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Recently I discovered, to my surprise, that javascript has no builtin support for unicode regex.

So how can I test a string for characters only, unicode or ascii?

Is there a workaround?

Thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I'd recommend Steven Levithan's excellent XRegExp library, which has a Unicode plugin containing various Unicode character classes: http://xregexp.com/plugins/

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Hi there. I downloaded the library but I cannot get it to work. I am testing with the examples provided by the author but I don't get a match. Running unicodeWord.test("Русский"); (found on the author's site) returns false –  Thomas Dec 10 '10 at 12:01
    
@Thomas: it works perfectly for me: jsfiddle.net/timdown/GAKYt. Which browser are you using? –  Tim Down Dec 10 '10 at 14:03
    
Hi Tim. It's working fine. Thanks –  Thomas Dec 11 '10 at 12:05
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Recently I discovered, to my surprise, that javascript has no builtin support for unicode regex.

This comes to a surprise to me as well because

alert(/\u00B6/.test("¶"));

prints true.

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surprise.. same here +1 –  Anurag Dec 10 '10 at 7:58
    
OK. My bad. So what is the correct regular expression to check that a string contains only letters, in every character set? Can this be done? –  Thomas Dec 10 '10 at 8:42
3  
The \uHHHH notation is a JavaScript language feature. Unicode regex support means things like Unicode properties (\p{L}), blocks (\p{InLatinExtendedA}), and scripts (\p{Cyrillic}). JavaScript regexes have nothing like that; you either have to use the XRegExp Unicode plugin, or switch to a different language. –  Alan Moore Dec 10 '10 at 22:31
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Reference: Regular expression to match non-english characters?

This should do it:

[^\x00-\x80]+

It matches any character which is not contained in the ASCII character set (0-128, i.e. 0x0 to 0x80). You can do the same thing with Unicode:

[^\u0000-\u0080]+
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