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Databases usually optimize queries before executing them. For a query issued using JDBC or a command line client is it possible to see the actual optimized query that was executed by the database. I am using Oracle Database.

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I think you misunderstand - the EXPLAIN PLAN shows you a summarization of what the optimizer sees, not a defacto query:

Rows      Execution Plan
--------  ----------------------------------------------------
      12  SORT AGGREGATE
       2   SORT GROUP BY
   76563    NESTED LOOPS
   76575     NESTED LOOPS
      19      TABLE ACCESS FULL CN_PAYRUNS_ALL
   76570      TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID CN_POSTING_DETAILS_ALL
   76570       INDEX RANGE SCAN (object id 178321)
   76563     TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID CN_PAYMENT_WORKSHEETS_ALL
11432983      INDEX RANGE SCAN (object id 186024)

What decisions the optimizer makes, are based on statistics on the tables involved and any indexes. Refreshing statistics can dramatically change if things have changed enough.

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To be absolutely precise - DBMS often rewrite queries (by removing obsolete parts, like WHERE TRUE OR WHERE a = 1 AND TRUE etc). But indeed, I also think that OP just misunderstands the EXPLAIN. –  zerkms Dec 10 '10 at 5:14
    
What if I am requesting a join in a select query but none of the columns of the joined table are requested and the where clause contains the columns of the join column only for the purpose of performing a join effectively making the join unnecessary. Would the join still be performed? –  Rohit Banga Dec 10 '10 at 5:21
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"purpose of performing a join effectively making the join unnecessary" -- why do you think so? Even if you don't select any fields from the joined table INNER JOIN clause can change the result set. It is not the DBMS business - to think for you: if you don't need a join, just remove it yourself. –  zerkms Dec 10 '10 at 5:24
    
@iamrohitbanga: With respect, that's a different question. But assuming valid syntax, a JOIN is always applied -- the result set reflects that. If there's no data to support the criteria, you won't get anything. That's not an optimizer issue - the optimizer EXPLAIN output can only be reviewed to make the query faster. –  OMG Ponies Dec 10 '10 at 5:25
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@zerkms: actually, Oracle will remove a table from a query if it can guarantee that the result set would be the same without it. –  Jeffrey Kemp Dec 10 '10 at 5:47
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