Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a library that will find the square root of a BigInteger? I want it computed offline - only once, and not inside any loop. So even computationally expensive solution is okay.

I don't want to find some algorithm and implement. A readily available solution will be perfect.

share|improve this question
    
Is converting the BigInteger to something that java.lang.Math can use, or does it need to remain as a BigInteger? –  Martijn Verburg Dec 10 '10 at 10:31
1  
600851475143 is the number. Can it be represented by something that Math can use? I couldn't, so resorted to BigInteger. If you were wondering, it is related to a problem from ProjectEuler :) –  user529141 Dec 10 '10 at 11:18
    
Do you mean just one number and once? Then hard code the value computed from say wolframalpha? –  Fakrudeen Dec 10 '10 at 11:45
    
True. But I'd like to know how to do it in Java. I may encounter a problem where I have to find it during run-time :) –  user529141 Dec 10 '10 at 13:22
2  
Project Euler Problem 3 =) I think that number (600851475143) can just be stored as a long (long n = 600851475143L). –  Carl G Dec 16 '12 at 2:10

11 Answers 11

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Both of these code uses Newton's Iteration Rule

share|improve this answer
2  
the first solution (which is on java-examples.com) is an erronous code. It should not be used. It just took me an hour of debugging and finally I found out that this SQRT function does not work properly and when you test it with 300-digit numbers, it has an error, in order 10^4 .which was not acceptable in my application. I don't think anyone should use it for exact and accurate purposes. –  Makan Tayebi Aug 13 '13 at 4:53
4  
Instead, one should use this code: faruk.akgul.org/blog/javas-missing-algorithm-biginteger-sqrt It returns an INT, and omits the decimal part, but the integer part is correct and valid, and the code will be easily modified by those who want to calculate the decimal part as well, by Using BigDecimal instead of BigInteger. –  Makan Tayebi Aug 13 '13 at 5:12

I know of no library solution for your question. You'll have to import an external library solution from somewhere. What I give you below is less complicated than getting an external library.

You can create your own external library solution in a class with two static methods as shown below and add that to your collection of external libraries. The methods don't need to be instance methods and so they are static and, conveniently, you don't have to instance the class to use them. The norm for integer square roots is a floor value (i.e. the largest integer less than or equal to the square root), so you may need only the one static method, the floor method, in the class below for the floor value and can choose to ignore the ceiling (i.e. the smallest integer greater than or equal to the square root) method version. Right now, they are in the default package, but you can add a package statement to put them in whatever package you find convenient.

The methods are dirt simple and the iterations converge to the closest integer answer very, very fast. They throw an IllegalArgumentException if you try to give them a negative argument. You can change the exception to another one, but you must ensure that a negatve argument throws some kind of exception or at least doesn't attempt the computation. Integer square roots of negative numbers don't exist since we are not in the realm of imaginary numbers.

These come from very well known simple iterative integer square root algorithms that have been used in hand computations for centuries. It works by averaging an overestimate and underestimate to converge to a better estimate. This may be repeated until the estimate is as close as is desired.

They are based on y1 = ((x/y0) + y0) / 2 converging to the largest integer, yn, where yn * yn <= x.

This will give you a floor value for a BigInteger square root, y, of x where y * y <= x and (y + 1) * (y + 1) > x.

An adaptation can give you a ceiling value for BigInteger square root, y, of x where y * y >= x and (y - 1) * (y - 1) < x

Both methods have been tested and work. They are here:

import java.math.BigInteger;

public class BigIntSqRoot {

public static BigInteger bigIntSqRootFloor(BigInteger x)
        throws IllegalArgumentException {
    if (x.compareTo(BigInteger.ZERO) < 0) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Negative argument.");
    }
    // square roots of 0 and 1 are trivial and
    // y == 0 will cause a divide-by-zero exception
    if (x == BigInteger.ZERO || x == BigInteger.ONE) {
        return x;
    } // end if
    BigInteger two = BigInteger.valueOf(2L);
    BigInteger y;
    // starting with y = x / 2 avoids magnitude issues with x squared
    for (y = x.divide(two);
            y.compareTo(x.divide(y)) > 0;
            y = ((x.divide(y)).add(y)).divide(two));
    return y;
} // end bigIntSqRootFloor

