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I've placed another html file beside index.html in /war. Lets call it foo.html. In development both http://127.0.0.1:8888/index.html and http://127.0.0.1:8888/foo.html are served. In production, foo.html returns "Error: NOT_FOUND". I checked file case. I tried adding it to as a welcome-file entry in web.xml.

What am I doing wrong that the static file foo.html isn't being deployed/served to/in production?

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1 Answer 1

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appengine-web.xml used to have this static-files section, which was only explicitly specifying static content.

<static-files>
    <include path="index.html" expiration="30d" />
    <include path="bitdual/**.cache.*" expiration="30d" />
    <include path="bitdual/js/*.js" expiration="30d" />
    <include path="votesmart/**.cache.*" expiration="30d" />
    <include path="votesmart/js/*.js" expiration="30d" />
    <include path="*.gif" expiration="30d" />
    <include path="*.png" expiration="30d" />
    <include path="*.html" expiration="7d" />
  </static-files>
  <resource-files>
    <include path="bitdual/*.gwt.rpc" />
    <include path="bitdual/*.nocache.*" />
    <include path="votesmart/*.gwt.rpc" />
    <include path="votesmart/*.nocache.*" />
  </resource-files>

I replaced it with the following, which is the newest default config generated. Note that it specifies the world as static first, then gets more specific.

<!-- Configure serving/caching of GWT files -->
  <static-files>
    <include path="**" />

    <!-- The following line requires App Engine 1.3.2 SDK -->
    <include path="**.nocache.*" expiration="0s" />

    <include path="**.cache.*" expiration="365d" />
    <exclude path="**.gwt.rpc" />
  </static-files>
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