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I'm not an XSLT wizard.

I have the current XSLT i'm using to remove empty nodes:

 string strippingStylesheet = "<xsl:stylesheet version=\"1.0\" xmlns:xsl=\"http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform\">" +
                "<xsl:template match=\"@*|node()\">" +
                "<xsl:if test=\". != ''\">" +
                "<xsl:copy>" + 
                "<xsl:apply-templates select=\"@*|node()\"/>" +
                "</xsl:copy>" + 
                "</xsl:if></xsl:template></xsl:stylesheet>";

I need to find a way to also remove nodes with -1 in them. A previous developer thought it would be a good idea to make every int in the system be defaulted to -1, and yes that means all DB fields have -1 in them instead of null.

So as much as I want to beat the dead horse (with a stick, bat, bazooka), I need to get back to work and get this done.

Any help would be great.

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Good question, +1. See my answer for an appropriate definition of "empty node" and for a complete but very short solution. :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 10 '10 at 2:41
2  
Another solution is simply to change your line "<xsl:if test=\". != ''\">" to "<xsl:if test=\". != '' and . != -1\">". –  LarsH Dec 10 '10 at 7:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

I have the current XSLT i'm using to remove empty nodes:

. . . . . . . . .

I need to find a way to also remove nodes with -1 in them

I guess that it is required to remove all "empty nodes".

The processing depends on the definition of "empty node". One reasonable definition in your case is: Any element that doesn't have attributes and children or doesn't have attributes and has only one child that is a text node with value -1.

For this definition here is a simple solution.

This transformation:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
  <xsl:copy>
   <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
  </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="*[not(@*) and not(*) and (not(text()) or .=-1)]"/>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when applied on this sample XML document:

<t>
 <a>-1</a>
 <a>2</a>
 <b><c/></b>
 <d>-1</d>
 <d>15</d>
 <e x="1"/>
 <f>foo</f>
</t>

produces the wanted, correct result:

<t>
   <a>2</a>
   <b/>
   <d>15</d>
   <e x="1"/>
   <f>foo</f>
</t>
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1  
I think maybe instead of and not(text() or .=-1) you meant and (not(text()) or . = -1)) ... right? Which explains why nodes containing only -1 are showing up in your output. –  LarsH Dec 10 '10 at 7:03
    
@LarsH: Thanks for noticing this. Was quite tired last night when writing the answer. Fixed now. –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 10 '10 at 13:49

In simple case this should work:

<xsl:template match="@*|node()">
    <xsl:copy>
        <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/>
    </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>     

<xsl:template match="*[. = '' or . = '-1']"/>

With this simple input:

<root>
    <node></node>
    <node>-1</node>
    <node>2</node>
    <node>8</node>
    <node>abc</node>
    <node>-1</node>
    <node></node>
    <node>99</node>
</root>

Result will be:

<root>
    <node>2</node>
    <node>8</node>
    <node>abc</node>
    <node>99</node>
</root>
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