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Edit:
*Note: I'm using PHP 5.2 for the time being, unfortunately. I can't find a decent cheap host offering 5.3...


In PHP, self refers to the class in which the called method is defined. This means that if you don't override a method in the child class, the keyword self will refer to the parent class, even when called from the child.

For example, this code:

<?php

class ParentClass {
  const NAME = "ParentClass";
  public function showName() {
    echo self::NAME . "<br />\n";
  }
}

class ChildClass extends ParentClass {
  const NAME = "ChildClass";
  public function __construct() {
    echo self::NAME . "<br />\n";
  }
}

$test = new ChildClass();
$test->showName();

?>

Will create this output:

ChildClass
ParentClass

What I want to do is to create a default method (e.g. showName() in the example above) which exists in a parent class with constants defining default values to use. In the child, I want to be able to override these constants (note the const in the child definition above), and have those values be used when I call the method on an instance of the child.

In short, how can I make it so that the output of the above sample would be...

ChildClass
ChildClass

...without having to duplicate the code of the parent within the child?

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I use ServerGrove and they offer 5.3 hosting for a reasonable price. –  CaseySoftware Dec 10 '10 at 2:52
    
@CaseySoftware: Bookmarked, thanks. I'll have to check out some reviews for it, etc. but it looks promising. I've been planning to go with WebFaction, but the price difference doesn't look substantial. WF does do 5.3, but they do it by running another Apache under your account, eating RAM, etc. - not necessarily what I want. –  AgentConundrum Dec 10 '10 at 3:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I believe the according syntactic salt for your case is:

print constant(get_class($this)."::NAME");
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Beautiful! Well, at least less hideous than it could be. Thanks! –  AgentConundrum Dec 10 '10 at 0:52
2  
For people looking for a php5.3 and above solution, you can use static:: keyword instead of self::. –  phemios Jan 28 at 13:39

Try

function showName() {
   return static::NAME;
}

This uses late static binding:

As of PHP 5.3.0, PHP implements a feature called late static bindings which can be used to reference the called class in a context of static inheritance.

More precisely, late static bindings work by storing the class named in the last "non-forwarding call". In case of static method calls, this is the class explicitly named (usually the one on the left of the :: operator); in case of non static method calls, it is the class of the object. A "forwarding call" is a static one that is introduced by self::, parent::, static::, or, if going up in the class hierarchy, forward_static_call(). The function get_called_class() can be used to retrieve a string with the name of the called class and static:: introduces its scope.

EDIT: For 5.2.x

If you don't have 5.3.0 you won't be able to take advantage of this. One common hack solution is to create a static cache (e.g. private static $statics = array()) referenced by child class name. It requires you to track object inheritance to override the value on __construct, and to explicitly define which statics are 'inheritable'. For example, SilverStripe uses this technique in the Sapphire ORM to get around PHP static binding limitations. They define a base Object class, and various static var management functions.

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I should have been more clear, I'm limited to PHP 5.2 for the time being. 5.3 doesn't have good availability on shared hosts yet. –  AgentConundrum Dec 10 '10 at 0:32
    
Why this works with constant, while it's name suggests in a context of static inheritance? –  Hendra Uzia Dec 10 '13 at 10:26

Maybe it's just because of your short example but the "self" referencing doesn't seem needed.

I would just do this:

class ParentClass {
  public function showName() {
    echo $this->name() . "<br />\n";
  }

  public static function name() {
    return "ParentClass";
  }
}

class ChildClass extends ParentClass {
  public function __construct() {
    echo $this->name() . "<br />\n";
  }
  public static function name() {
    return "ChildClass";
  }
}

$test = new ChildClass();
$test->showName();

Output:

ChildClass
ChildClass
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