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Now I'm doing it by looping trhough a sorted vector, but maybe there is a faster way using internal R functions, and maybe I don't even need to sort.

vect = c(41,42,5,6,3,12,10,15,2,3,4,13,2,33,4,1,1)
vect = sort(vect)
print(vect)
outvect = mat.or.vec(length(vect),1)
outvect[1] = counter = 1
for(i in 2:length(vect)) {
    if (vect[i] != vect[i-1]) { counter = counter + 1 }
    outvect[i] = counter
}

    print(cbind(vect,outvect))

 vect outvect
 [1,]    1       1
 [2,]    1       1
 [3,]    2       2
 [4,]    2       2
 [5,]    3       3
 [6,]    3       3
 [7,]    4       4
 [8,]    4       4
 [9,]    5       5
[10,]    6       6
[11,]   10       7
[12,]   12       8
[13,]   13       9
[14,]   15      10
[15,]   33      11
[16,]   41      12
[17,]   42      13

The code is used to make charts with integers on the X axis instead of real data because for me distance between the X values is not important. So in my case the smallest x value is always 1. and the largest is always equal to how many X values are there.

-- edit: due to some misuderstanding about my question I added self sufficient code with output.

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1  
This question isn't clear as it's currently worded. What does your input data look like (csvdata)? What is the final product supposed to look like? Are you just trying to get a tabulation of the unique values in csvdata? If so, look at table() –  Chase Dec 9 '10 at 18:15
    
my data is matrix of numbers labelled X and Y, but only one column from csvdata is intersting to me here, that is X, and z is a new vector containing numbered values from csvdata[,'X'] –  rsk82 Dec 9 '10 at 18:23
    
sorry, but I do not see how factor is able to do what I need –  rsk82 Dec 9 '10 at 19:56
2  
@user393087 - what we have here is a failure to communicate. You haven't been able to verbalize in English, code, or pseudo code what it is you want to do. It obviously isn't that simple since you nobody really understands what you want. Maybe take a step back and describe your problem again, provide a sample input, and the desired output. Finally, any hints as to why you want to do this would be helpful, as there may be alternative methods which are simpler, more efficient, and will let you answer your real question more effectively. –  Chase Dec 9 '10 at 20:04
    
What I try to do I have arleady done and pasted code above in the question. And all I asked was is there a built in function for doing just that. This code that I pasted works!! I also provided input and output in the comment for post below. And I do not see the reason for all this negativity that is thrown at me. –  rsk82 Dec 9 '10 at 20:29
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That's more clear. Hence :

> vect = c(41,42,5,6,3,12,10,15,2,3,4,13,2,33,4,1,1)
> cbind(vect,as.numeric(factor(vect)))
 [1,]   41 12
 [2,]   42 13
 [3,]    5  5
 [4,]    6  6
 [5,]    3  3
 [6,]   12  8
 [7,]   10  7
 [8,]   15 10
 [9,]    2  2
[10,]    3  3
[11,]    4  4
[12,]   13  9
[13,]    2  2
[14,]   33 11
[15,]    4  4
[16,]    1  1
[17,]    1  1

No sort needed. And as said, see also ?factor

and if you want to preserve the order, then:

> cbind(vect,as.numeric(factor(vect,levels=unique(vect))))
      vect   
 [1,]   41  1
 [2,]   42  2
 [3,]    5  3
 [4,]    6  4
 [5,]    3  5
 [6,]   12  6
 [7,]   10  7
 [8,]   15  8
 [9,]    2  9
[10,]    3  5
[11,]    4 10
[12,]   13 11
[13,]    2  9
[14,]   33 12
[15,]    4 10
[16,]    1 13
[17,]    1 13
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Thank you very much, that is exactly it! –  rsk82 Dec 9 '10 at 21:11
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Joris solution is right on, but if you have a long vectors, it is a bit (3x) more efficient to use match and unique:

> x=sample(1e5, 1e6, replace=TRUE)
> # preserve order:
> system.time( a<-cbind(x, match(x, unique(x))) )
   user  system elapsed 
   0.20    0.00    0.22 
> system.time( b<-cbind(x, as.numeric(factor(x,levels=unique(x)))) )
   user  system elapsed 
   0.70    0.00    0.72 
> all.equal(a,b)
[1] TRUE
> 
> # sorted solution:
> system.time( a<-cbind(x, match(x, sort(unique(x)))) )
   user  system elapsed 
   0.25    0.00    0.25 
> system.time( b<-cbind(x, as.numeric(factor(x))) )
   user  system elapsed 
   0.72    0.00    0.72 
> all.equal(a,b)
[1] TRUE
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You can try this : (Note that you may want a different behaviour for repeated values. This will give each value a unique rank)

> x <- sample(size=10, replace=T, x=1:100)
> x1 <- vector(length=length(x))
> x1[order(x)] <- 1:length(x)
> cbind(x, x1)
       x x1
 [1,] 40  1
 [2,] 46  4
 [3,] 43  3
 [4,] 41  2
 [5,] 47  5
 [6,] 84 10
 [7,] 75  8
 [8,] 60  7
 [9,] 59  6
[10,] 80  9
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It looks like you are counting runs in the data, if that is the case, look at the rle function.

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No!. Can't you see from the provided code, that is so simple that I shoud say any words beside it. If you have vector 1,1,6,8,4,8 it gives 1,1,2,3,4,3 –  rsk82 Dec 9 '10 at 18:33
    
@user393087 -- how does it give 1, 1, 2, 3, 4, 3? How does counter decrease? You may get a better answer if you give the end goal, instead of a baby step. Sometimes there is function that wraps all the baby steps into one. –  Richard Herron Dec 9 '10 at 20:05
    
Here I must apologize for little misunderstanding. In first post I asked about a maybe build in function that is able to do this input and output without sorting which of course takes time. My code that I pasted Isn't able to do that, the vector or matrix must be sorted. And secont thing is tha I think now the example isn't illustrating what I thought. I tried to make it by had I made a mistake. I will post an actual output in just a minute. –  rsk82 Dec 9 '10 at 20:37
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You apparently want the results of something like table() but lined up next to the values: Try using the ave() function:

csvdata$counts <- ave(csvdata[, "X"], factor(csvdata[["X"]]), FUN=length)

The trick here is that the syntax of ave is a bit different than tapply because you put in an arbitrarily long set of factor arrguments and you need to put in the FUN= in front of the function because the arguments after triple dots are not process by order. They need to be named.

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print(ave(vect, factor(vect), FUN=length)) - gives: [1] 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - this is done over the vector I provided in (edited now) first post. So this is not it. –  rsk82 Dec 9 '10 at 20:59
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