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High level I have two tables that need to have some of the data mirrored. I can't go through and change all of the code to write to both so I thought I'd use a SQL trigger to insert data into the 2nd table anytime data is inserted into the 1st. Here is where I am stuck:

CREATE TRIGGER new_trigger_INSERT
ON old_table
FOR INSERT
INSERT INTO new_table (id, first_name, last_name)
VALUES () --This is where I'm lost, I need to insert some of the data from the insert that executed this trigger

Any help is appreciated, also if there is a better way to accomplish this let me know.

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up vote 9 down vote accepted

Use the 'inserted' table:

CREATE TRIGGER new_trigger_INSERT 
ON old_table 
FOR INSERT 
INSERT INTO new_table (id, first_name, last_name) 
SELECT col1, col2, col3 FROM inserted

[PS: Don't forget to ensure your triggers handle multiple rows...]

Ref. Create Trigger

Good article: Exploring SQL Server Triggers

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Thanks I didn't realize those tables existed. What do you mean by ensuring the trigger handles multiple rows? – jon3laze Dec 9 '10 at 23:41
6  
@jon3laze: a common mistake made by a lot of "trigger newbies" is to assume the trigger will be fired once for each row inserted - hence they assume the "Inserted" table will only contain a single row. This is not the way it works - if you insert a batch of 50 rows, your INSERT trigger will be fired once for the whole batch, and the "Inserted" table will contain 50 rows - you need to be able to deal with that scenario – marc_s Dec 10 '10 at 6:18

In the triggers you have "inserted" and "deleted" tables. In this case you only use the "inserted" table, but in update trigger you use both.

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