public static BigInteger bigIntSqRootCeil(BigInteger x)
        throws IllegalArgumentException {
    if (x.compareTo(BigInteger.ZERO) < 0) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Negative argument.");
    }
    // square roots of 0 and 1 are trivial and
    // y == 0 will cause a divide-by-zero exception
    if (x == BigInteger.ZERO || x == BigInteger.ONE) {
        return x;
    } // end if
    BigInteger two = BigInteger.valueOf(2L);
    BigInteger y;
    // starting with y = x / 2 avoids magnitude issues with x squared
    for (y = x.divide(two);
            y.compareTo(x.divide(y)) > 0;
            y = ((x.divide(y)).add(y)).divide(two));
    if (x.compareTo(y.multiply(y)) == 0) {
        return y;
    } else {
        return y.add(BigInteger.ONE);
    }
} // end bigIntSqRootCeil
} // end class bigIntSqRoot
share|improve this answer
    
Great methods. But I have a problem. After some operations with BigInteger I have a "1". That should be no problem at all because of the check you do with BigInteger.ONE, but that's not my case. The method continue and I get the divide-by-zero exception. Is it possible that the value isn't actually 1, but slightly different? On the console I get a "value = 1" so it seems it is correct. –  David Corsalini Feb 28 '13 at 15:54
    
I'm using these to implement this in my project. –  David Corsalini Feb 28 '13 at 15:55
3  
change == to .equals and it seems to work –  Eric Kim Apr 13 '13 at 1:48
    
Does this aproximation has its own name? Thanks. –  GoogleHireMe May 6 '13 at 10:57
    
Yes. I got it (and have used it for decades) from Abramowitz and Stegun's Handbook of Mathematical Functions -- an NBS publication on mathematics. I don't recall a name in the handbook. Wikipedia says it is called the Babylonian method and, alternatively, Hero's method (Hero of Alexandria). According to Wikipedia, it predate's Newton's method by about 16 centuries which makes it older than dirt. It may well predate the invention of fire. It is, or was, perhaps, the most commonly used manual method of calculating square roots with nothing but arithemetic and writing tools. –  Jim Aug 30 '13 at 8:29

Just for fun:

public static BigInteger sqrt(BigInteger x) {
    BigInteger div = BigInteger.ZERO.setBit(x.bitLength()/2);
    BigInteger div2 = div;
    // Loop until we hit the same value twice in a row, or wind
    // up alternating.
    for(;;) {
        BigInteger y = div.add(x.divide(div)).shiftRight(1);
        if (y.equals(div) || y.equals(div2))
            return y;
        div2 = div;
        div = y;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. great answer . :) –  TheLostMind Sep 3 at 6:31
    
Yes, this is a great general solution for any (positive) BigInteger, and it's not slow either. For a BigInteger with a thousand digits it only needs eleven iterations of that loop to get its square root, which seems pretty amazing to me. I wonder why BigInteger doesn't have a square root method as part of its API? –  skomi Sep 18 at 2:19

I can't verify the accuracy of them but there are several home grown solutions when googling. The best of them seemed to be this one: http://www.merriampark.com/bigsqrt.htm

Also try the Apache commons Math project (once Apache recovers from its bombardment after the JCP blog post).

share|improve this answer
2  
Link now seems broken –  Eran Medan Mar 22 '13 at 22:37

For an initial guess I would use Math.sqrt(bi.doubleValue()) and you can use the links already suggested to make the answer more accurate.

share|improve this answer
    
Bloody brilliant. I'm genuinely annoyed I didn't think of that. –  Edward Falk May 29 '13 at 14:34
1  
Actually, I just came up with another way to compute the initial guess: BigInteger.ZERO.setBit(bi.bitLength()/2) –  Edward Falk Jun 5 '13 at 18:44
    
@EdwardFalk This is true but has very poor accuracy, and is much slower because you will have to more loops to get to the same accuracy (it still works, just much slower) –  Peter Lawrey Jun 7 '13 at 5:37
    
Yeah, you're probably right. –  Edward Falk Jun 21 '13 at 3:27
1  
But this is only a viable approach if your BigInteger's value happens to lie within double's range of possible values, right? –  skomi Sep 17 at 3:18

Stumbled upon Big Square Roots in Java.

share|improve this answer
    
Link no longer works. –  jkschneider Jul 12 '12 at 12:12
1  
@jkschneider I've updated the link to point to the wayback machine content for the page. –  MichaelT Jul 27 '12 at 0:26

I needed to have the square root for BigIntegers for implementing the quadratic sieve. I used some of the solutions here but the absolutely fastest and best solution so far is from Google Guava's BigInteger library.

