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How can we check if a file Exists or not using Win32 program?

Which is the best method for checking for file existence:

Option1:

GetFileAttributes("C:\\MyFile.txt"); // from winbase.h
if(0xffffffff == GetFileAttributes("C:\\MyFile.txt"))
{
    //File not found
}

Option2:

std::string fileName("C:\\MyFile.txt" );
ifstream fin( fileName.c_str() );

if( fin.fail() )
{
    //File not found
}

Also if you think option 1 is the better method, can you tell me how to define 0xffffffff as a constant (I don't want to use #define)

Thanks

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marked as duplicate by Adrian McCarthy, DocMax, BЈовић, Piperoman, kmp Dec 20 '12 at 7:58

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
You might need a better understanding of the language of your choosing before digging into libraries. This however does not mean, that one does not learn from other peoples code (i.e. libraries). –  Marcus Fritzsch Dec 9 '10 at 23:03
3  
The second one does not test whether the file exists; it tests whether the fine can be opened. (The first one might be the same; I don't know off the top of my head what the behavior of GetFileAttributes is.) –  James McNellis Dec 9 '10 at 23:03
    
maybe here too: stackoverflow.com/questions/2903360/… –  karlphillip Dec 9 '10 at 23:05
    
Re Dups: Yep they are useful but I specifically wanted to know which of the options in my ques I should choose - the existing questions don't answer that. –  David Relihan Dec 10 '10 at 0:22

11 Answers 11

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Note that GetFileAttributes() may fail for other reasons than lack of existence (for example permissions issues). I would add a check on the error code for robustness:

GetFileAttributes("C:\\MyFile.txt"); // from winbase.h
if(INVALID_FILE_ATTRIBUTES == GetFileAttributes("C:\\MyFile.txt") && GetLastError()==ERROR_FILE_NOT_FOUND)
{
    //File not found
}
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This does not handle the case when the path is a directory. Here's how: DWORD fileType = GetFileAttributes("C:\\Windows"); bool isDir = fileType & FILE_ATTRIBUTE_DIRECTORY; –  3noch Mar 21 '13 at 13:28
    
When I try this I find that many non-existent files are reported as existing. Although GetFileAttributes() returns INVALID..., GetLastError() does not report the NOT_FOUND error. –  OldPeculier Aug 7 '13 at 14:51
2  
@OldPeculier, Boost Filesystem uses the following error codes as indicators that the path does not exist: ERROR_FILE_NOT_FOUND, ERROR_PATH_NOT_FOUND, ERROR_INVALID_NAME, ERROR_INVALID_DRIVE, ERROR_NOT_READY, ERROR_INVALID_PARAMETER, ERROR_BAD_PATHNAME, ERROR_BAD_NETPATH. –  Alex Che yesterday

If you're targeting only Windows, option #1 is clearly the better of the two. Also, the constant you're looking for already exists in the Windows headers -- it's called INVALID_FILE_ATTRIBUTES.

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So is #define INVALID_FILE_ATTRIBUTES ((DWORD)-1) equivalent to 0xffffffff? It seems like 0xffffffff is defined already as #define INVALID_FILE_SIZE ((DWORD)0xFFFFFFFF)? –  David Relihan Dec 13 '10 at 12:05
    
@David Relihan: Yes, they're equivalent; since DWORD is unsigned, -1 is the same as the largest positive value which is 0xFFFFFFFF. –  casablanca Dec 13 '10 at 15:17

I would prefer the first. The second checks if the file can be opened, while a file might exist without you having the rights to open it.

You can use the INVALID_FILE_ATTRIBUTES constant.

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How about use boost?

if (!boost::filesystem::exists("C:\\MyFile.txt"))
{
    ...
}

http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_43_0/libs/filesystem/doc/index.htm

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4  
boost::filesystem::exists(...) calls GetFileAttributes() on Windows. –  Seth Dec 29 '11 at 0:27

There are two things to consider here:

  1. Checking if the file exists via its attributes is potentially many orders of magnitude faster - If a file exists on a 'slow' file system - tape, network storage, cd etc then opening the file will involve an actual round trip to the files location. The files attributes on the other hand are queried and cached by the filesystem drivers when the directory is queried, so probing file attributes involves a once off directory enumeration cost - meaning far fewer round trips - which can be a significant saving if multiple "slow" files are being checked.

  2. However, the files attributes merely indicate that the file existed at the time the call was made. The file can be deleted, or you might not haver permissions to access it. If you are about to try and open the file anyway, it would be better to dispense with the file attributes check and actually try and open the file.

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The only robust way to check whether a file exists is to try to open it, and see if it succeeds or fails.

Any other method is a potential race condition. For example, GetFileAttributes can tell you if a file existed when you called the function, but that's not the same as whether it exists when you try to open it. It might have been deleted (or created) in the meantime.

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There's a nice shell utility function for that, PathFileExists.

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Note that this returns true even if the string is not a file, but instead a directory. –  sean e Dec 13 '10 at 15:58

I'd opt to use the iostream because of its platform independence. True, you may be targeting Windows only, but it's never a bad move to use platform-independent libraries. If you're building a big project, you never know what that next phase will entail.

I'm not sure the code above is the best (or correct) way to check for file existence. Try this:

ifstream f;
f.open(str);

if (f.is_open()) {
  // read file
}
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Back in the day, all we had was OpenFile (and we were GRATEFUL)

OFSTRUCT of = {0};
of.cBytes = sizeof(of);

HFILE hf = ::OpenFile("c:\\windows\\write.exe",&of,OF_EXIST);

if(hf > 0)
    printf("file exists"); 

return 0;
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I also like to confirm that the string isn't a directory:

DWORD attr = GetFileAttributes(file);
if(attr == INVALID_FILE_ATTRIBUTES || (attr & FILE_ATTRIBUTE_DIRECTORY))
    return false;   //  not a file
return true;
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Once again that constant is already defined -- FILE_ATTRIBUTE_DIRECTORY. –  casablanca Dec 9 '10 at 23:40
    
Updated, thanks - the original code used CFile::directory and a quick search didn't turn up the right substitute. –  sean e Dec 10 '10 at 0:26
#include <iostream>
#include <windows.h>
using namespace std;

bool FileExists(const TCHAR *fileName)
{
    DWORD       fileAttr;

    fileAttr = GetFileAttributes(fileName);
    if (0xFFFFFFFF == fileAttr && GetLastError()==ERROR_FILE_NOT_FOUND)
        return false;
    return true;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{


    if ( FileExists("testtt.txt"))
    {
      cout << "File exists \n";
    }
    else
    {
        cout << "File does not exist \n";

    }


  return 0;
}
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