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I have some doubts about usage of static method in Java. I read many places static variables are instance independent so be comes global.

public class ThirdClass {
    public static var = "Java";
}

public class Second {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ThirdClass ob1 = new ThirdClass();
        System.out.println(ob1.var);   // prints Java
        ob1.var="Ruby";
        ThirdClass ob2 = new ThirdClass();
        System.out.println(ob2.var);   // prints Ruby
    }
}

public class First {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ThirdClass ob3 = new ThirdClass();
        System.out.println(ob1.var);   // prints Java again!!!
    }
}

As you see in second class multiple instance of ThirdClass sharing same instance of variable var. But a separate instance in class First don't access the final value "Ruby" but show original "Java". It means the static variable are NOT global variable but only global to single execution!!!

Also do is creating static variable resource intensive compared to instance variable?

Please suggest.

share|improve this question
4  
global != persistent – OscarRyz Dec 9 '10 at 21:05
6  
Since some schmuck downvoted my legitimate answer that didn't directly answer your question, I'll leave it as a comment instead: Never, ever, EVER reference static members through an instance (ob2.var). It is a cardinal sin and leads to horrible misunderstandings/bugs in your code. – Mark Peters Dec 9 '10 at 21:09
    
I'd have to disagree that you shouldn't ever access static methods like that. What if you're passed a reference to the class to something else and you want to access its static members, but you don't know exactly what class it is? – Falmarri Dec 9 '10 at 21:13
    
Tks. I always access static variable by class name. Here i used just to show more clear that i am calling it through different instance and what's there printed value. – eternal Dec 9 '10 at 21:15
5  
@Falmarri: YOU CAN'T, that's the point. What you're describing IS the critical bug that would crop up if you thought it would virtually dispatch that method at runtime. – Mark Peters Dec 9 '10 at 21:17

It means the static variable are NOT global variable but only global to single execution!!!

Of course they are. All variables that are not persisted to some kind of storage (like the hard disk) do not retain their values between distinct executions of the program.

share|improve this answer
    
Tks. But the base of my problem is using similar code in big application on Jboss. Here the context was short as just main method. But in big application there is no main method so it means the updated value "Ruby" will remain in context till the application is deployed? – eternal Dec 9 '10 at 21:06
    
@eternal: There is only one instance of static variables, and the values are shared between all threads in the same environment. (A different process counts as a different environment.) – cdhowie Dec 9 '10 at 21:08
    
That's what i am trying to figure. The scope with in an application for static variable. Will it be same method call using this static variable!! – eternal Dec 9 '10 at 21:11
    
@cdhowie: That's not entirely true, especially when dealing with an application server like JBoss. There is only one instance of a static variable per loaded Class, and something like JBoss could easily load your class twice from disjoint ClassLoaders. – Mark Peters Dec 9 '10 at 21:11
1  
@cdhowie: I don't know the internals of JBoss. But you could definitely have two varying instances of ThirdClass.var loaded into the same JVM at the same time is my point, and it's definitely more relevant for containers. Maybe the OP was hoping to do some inter-application communication via a static variable. – Mark Peters Dec 9 '10 at 21:15

The value is initialized when the class is loaded. Therefore each time you execute the code, it is initialized to the value "Java" as is defined in the class. The new value is not saved, it is only changed in memory and is "reset" when the code is executed again.

The term global has nothing to do with the variables persistence, and scope is defined only within the running program.

share|improve this answer

@eternal I think I am getting the point you wanna ask. I tested this (with some minor compile changes) on Jboss. The results were: Once deployed the scope of class ThirdClass seems to be application deployment level. And the static value of var was retained while multiple method calls.

Here is the basic structure i used.

public class ThirdClass {
public static var = "Java";
}

public class Second class{

  public  void testA {
  ThirdClass ob1 = new ThirdClass();    // not needed , just kept for clarity.
  System.out.println(ThirdClass.var);   
  ThirdClass.var="Ruby";
  ThirdClass ob2 = new ThirdClass();        
  System.out.println(ThirdClass.var);  
} 

 public class First {

  public  void testB {
  ThirdClass ob3 = new ThirdClass(); 
  System.out.println(ThirdClass.var); 
   ThirdClass.var="CSHARP";

 }

 public  void testC {
 ThirdClass ob4 = new ThirdClass(); 
 System.out.println(ThirdClass.var);        

} 

By webservices calls ( i have a setup) called these methods in secquence testA() --> Display var = "Ruby"

testB() --> Display var = "Ruby"

testC() --> Display var ="CSHARP"

So the new changed values were shared by DIFFERENT METHOD CALLS throught application deployment. So scope of ThirdClass was deployment level.

share|improve this answer

Static variables are "per class". So it doesn't matter if your static variable in this class has same name/type as some other.

It's global in the sense that no matter how many object of that class you have, if you have them use a static variable, they'll all be using one var.

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You have two different mains, meaning it will have 2 different execution paths. You either start with one or with the other, the value of the changed static variable is only changed for the current execution, on a different execution it always reset to the default value.

Try not to have a second main but rather a static method and then call it on the first main after the change, you will see a different result then.

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