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I know there an answer in following page,but i can't open it in my country... so, someone kind enough to copy and paste it here. Thanks in advance

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closed as not a real question by cdhowie, James McNellis, Beta, ereOn, Philipp Dec 10 '10 at 8:14

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

I sympathize, but this isn't what stackoverflow is for. –  Beta Dec 10 '10 at 7:44
@Beta Although consequently this page ranks higher than the linked, so.. –  Ollie Ford Mar 19 '14 at 20:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Copy of

In C++, default arguments of global scope functions can be changed easily.

Typically we use a constant expression as a default argument. C++ supports static variables as well as a constant expression for a default argument. We can also redeclare a function signature in a new scope with a different default value.

Default arguments are implemented as global static variables. Therefore, same effect can be achieved if we assign a differnt value to the static varibale. Following code shows this interesting feature.


static int para=200;

void g(int x=para); // default argument is a static variable.
void f(int x=7); // default argument implemented in terms of some static varible.

int main(void)
void f(int x=70); // redeclaring function ::f

f(); // prints f70

g(); // prints g200
g(); // prints g500

void f(int x=700); // redeclaring function f
f(); // prints f700
::g(); // prints g500

::f(); // prints f7 !!!!
// Note that earlier f() call in the same scope gave us f70!!
// This shows that :: (scope resolution operator) forces compiler to
// use global declaration with global signature's default value.

void g(int x=100); // redeclaring function g
g(); // prints g100!!!
std::cout << "para = " << para << std::endl; // prints para = 500
// Note that though value of para is unchaged local scope
// changes value of default argument.
::g(); // prints g500
return 0;

void f(int x)
std::cout << "f" << x << std::endl;

void g(int x)
std::cout << "g" << x << std::endl;

As a programming guideline, if you need to change the value of default argument, either by redelcaring the function signature or reassignment of static variable, you better not make it a default argument and keep it a simple argument.

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For completeness, the expression used as a default value can also be a function call. It can pretty much be an arbitrary expression, the limits are mainly that certain variables are off-limits (for example, locals, other parameters to the function, the this keyword cannot be used in the expression). –  Michael Burr Dec 10 '10 at 7:27
I'm pretty sure you are not allowed to copy blog entries verbatim like this (especially without citing your source: I don't think Sumant Tambe, the original author, would appreciate). –  Luc Touraille Dec 10 '10 at 8:35
@Luc Touraille, I believe you are right! Thanks for comment. I've added copyright. –  Oleksandr Kravchuk Dec 10 '10 at 8:39
sorry,i know it's not stackoverflow for. but i'm in China. is block by our government. i don't known why.. i had bought a VPN account some months ago,so i can read blogspot,but it is also banned recently. I have no idea what i can do. even cache of blogspot on google is block by The Great Firewall in China... –  aztack Dec 10 '10 at 14:28

The gist of it:

1) Set up a static, non-const variable.

2) Set the argument to default to that variable's value.

3) Change the variable's value.

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