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UPDATE (solution)

Months later someone turned me on to an awesome solution to this. If you install Git for Windows, it comes with this console app called Git Bash that does exactly what I descibed. I gather that it is derived from MSYS. It's easy and convenient and gives you all the Unix bash command line conveniences. Tab-completion works the way it does in bash (completes up to the point of ambiguity and doesn't try to guess beyond that forcing you to backspace out of an incorrect completion) and you can control-R to search command history, and history is preserved across restarts.


Can someone recommend a Windows XP program that provides a command line environment? I am an avid Cygwin user, but it doesn't solve my current problem. The problem with Cygwin that's tripping me up is that paths within the Cygwin environment are different from those under Windows, so some things I need to do are failing. My current project requires the Windows environment, not an alternate universe.

I've also considered PowerShell and Windows Services for Unix. I might try them later but for this project, I don't have time to learn a whole programming language that is PowerShell, and I suspect that WSU will have the same path problem as Cywin.

What I'm really looking for to solve my current problem is an app that gives me a Windows console but with some basic amenities added such as...

  • Tab-completion.
  • Being able to cut and paste text appearing in the window.
  • Search command history.
  • Being able to make the window wider than 80 chars.
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you can do everything in your list of 4 items except search in a dos prompt (xp, vista - and possibly with 2000 with some settings/download) –  Tim Jan 13 '09 at 19:19
    
Are you sure you can't solve your Cygwin / WSU path problems, even talking to the devs? –  Adriano Varoli Piazza Jan 13 '09 at 19:28
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For all that I think powershell is the way to go, if you know bash and you are really comfortable with it, resolving your path issue may be better for your individual case. –  EBGreen Jan 13 '09 at 19:34
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Problem I have with powershell is that it is wicked slow. –  James McMahon Jan 13 '09 at 20:23
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+1 for being constructive –  ceving Dec 3 '13 at 10:29
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closed as not constructive by Will Dec 6 '12 at 15:12

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17 Answers

up vote 237 down vote accepted

There is also Console: http://sourceforge.net/projects/console/ it is a replacement for the Windows console window and much more flexible (tabs, transparency, presets, etc) For a better tab completion you need a different command interpreter like 4nt / take command.


Alternatively, there is now ConEmu, another console replacement but more configurable and actively maintained than Console.

As for bash-style completion, recent builds of ConEmu integrate with Clink. More info on what Clink can do here. Or you can use TCC/LE with ConEmu. It also offers powerful bash-style completion plus a whole lot more.

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This is the only real answer to this question. –  mxcl Mar 14 '09 at 12:15
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Too bad it doesn't support easy window resizing. –  Milen A. Radev Jan 15 '10 at 12:00
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What do you mean Console2 doesn't support easy window resizing? I've been using it ever since I found out about it from this thread 6 months ago -- never had a problem resizing any windows. –  Noah Sussman Feb 22 '10 at 22:08
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I just downloaded it and it doesn't even allow me to maximize it. Why? –  devoured elysium Apr 14 '11 at 0:38
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I downloaded Console-2.00b148-Beta_32bit.zip, and it was a big fail. Couldn't easily figure out how to select text (why not just left-click?) and when I quit was treated to a cascade of Visual C++ Runtime Error! dialog boxes that forced me to hard-reboot. YMMV. –  noahlz Jan 19 '12 at 15:57
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The windows console provides the above features. Right click the title bar and choose properties. Select Quick Edit Mode and Insert Mode and command history on the options tab. Set your screen buffer and screen size on the layout tab. When you OK out modify shortcut that started that window and OK

K

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Could you clarify this sentence: "When you OK out modify shortcut that started that window and OK"? –  Ethan Jan 13 '09 at 19:06
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After changing the options and clicking OK. A dialog box will appear asking if you want the changes to apply to only this window, or to apply the changes to future windows with the same title. Selecting the latter will ensure you have the features next time you open the command prompt. –  Dillie-O Jan 13 '09 at 19:12
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One other note. While it isn't exactly "searching" the history, you can press the up arrow and get all previous commands you have entered. However, this only applies to the current command prompt window and the commands entered since it was opened. –  Dillie-O Jan 13 '09 at 19:14
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F7 shows your command prompt history in a handly little window –  Dynite Jan 13 '09 at 19:27
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F8 will search the command history for the latest command with a matching prefix to what you've already typed. –  Greg Hewgill Jan 13 '09 at 21:02
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Since spring this year (2010) there is also MinTTY included in standard Cygwin. Try this, it really convinced me (long term cmd and Console2 user). You don't need a running X server for it.

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Unfortunately, interactive shells built for windows, such as Python or Node do not work properly. –  mikerobi May 30 '12 at 16:16
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Yes, unfortunately, but some can be worked around: code.google.com/p/mintty/issues/detail?id=56#c12 –  Boldewyn May 31 '12 at 7:19
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I use Console2 with cmd.exe and/or a cygwin prompt. It's the bomb.

EDIT: started using it with TCC/LE (the modern-day incarnation of 4dos and 4nt), much better than cmd.exe and freeware.

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Ah! Just love when I'm SO'ed into awe. –  Frankie Nov 27 '10 at 4:19
    
Ive been using TCCLE and 4nt before it and 4dos before that, but recently tried the full Take Command for the tabs. Very nice but I'm not shelling out $99! So tried console2 with TCCLE, but it doesnt work! Causes C2 to start up with tiny non resizable window. If I start tcc.exe from a regular command line inside c2 (instead of at startup) then it creates a mirror window outside: everything i type/see happens inside c2 and in a standalone tccle window outside. Ideas? (Using W7 64bit) –  Rhubarb Apr 11 '12 at 16:23
    
@Rhubarb, I had similar problems but I don't remember what I did to work around them, it's been a while :-( –  orip Apr 11 '12 at 17:52
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been a while since I fixed it too and now I forget - but I think it was switching to the 32bit from the 64bit version of tccle, or vice versa, that made the difference –  Rhubarb Oct 10 '12 at 10:17
    
Console2 is cool as a freeware though it is not much stable. I am using FireCMD - brainasoft.com/firecmd –  Savdi May 26 '13 at 11:24
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We use an older product called 4NT, made by a company called JPSoft. While it's an older product, I believe it does everything you are looking for (except perhaps being able to make the window wider than 80 chars), plus a bit more.

