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This should be an easy one.

How to write a jquery function that gets the 'calling' object and some params.

My function code:

new function($) {
  $.fn.addcolor = function(param1, param2, param3, param4) {
    // here i would like to retrieve the 'caller' object (div.foo in this case)

  }
} (jQuery);

My code that 'calls' the function:

$('div.foo').click(function() {
  $(this).addcolor(1, 2, 3, 4);
});

I can get the params no problemo, but I want to get the content of the div.foo in the function and add some content it.

share|improve this question
    
Remove new from your wrapper function. –  SLaks Dec 9 '10 at 18:30
    
Not really an answer to my question. However now I am curious. :) Why should I remove new? –  PeeHaa Dec 9 '10 at 18:42
    
When I remove new i get an js error on the page: Uncaught Syntax Error Unexpected token ( –  PeeHaa Dec 9 '10 at 18:46
1  
It's more correct. new will create a new instance of your function (as a class), which is then discarded. –  SLaks Dec 9 '10 at 19:08
1  
@PeeHaa - It appears as though you're using the anonymous function like a constructor, which returns a new instance of the object it constructs. Only you have no need for the object, so it is just being discarded. I imagine this is more work behind the scenes than simply invoking an anonymous function and disregarding its undefined return value. EDIT: As Slaks noted above. –  user113716 Dec 9 '10 at 19:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're looking for this.

jQuery plugins in $.fn are normal methods on the $ prototype. (jQuery assigns $.fn to $.prototype)
Like any other method, you can get the context in which it was invoked using this.

share|improve this answer
    
OMG so easy. Shame on me for not trying! Thanks for nice explanation! –  PeeHaa Dec 9 '10 at 18:38

In your addcolor plugin, this will represent the same jQuery object against which your plugin was called.

 // v---jQuery object
$(this).addcolor(1, 2, 3, 4);

(function($) {
  $.fn.addcolor = function(param1, param2, param3, param4) {
    // here "this" is the same object
    // this[ 0 ] to get the first DOM element
    // this.each(function(...   to iterate over the collection
  }
})(jQuery);
share|improve this answer

In jQuery plugin functions that element is referenced by this.

function($) {
  $.fn.addcolor = function(param1, param2, param3, param4) {
    // here i would like to retrieve the 'caller' object (div.foo in this case)
    var divcontent = $(this).html();
  }
} (jQuery);
share|improve this answer
2  
There's no need to wrap $(this) inside the plugin since this is a reference to the jQuery object itself. –  user113716 Dec 9 '10 at 18:37
    
True, that call to jQuery can be avoided. With other variables I find it usually safer to wrap it just to make sure that I am actually handling a jQuery object though. –  Daff Dec 9 '10 at 18:55

this.whatever is one way...

There is also an arguments object that you can call. ie: arguments.length or arguments["parm"]

share|improve this answer

To extend jQuery I used:

(function($) {
    $.fn.extend({
        addcolor: function(param1, param2, param3, param4) {
            return this.empty().append(something);
        }
    });
})(jQuery);
share|improve this answer
    
What's the difference between your code and mine. (e.g. extend vs plugin name)? –  PeeHaa Dec 9 '10 at 18:40
1  
None, I'm just showing, that you could use 'this' in function. –  Pawel Zubrycki Dec 10 '10 at 11:43

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