Documentation can be found here.

share|improve this answer

I am only going as far as the integer part of the square root but you can modify this rough algo to go to as much more precision as you want:

  public static void main(String args[]) {
    BigInteger N = new BigInteger(
            "17976931348623159077293051907890247336179769789423065727343008115"
                    + "77326758055056206869853794492129829595855013875371640157101398586"
                    + "47833778606925583497541085196591615128057575940752635007475935288"
                    + "71082364994994077189561705436114947486504671101510156394068052754"
                    + "0071584560878577663743040086340742855278549092581");
    System.out.println(N.toString(10).length());
    String sqrt = "";
    BigInteger divisor = BigInteger.ZERO;
    BigInteger toDivide = BigInteger.ZERO;
    String Nstr = N.toString(10);
    if (Nstr.length() % 2 == 1)
        Nstr = "0" + Nstr;
    for (int digitCount = 0; digitCount < Nstr.length(); digitCount += 2) {
        toDivide = toDivide.multiply(BigInteger.TEN).multiply(
                BigInteger.TEN);
        toDivide = toDivide.add(new BigInteger(Nstr.substring(digitCount,
                digitCount + 2)));
        String div = divisor.toString(10);
        divisor = divisor.add(new BigInteger(
                div.substring(div.length() - 1)));
        int into = tryMax(divisor, toDivide);
        divisor = divisor.multiply(BigInteger.TEN).add(
                BigInteger.valueOf(into));
        toDivide = toDivide.subtract(divisor.multiply(BigInteger
                .valueOf(into)));
        sqrt = sqrt + into;
    }
    System.out.println(String.format("Sqrt(%s) = %s", N, sqrt));
}

private static int tryMax(final BigInteger divisor,
        final BigInteger toDivide) {
    for (int i = 9; i > 0; i--) {
        BigInteger div = divisor.multiply(BigInteger.TEN).add(
                BigInteger.valueOf(i));
        if (div.multiply(BigInteger.valueOf(i)).compareTo(toDivide) <= 0)
            return i;
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
since I am only displaying the integral part, it is the floor of the square root. –  Ustaman Sangat Oct 23 '12 at 4:20

This is the best (and shortest) working solution I've found

http://faruk.akgul.org/blog/javas-missing-algorithm-biginteger-sqrt/

Here is the code:

  public static BigInteger sqrt(BigInteger n) {
    BigInteger a = BigInteger.ONE;
    BigInteger b = new BigInteger(n.shiftRight(5).add(new BigInteger("8")).toString());
    while(b.compareTo(a) >= 0) {
      BigInteger mid = new BigInteger(a.add(b).shiftRight(1).toString());
      if(mid.multiply(mid).compareTo(n) > 0) b = mid.subtract(BigInteger.ONE);
      else a = mid.add(BigInteger.ONE);
    }
    return a.subtract(BigInteger.ONE);
  }

I've tested it and it's working correctly (and seems fast)

share|improve this answer
    
that's short, but it's efficiency is O(nnlog(n)) where n is the length of BigInteger. This is of binary search and multiplying, which works for O(n*n). –  GoogleHireMe Apr 13 '13 at 22:48
    
He also converts back and forth to String. Why? –  Edward Falk May 29 '13 at 1:23

The C# language has similar syntax to Java. I wrote this recursive solution.

    static BigInteger fsqrt(BigInteger n)
    {
        string sn = n.ToString();
        return guess(n, BigInteger.Parse(sn.Substring(0, sn.Length >> 1)), 0);          
    }
    static BigInteger guess(BigInteger n, BigInteger g, BigInteger last)
    {
        if (last >= g - 1 && last <= g + 1) return g;
        else return guess(n, (g + (n / g)) >> 1, g);
    }

Call this code like this (in Java I guess it would be "System.out.print").

Console.WriteLine(fsqrt(BigInteger.Parse("783648276815623658365871365876257862874628734627835648726")));

And the answer is: 27993718524262253829858552106

Disclaimer: I understand this method doesn't work for numbers less than 10; this is a BigInteger square root method.

This is easily remedied. Change the first method to the following to give the recursive portion some room to breathe.

    static BigInteger fsqrt(BigInteger n)
    {
        if (n > 999)
        {
           string sn = n.ToString();
           return guess(n, BigInteger.Parse(sn.Substring(0, sn.Length >> 1)), 0);
        }
        else return guess(n, n >> 1, 0);            
    }
share|improve this answer

A single line can do the job I think.

Math.pow(bigInt.doubleValue(), (1/n));
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.