
            break;
        case 1:
            t+=('A'+rand()%26);
            break;
        case 2:
            t+=('a'+rand()%26);
            break;
    }
}
return t;
}
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