JPSoft has replaced 4NT with a product that is now offered free-of-charge: Take Command Console LE. Despite being free, it does everything we need it to do. I would highly recommend it!

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Powershell is a new language, but it meets all of your requirements and the vast majority of the commands that you are familiar with form the regular command prompt work just fine in a powershell prompt as well.

Since working with the history is so handy, I thought that I would provide a demonstration scenario here. Lets say that you have a bunch of batch files that you run in a specific order as part of your build (don't know why you haven't wrapped them up in another bat yet, but that's your problem :P ). You did a build this morning and it is now 8 hours and a butt load of commands later and you want to run them again. You know that they are in a folder called C:\Dev\Build and that they are the only bats that you have run out of that folder this session. So, here is the commandline that would run them again in exactly the same order that you ran them the first time:

ghy | ?{$_.CommandLine -like "C:\Dev\Build\*.bat"} | %{ihy $_.ID}
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How about just pressing F7? –  imikay Oct 24 '12 at 6:14
    
That is certainly an option. In the scenario I presented however, it would not be unusual for me to have to sift through a couple hundred commands by hand using F7. –  EBGreen Oct 24 '12 at 13:08
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MinGW is a smaller version (fork) of cygwin. The MSYS console is a rxvt shell running bash that has access to the Windows path.

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There are two categories here - one is done by the console window, the other is done by shell that is running in the window

  • Being able to cut and paste text appearing in the window.
  • Being able to make the window wider than 80 chars.

This is done by the window, and other answers explain how to set up the normal Windows console to do it. Cur and Paste sort of work, except the console is not aware of line continuation, so lines that are wrapped come out as two lines. To get a better window, try something form Putty. (Edit: color me wrong - Putty still does not supply console window. Oh well, plenty other options in the answers here. And, in case it was not mentioned, there is this. Can't vouch for it personally, but it's out there.).

  • Tab-completion.
  • Search command history.

This is done by shell, cmd.exe. Tab completion works (as explained in other questions). Search command history is not there. Nor is command history preserved between sessions. YOu can get a better shell, such as bash.

Another edit: I completely forgot about the excellent emacs shell mode. In Windows, that runs cmd.exe and provides great console window. It even enhances the tab completion for you! You can learn about emacs for Windows here.

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You can do most of this with the Windows console.

  1. Open a console window
  2. Click on the Icon in the upper left
  3. Click Defaults
  4. Under Options check QuickEdit Mode and Insert Mode
  5. Under Font, select a size and font you like
  6. Under Layout, make the window bigger
  7. Change the colors if you like.

This will give you everything you asked for.

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Pretty sure that doesn't give the ability to search history. –  EBGreen Jan 13 '09 at 19:02
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To search history, type some characters and then F8. –  Greg Hewgill Jan 13 '09 at 21:03
    
Well that does work...sort of. It only works if you give it the beginning of the command. There is no wildcard support. On XP at least, it doesn't give you a list of results, it just cycles through the matches. –  EBGreen Jan 13 '09 at 21:18
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I'm pretty sure that Win XP has tab completion turned on by default, but Microsoft explains how to fiddle with that feature.

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Try rxvt. It comes with Cygwin and it is awesome.

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Just installed emacsW32 (http://ourcomments.org/Emacs/EmacsW32.html). Besides some serious editing I use the integrated shell to get some work done on DOS.

cu Roman

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Powershell seems to have taken the "let's give'em the feature, but make it as complicated as we can" route, re:history.

You have a history list, but it's not on by default IIRC, it's complicated to use (get-history followed by invoke-history ? WTF?) They've promised to get this better in future releases, but they always do that.

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It is on by default and get-history has a default alias of h. –  EBGreen Jan 13 '09 at 19:26
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Oh, and Invoke-History has a default alias of ihy. –  EBGreen Jan 13 '09 at 19:27
    
Nice. And F7, I read on another answer, shows a window with the current session's history. –  Adriano Varoli Piazza Jan 13 '09 at 19:32
    
That works for powershell or cmd. –  EBGreen Jan 13 '09 at 19:33
    
And F8 does a history search for commands starting with what you've already typed. –  Greg Hewgill Jan 13 '09 at 21:03
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Doing an insert in the Windows console is not enabled by enabling Quick Insert in the windows console. At least, I can't figure out what the key combination is to do an insert; it certainly isn't the insert key, and it isn't ctrl-v or alt-E-p.

There IS an undocumented key combination that will do insert in the windows console. I only know because about once a year, I accidentally bang my keyboard in a way that inserts the contents of the buffer into my Cygwin console window (which is just the MS-DOS console with bash running in it). I've never been able to recreate that and figure out what the key combination was.

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Please try Alternative Windows Console: https://sourceforge.net/projects/windowsconsole/

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Not bad. I couldn't get the putty plugin working. I think I'll be trying ConEmu. –  Tim Ludwinski May 1 '13 at 21:02
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I love powershell, and if you've got any experience with .Net, it's not so bad. I think that you will have to learn "a language" with any shell environment you choose.

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How about a good text editor like TextPad? It will give you many of the features you want and you can use whatever shell language you want. Textpad has some pretty nice command line integration features and compiler support.

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