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I have a class to which I add attribute accessors dynamically at runtime. This class forms part a DSL, whereby blocks get passed to configuration methods and invoked using instance_eval. This makes it possible in the DSL to remove references to 'self' when referencing methods of the class.

However, I've discovered that I can reference the attributes to retrieve their values, but am unable to assign them, unless explicity referencing self, as the following code sample illustrates.

class Bar

  def add_dynamic_attribute_to_class(name)
    Bar.add_dynamic_attribute(name)
  end

  def invoke_block(&block)
    instance_eval &block
  end

  def self.add_dynamic_attribute(name)
    attr_accessor name
  end

end

b = Bar.new

b.add_dynamic_attribute_to_class 'dyn_attr'

b.dyn_attr = 'Hello World!'

# dyn_attr behaves like a local variable in this case
b.invoke_block do
  dyn_attr = 'Goodbye!'
end

# unchanged!
puts "#{b.dyn_attr} but should be 'Goodbye!'"

# works if explicitly reference self
b.invoke_block do
  self.dyn_attr = 'Goodbye!'
end

# changed...
puts "#{b.dyn_attr} = 'Goodbye!"

# using send works
b.invoke_block do
  send 'dyn_attr=', 'Hello Again'
end

# changed...
puts "#{b.dyn_attr} = 'Hello Again!"

# explain this... local variable or instance method?
b.invoke_block do

  puts "Retrieving... '#{dyn_attr}'"

  # doesn't fail... but no effect
  dyn_attr = 'Cheers'

end

# unchanged
puts "#{b.dyn_attr} should be 'Cheers'"

Can anyone explain why this isn't behaving as expected?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The issue arrises with the way that Ruby deals with instance and local variables. What is happening is that you are setting a local variable in your instance_eval block, rather than using the ruby accessor.

This might help explain it:

class Foo
  attr_accessor :bar

  def input_local
    bar = "local"
    [bar, self.bar, @bar, bar()]
  end

  def input_instance
    self.bar = "instance"
    [bar, self.bar, @bar, bar()]
  end

  def input_both
    bar = "local"
    self.bar = "instance"
    [bar, self.bar, @bar, bar()]
  end
end

foo = Foo.new
foo.input_local #["local", nil, nil, nil]
foo.input_instance #["instance", "instance", "instance", "instance"]
foo.input_both #["local", "instance", "instance", "instance"]

The way bocks work is that they distinguish between local and instance variables, but if a local variable is not defined when it's reader is called, the class defaults to the instance variable (as is the case with the call to input_instance in my example).

There are three ways to get the behavior you want.

Use instance variables:

    class Foo
      attr_accessor :bar

      def evaluate(&block)
        instance_eval &block
      end
    end

    foo = Foo.new
    foo.evaluate do
      @bar = "instance"
    end
    foo.bar #"instance"

Use a self variable:

    class Foo
      attr_accessor :bar

      def evaluate(&block)
        block.call(self)
      end
    end

    foo = Foo.new
    foo.evaluate do |c|
      c.bar = "instance"
    end
    foo.bar #"instance"

Use setter functions:

    class Foo
      attr_reader :bar
      def set_bar value
        @bar = value
      end

      def evaluate(&block)
        instance_eval &block
      end
    end

    foo = Foo.new
    foo.evaluate do
      set_bar "instance"
    end
    foo.bar #"instance"

All of these examples set foo.bar to "instance".

share|improve this answer
    
I don't fully understand; you say that ruby classes distinguish between local and instance variables, but the issue is with accessor methods. i.e. bar != @bar != bar() != bar=(). –  VirtualStaticVoid Dec 10 '10 at 21:48
    
BTW: I've managed to get around the issue by implementing a method called "config", which returns self, on the class, so that my DSL reads better (i.e instead of using self.* it now has config.*) –  VirtualStaticVoid Dec 10 '10 at 21:56
3  
I've updated the post with more details. The issue is that you are unknowingly setting a local variable rather than an instance varaible. To be more precise, bar == @bar == bar() == self.bar if a local variable named bar is not defined. Otherwise bar != @bar == bar() == self.bar if a local variable named bar is defined. To be safe, don't define local variables named "bar" or only use the other methods. –  Pan Thomakos Dec 11 '10 at 18:28

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