Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Exception handling is the most useful mechanism to save the application from the crash. Even most of us following the exception handling mechanism. Even I see many of still getting the exceptions. Are we handling the exceptions in a way that supposed to? My question is, What is best way to handle any kind of exception?

I want to make few things clear. When I say handling an exception that does not only mean that capturing appropriate exception message and showing or logging it. Rather, it suppose to handle corrective action for exception.

Lets consider this piece of code:

try {
  someMethod1();
} catch (MyException e) {
  System.out.println(e.getMessage());
} catch (YourException e) {
  System.out.println(e.getMessage());
}

In the above code, "MyException" and "YourException" may not catch all kind of Exception. But, of course we can use "java.lang.Exception". How would we identify the correct exception type? and how to handle that exception? especially when using external libraries.

More detail upon request.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
risky question! –  Yehonatan Dec 10 '10 at 8:37

8 Answers 8

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You do not want to capture Runtime exceptions. The reason being, you are just hiding a bug right there. Instead let the application fail and fix it. To answer to your questions, if you catch Throwable, you are going to basically eat up any kind of exceptions.

Rule of thumb: Only catch application exception.

share|improve this answer
3  
I mostly agree, but I think the rule should be "only catch exceptions you know ho to handle". There are some RuntimeExceptions which it does make sense to catch (especially since many libraries are ditching checked exceptions - JPA, for example). There's even be the odd Error it's possible to handle. –  gustafc Dec 10 '10 at 9:16

Your code is correct. If someMethod1() method does not declare any other Exceptions, they are RuntimeExceptions and you are supposed to catch RuntimeException.

share|improve this answer
    
does it satisfy the any kind of exception? –  Mohamed Saligh Dec 10 '10 at 8:19

If you are using Eclipse, one way is to write the code with out exception handling and it will make you see the types of exceptions that your code might throw. If you want your program sequence to continue as you have coded, then you can surround only that part of code that might throw an exception and in the Catch block perform necessary steps so that your program works in the flow you want.

something like

" code ...

try{ something.... }catch(someException e){ // handle it }

try{ something.... }catch(someException e){ // handle it }

code ... "

However this code does not catch any exception that may occur otherwise (i.e, not because of your code). For that an Outer Try Catch might help you find out that it was something else

like

" try { code ...

try{ something.... }catch(someException e){ // handle it }

try{ something.... }catch(someException e){ // handle it }

code ... } catch(runtime e){ //tell user/log that something unexpected has occured } "

share|improve this answer

The type of any object can be inspected via reflection. But i don't like using it much.

try {
    throw new Exception1();
} catch (Throwable t) {
    // just get name
    System.out.println(t.getClass().getName() + " caught");

    // or try instanceof - this is not nice approach IMO
    if (t instanceof Exception1) {
        System.out.println("yes exception1");
    }
}

BTW did think or heard about AOP? To be more precise about AspectJ. Aspect oriented programming can be answer to your question how to print or log exceptions while your code is still clean and easily maintainable. If you are using Java EE and EJB, you can try interceptors mechanism instead of AspectJ. I recommend you read something about AOP and AspectJ (for Java).

cheers

share|improve this answer

It sounds like you're trying to figure out how to know when you've handled every possible exception. If you just don't put a throws clause on your method then the compiler will tell you which exceptions you need to put handlers for.

share|improve this answer

If you really want to catch every possible exception, catching Throwable is what you want to do:

try {
    somethingThatMayFail();
} catch (Throwable t) {
    t.printStackTrace();
}

More often than not, this is a bad idea, though. You shouldn't catch any exceptions if you don't know why they occurred, or how to clean up after them. Not crashing is not necessarily a good thing - if your program is broken, crashing is the responsible thing to do. Consider this method:

public Thing loadThing(long id){
    try {
        return doLoad(id);
    } catch (Throwable t) {
        // What do we do here?
    }
}

The compiler forces you to return or throw something from every possible execution path of the method, but only the non-exceptional path allows us to return something sensible. We could return null from the catch clause, but then the calling code might forget checking the return value for null, which means you'll instead end up with a NullPointerException which is far harder to decipher since it doesn't tell you what the real error was or where it occurred.

Exceptions are good. There are reasons why every sensible language has them.

share|improve this answer

Guys from Software Engineering Radio podcast had two very good episodes on Error Handling.

share|improve this answer

I don't know if I'm actually getting the meaning of your question, but, you can catch as many expceptions as you need at a certain block of code:

try {
  someMethod1();
} catch (MyException e) {
  System.out.println(e.getMessage());
} catch (YourException e) {
  System.out.println(e.getMessage());
} catch (IOException e) {
   //handle
} catch (SQLException e) {
   //handle
}

And, based on exception hierarchy, when you catch a exception, you are also catching every subtype of this exception, so, when you need to catch every unexpected error condition, you can add a catch for java.lang.Exception (at the last catch statement)

try {
  someMethod1();
} catch (MyException e) {
  System.out.println(e.getMessage());
} catch (YourException e) {
  System.out.println(e.getMessage());
} catch (Exception e) {
   //handle generic unexpected exception
}

You could also catch the super interface Throwable, but it's not recommended, as the only difference is that, aside the exceptions, you will catch the Errors too. The errors are fatal conditions, which should not be handled, as they use to mean serious problems at the java VM, as Out of Memory, Stack Overflow, etc.

These links can be useful on how to handle java Exceptions:

Regards.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.