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I can launch an xterm from the command line (or a program, via a system call) like so:

/usr/X11/bin/xterm -fg SkyBlue -bg black -e myscript

That will launch an xterm with blue text and a black background, and run an arbitrary script inside it.

My question: How do I do the equivalent with Terminal.app?

ADDED: The accepted answer pretty much solves this (thanks Juha!) but prints some extraneous stuff (the list of window IDs) to stdout. Also, as Juha points out, it's using an ugly hack in continuously polling all the Terminal windows.

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I suppose one way to do this would be to create multiple versions of ~/Library/Preferences/com.apple.Terminal.plist and then launch Terminal with the appropriate one. Can the plist file be specified on the command line? –  dreeves Dec 10 '10 at 3:24
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4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Almost all (every?) osx program can be launched from command line using:

appName.app/Contents/MacOS/command

For terminal the command is:

/Applications/Utilities/Terminal.app/Contents/MacOS/Terminal

You can use the autocomplete (tab) or ls to find the correct filenames. ".app" is basically a folder.

To change the colors and run a script... I think you cannot do it with shell scripts as Terminal does not accept arguments ("Terminal myScript.sh" does not launch myScript). With iTerm this works.

Workaround is to use applescript (wrapped in a shell script):

   #!/bin/sh
   osascript -e '
     tell application "Terminal"
       activate
       tell window 1
          do script "sleep 5; exit"
          set background color to {0, 11111, 11111}
          set win_id to id
       end tell

       set w_ids to (id of every window)

       repeat while w_ids contains win_id
         delay 1
         set w_ids to (id of every window)
       end repeat
    end tell'

Ok, now it should behave exactly the same as the xterm example. The drawback is the constant polling of the window ids (which is bad programming).

edit: A bit more elegant applescript would use the 'busy' property of Terminal. I will leave the original code as is works for a general program (not just terminal).

tell application "Terminal"
    tell window 1
        do script "sleep 2"
        set background color to {0, 11111, 11111}
        repeat while busy
            delay 1
        end repeat
        close
    end tell
end tell

Also for perfectly correct program, one should check that whether the terminal is running or not. It affects the number of windows opened. So, this should be run first (again a nasty looking hack, that I will edit later as I find a working solution).

tell application "System Events"
    if (count (processes whose name is "Terminal")) is 0 then
        tell application "Terminal"
            tell window 1
                close
            end tell
        end tell
    end if
end tell

br,
Juha

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This seems to do the trick. Thanks so much, Juha! –  dreeves Dec 11 '10 at 2:02
    
One difference I just found between this and the xterm equivalent: calling this shell script returns immediately, not waiting for the command ("echo boo" in your example) to finish. Do you know how to make it wait? Thanks again! –  dreeves Dec 11 '10 at 10:28
    
@dreeves: Ah, you can change "script" to "shell script" and drop the "with command". I edit the answer a bit... –  Juha Dec 13 '10 at 11:31
    
@Juha: Thanks for the fix! I'm within epsilon now and can probably figure this out for myself but do you know offhand how to prevent the script from outputting the list of window ids? (I'm also thinking this may all be a bit too ugly and I should suck it up and make a proper Cocoa app rather than all this hackery with launching scripts in Terminals!) –  dreeves Dec 16 '10 at 0:47
    
I added an alternative script that is more elegant (does not use ids). –  Juha Dec 22 '10 at 11:22
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You can open an app by bundle id too, and give other parameters.

If there's an executable script test.sh in the current directory, the following command will open and run it in Terminal.app

 open -b com.apple.terminal test.sh 

The only down side that I can find is that Terminal doesn't appear to inherit your current environment, so you'll have to arrange another way to pass parameters through to the script that you want to run. I guess building the script on the fly to embed the parameters would be one approach (taking into account the security implications of course...)

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1  
This doesn't directly address the colour question, but it's a better way to launch an existing shell script in a Terminal window. –  Sam Deane Oct 19 '11 at 11:32
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You can also go into terminal GUI, completely configure the options to your heart's content, and export them to a ".terminal" file, and/or group the configurations into a Window Group and export that to a terminal file "myGroup.terminal". Then

open myGroup.terminal

will open the terminal(s) at once, with all your settings and startup commands as configured.

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you can launch terminal with the following command, not sure how to specify colors:

 open /Applications/Utilities/Terminal.app/
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