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I've started using this pattern in JavaScript. I'm not sure if I read about it specifically, or if I just conjured it up one day.

The format is...

var name = (function() {

    var init = function() {
       // Init something
       $('a').click(show);
    };

    var show = function() {
       // Show something
    };

    $(init);

})();

And here is a real world example...

var contactForm = (function() {
    var init = function() {

         if ( ! $('body').hasClass('contact')) {
            return;
         };

         var form = $('.contact #content form');

         form.validate({
              rules: {
                  'full-name': {
                      required: true
                  },    
                  'email': {
                      required: true,
                      email: true
                  },    
              },
              messages: {
                  'email': {
                      email: 'Please make sure this email is valid.'
                  }

          }
          }); 

    };

    $(init);

})();

Is there anything wrong with this?

share|improve this question
    
Why use the variables (name, contactForm) since you do not return anything from the function (and you call it immediately)? Why not just skip that part completely? or is it as a bookmark for you ? –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Dec 10 '10 at 1:34
    
@Gaby Just so I can clearly see what each function does, and it helps with debugging. I guess they could be comments, but then my stack trace would show some unnamed functions. –  alex Dec 10 '10 at 1:35
2  
got it. Nifty concept. –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Dec 10 '10 at 1:38

3 Answers 3

No YUI actually call this the Module pattern and uses it in alot of their code.

You might even do the following within the anonymous function.

name = new init();
share|improve this answer

No. I actually do almost the same thing, but why are you calling $(init) instead of just init()?

share|improve this answer
    
Because I am using jQuery, and want it to be fired on DOM ready. –  alex Dec 10 '10 at 1:26
    
Ah. I'm used to doing things a little differently and assumed you'd be wrapping multiple blocks within a single $(function() {}) call. Shame on me. Continue. :) –  simshaun Dec 10 '10 at 1:28

Looks like a jQuery plugin written as a IIFE (Immediately Invoked Function Expression). You don't really need the var name = (extra global variable) and passing in the jQuery object is best practice in case of $.noConflict(). See Ben Alman's jquery-plugin-authoring talk for this and other interesting info.

(function($) {

    var init = function() {
       // Init something
       $('a').click(show);
    };

    var show = function() {
       // Show something
    };

    $(init);

})(jQuery);
share|improve this answer

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