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Integer.toString(int);

and

String.valueOf(int);

Which one among the above two methods is the efficient way of converting an int to String?

Thanks in advance.

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It doesn't matter. –  Anon. Dec 10 '10 at 3:38
1  
It's hard to say which is more efficient, but the difference might be too small to care about. –  euphoria83 Dec 10 '10 at 3:40
    
Same as [Integer.toString(int i) vs String.valueOf(int i) ](stackoverflow.com/questions/3335737/…)., which also has profiling results. –  Matthew Flaschen Dec 10 '10 at 3:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

String.valueOf calls Integer.toString, so I guess you could argue that Integer.toString is marginally more efficient.

EDIT: With a modern compiler the calls will be inlined so there should be no difference at all between the two. With an ancient compiler the difference should still be negligible.

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What is the source of this information ? –  euphoria83 Dec 10 '10 at 3:41
5  
Reading the source code. –  Cameron Skinner Dec 10 '10 at 3:41
    
Yeah, I use Integer.toString(int); but today I saw String.valueOf(int); in other developer's code. And I was wondering whats the difference between the two. –  Mudassir Dec 10 '10 at 3:44
3  
1  
@Mudassir: In practice the difference will be completely negligible. The cost of a function call is extremely low, and in this case a decent compiler will probably optimise it away since String.valueOf is a one-line method that delegates to Integer.toString. –  Cameron Skinner Dec 10 '10 at 3:45

Actually it doesn't matter which method you use. But I think Integer.toString(int); is more efficient because, String.toString(int); is internally calling the same method.

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I think that the String.valueOf() method was just provided for the purpose of flexibility, Since the purpose is closely related with String class(in fact for the conversion to String). While the (Integer/Float/etc).toString() method is the authentic method for the purpose of String conversion. You can refer them as slightly overloaded method.

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