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Why is this int switch valid:


public class Foo {
    private final static int ONE = 1;
    private final static int TWO = 2;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int value = 1;
        switch (value) {
            case ONE: break;
            case TWO: break;
        }
    }

}

While this enum switch is not:


import java.lang.annotation.RetentionPolicy;

public class Foo {
    private final static RetentionPolicy RT = RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME;
    private final static RetentionPolicy SRC = RetentionPolicy.SOURCE;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        RetentionPolicy value = RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME;
        switch (value) {
            case RT: break;
            case SRC: break;
        }
    }

}

I know that what goes in the case must be a constant, so why can I use a "final static int" as constant but not a "final static <your enum>"?

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2  
Why may I ask do you want to use the static var RT instead of just RUNTIME? –  dstarh Dec 9 '10 at 18:33
    
Because I have an enum Key {ZERO, ONE, TWO,...} that represent phone keys and depending on the context each key might mean one thing or another, so I declare constants with a more meaningful name, e.g. RETURN_TO_MAIN_MENU = Key.ZERO so that my switch cases are easer to understand by reading case RETURN_TO_MAIN_MENU: rather than case ZERO: –  pakman Dec 9 '10 at 21:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Because a case statement label must have either a compile time constant or an EnumConstantName. JLS 14.11

Compile time constants can only be strings and primitive types, as described by JLS 15.28. Thus you can not use a static final <your enum>, as it is neither a compile time constant, nor the name of an enum.

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The case argument must be primitive; it cannot be an object.

However, you can use enums as follows:

RetentionPolicy value = ...
switch (value) {
    case RUNTIME:
    case SOURCE:
}

Because value is declared to be of type RetentionPolicy you can use the enum constants directly inside the switch.

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RetentionPolicy is an enum. –  Buhake Sindi Dec 9 '10 at 18:36
    
How is that different from OP's code? –  Michael K Dec 9 '10 at 18:36
3  
@Michael: The OP used final static variables instead of direct references to the enum constants. –  Cameron Skinner Dec 9 '10 at 18:37
1  
@Elite: Er...yes? What is your question? –  Cameron Skinner Dec 9 '10 at 18:38
    
I misread your post.....sorry. –  Buhake Sindi Dec 9 '10 at 18:39

The compiler says

unqualified enumeration constant name required

So your value of RT would need to be RUNTIME instead of RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME to make your code work. But of course that is not possible. Why not use the RetentionPolicy enum directly? If you want to stick to your final static declaration, you need to assign the whole enum to your final static variable.

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Did not understood your response. If you want to know why I want to do that see the comment I added to my post. Thanks for answering though. –  pakman Dec 9 '10 at 21:45

Or simply use a if-elseif case :

private final static int ONE = 1;
private final static int TWO = 2;

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int value = 1;

    if(value.equals(ONE)){

    }
    else if(value.equals(ONE)){

    }

}
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