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I need some code to be triggered if any error occurs. Basically I need a finally block which executes only in case of an exception. I would implement it this way:

HttpURLConnection post(URL url, byte[] body) throws IOException {
    HttpURLConnection connection = url.openConnection();
    try {
        OutputStream out = connection.getOutputStream();
        try {
            out.write(body);
        } finally {
            out.close();
        }
        return connection;
    } catch (Throwable t) {
        connection.disconnect();
        throw t;
    }
}

Looks fine—except it won't compile: my function cannot throw Throwable.

I could re-write:

    } catch (RuntimeException e) {
        connection.disconnect();
        throw e;
    } catch (IOException e) {
        connection.disconnect();
        throw e;
    }

But even then I'm a) missing all Errors and b) have to fix this code any time I change my implementation to throw different types of exceptions.

Is it possible to handle this generically?

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4  
Aren't checked exceptions just fantastic? – cdhowie Dec 9 '10 at 22:57
    
@cdhowie: I also dislike checked exceptions, but this is really a case of Error and Throwable being checked but not checked; nothing in the runtime declares "throws XxxError", but if you try to (re)throw XxxError suddenly it's checked - HUH?? What's up with that? Checked exceptions should have been done with a CheckedException abstract subclass of Throwable which is checked by the compiler, not the current "magic" - of course that enables me to rethrow a checked exception as a Throwable, but I'm not sure that's such a bad thing. – Lawrence Dol Dec 10 '10 at 1:55
    
@Software Monkey: actually Error is not checked—I just checked that. :) You can definitely catch and re-throw Error without mentioning it in the throws clause. It would add another case to my solution though, making it even less maintainable. The reality is, instead of CheckedException Java goes with two unchecked trees, RuntimeException and Error, with everything else being checked. – SnakE Dec 10 '10 at 3:55
    
Fair enough; Throwable is itself still broken, though. (I've never actually tried to catch and rethrow an Error, sensibly enough). – Lawrence Dol Dec 10 '10 at 4:28
up vote 11 down vote accepted

You could use a finally block, and add a flag to indicate success.

bool success = false;
try {
    //your code
    success = true;
    return retVal;
} finally {
    if (!success) {
        //clean up
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is definitely much better than my listing of exception types. I'll stick to this solution for now—too bad it's not a language construct. – SnakE Dec 9 '10 at 23:52

Throwable has two subclasses, Error and Exception. Javadocs for Error say:

An Error is a subclass of Throwable that indicates serious problems that a reasonable application should not try to catch. Most such errors are abnormal conditions. The ThreadDeath error, though a "normal" condition, is also a subclass of Error because most applications should not try to catch it.

So unless this is a truly unusual situtation, you can just focus on Exception:

catch (IOException e) {
    connection.disconnect();
    throw e;
}
catch (RuntimeException e) {
    connection.disconnect();
    throw e;
}
catch (Exception e) {
    connection.disconnect();
    throw new IOException(e);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Updated to account for only throwing IOException – Brad Mace Dec 9 '10 at 23:15
    
Wrapping everything in IOException doesn't look like a good idea to me. Any ArrayOutOfBounds will end up as IO this way. You're right that Errors are more exceptional than Exceptions, but the finally block works for everything transparently without changing the exception type. I'd like to replicate this behavior as close as possible. – SnakE Dec 9 '10 at 23:31
    
@SnakE - The finally technique doesn't have to wrap because it doesn't allow any other exception types besides IOException (and RuntimeException, but RuntimeException could also be pulled out into its own block). If you don't need to support other exception types, you could drop the generic Exception block from my example. – Brad Mace Dec 9 '10 at 23:37
    
The finally technique works for ever-y-thing and that's a huge benefit. You write it once and it's always correct no matter how you change the method body or throws signature, or which Throwables suddenly decide to pass through. – SnakE Dec 10 '10 at 0:54
    
If the finally technique works for your situation, that's fine (and you should accept that answer then). But it's not the magic cure-all you seem to think. If you added code to your post method that throws, for example, a ParseException, the compiler would complain about an uncaught exception, just like it would if there were no try/catch/finally blocks. That's where the wrapping technique I showed comes in. – Brad Mace Dec 10 '10 at 15:53

Unless I am mistaken an Exception would not need a finally block to stop execution and do something you need, like clean up or error mitigation.

try {
  // Do some work! 
  // Fail
} catch (IOException e) {
  // Clean up, alert user, expected error
} catch (Exception e) {
  // Not so much expected, but lets try to handle this
}

The errors should come from your implemented classes and methods which are basically your ideas. Think about the flow of execution and the propagation of errors. If your method above doesn't catch a particular exception then whatever called it will see the exception.

Throwable is just a top level class with subclasses. Exception being generally a catch all. And remember you can also implement your own exceptions to handle task.

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