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Here is a CTE that slows down the whole stored procedure:

select * 
from #finalResults
where intervalEnd is not null
union
select            
    two.startTime, 
    two.endTime,
    two.intervalEnd,
    one.barcodeID,
    one.id,
    one.pairId,
    one.bookingTypeID,
    one.cardID,
    one.factor,
    two.openIntervals,
    two.factorSumConcurrentJobs
from #finalResults as one
inner join #finalResults as two
    on  two.cardID = one.cardID
    and two.startTime > one.startTime
    and two.startTime < one.intervalEnd

The table #finalResults contains a little over 600K lines, the upper part of the UNION (where intervalEnd is not null) about 580K rows, the lower part with the joined #finalResults roughly 300K rows. However, this inner join estimates to end up with a whooping 100 mio. rows, which might be responsible for the long-running Hash Match here: alt text

Now if I understand Hash Joins correctly, the smaller table should be hashed first and the larger table inserted, and if you guess the sizes wrong at first, you get performance penalties due to mid-process role reversal. Might this be responsible for the slowness?
I tried an explicit inner merge join and inner loop join in hopes of improving the row count estimate, but to no avail.
One other thing: the Eager Spool on the bottom right estimates 17K rows, ends up with 300K rows and performs almost half a million rebinds and rewrites. Is this normal?

Edit: The temp table #finalResults has an index on it:

create nonclustered index "finalResultsIDX_cardID_intervalEnd_startTime__REST"
on #finalresults( "cardID", "intervalEnd", "startTime" )
include( barcodeID, id, pairID, bookingTypeID, factor,
         openIntervals, factorSumConcurrentJobs );

Do I need to build a separate statistic on it as well?

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It's not a Hash join, it's a Hash match. It's the duplicate removal for the UNION operator (note, it only has a single input) –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Dec 10 '10 at 11:54

2 Answers 2

I have experienced situations where UNION's made a query much slower than UNION ALL with a DISTINCT afterwards. So while I don't have an explanation for the bad query plan (statistics and indexes are okay?), I suggest that you try the following:

select distinct * from (
    select * 
    from #finalResults
    where intervalEnd is not null
    union all
    select            
        two.startTime, 
        two.endTime,
        two.intervalEnd,
        one.barcodeID,
        one.id,
        one.pairId,
        one.bookingTypeID,
        one.cardID,
        one.factor,
        two.openIntervals,
        two.factorSumConcurrentJobs
    from #finalResults as one
    inner join #finalResults as two
        on  two.cardID = one.cardID
        and two.startTime > one.startTime
        and two.startTime < one.intervalEnd
)
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I already did: it gives the same execution plan as selecting from the original CTE with a option(order group), i.e. it takes the same time as before, it just spends it sorting instead of hashing. –  Christian Severin Dec 10 '10 at 11:44
    
Yep, looking at that query plan, the Hash Match has only a single input - so it's the removal of duplicates by UNION that's causing the issue (and no hints on the join will help) –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Dec 10 '10 at 11:45
    
I see. Maybe a UNION ALL where you make sure not to add duplicate records by using ÈXCEPT might help then, because it would avoid sorting the 580K rows from the first part? –  Lucero Dec 10 '10 at 12:28
    
You gave me an idea, Lucero. Let me check this out... –  Christian Severin Dec 10 '10 at 12:48

Perhaps it will improve if you create statistics for the cardID column.

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