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I'm trying to puzzle my way through WCF and in my sample app the requirement is to pass a class between my website and my new WCF service.

I don't have a common types dll so how do I pass my object through the service?

My code looks something like this;

Website

namespace HRO_Proof

{

[DataContract(Name = "ThrowAway", Namespace = "http://schemas.proof.com/throwaway/")]
[KnownType(typeof(ThrowAway))]
public class ThrowAway
{
    public Int32 MyValue { get; set; }

    public Boolean SomeFunc()
    {
        return true;
    }
}

}

WCF Service

namespace HRO_ServiceLibarary

{

public class StateService : IStateService
{
    public Int32 SaveThrowaway(object throwAway)
    {
        //Save to DB
        return 0; //Id of inserted record
    }

}

}

I've read a little about a DataContractResolver but I'm not sure how I can implement this.

Any help of direction would be welcome.

Thanks, Mike

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2 Answers 2

In the class mark every member with DataMember. Functions cannot be marked as DataMember.

[DataContract]
public class ThrowAway
{
    [DataMember]
    public Int32 MyValue { get; set; }
}

In Service

public class StateService : IStateService
{
    public Int32 SaveThrowaway(ThrowAway throwAway)
    {
        //Save to DB
        return 0; //Id of inserted record
    }

}

Now if you want to use this service in your website Add Service reference and you should get the Class ThrowAway in the proxy class

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1) [KnownType(typeof(ThrowAway))]: KnownType attribute having the same type as the class itself is useless and implicitly enforced. You don't need it.

2) Parameter type of object must almost never be used for various reason. In fact you need a [KnownType(typeof(ThrowAway))] on the object class but obviously you do not own this class. So get a better abstraction.

3) As Dinesh said, you need [DataMember] on the public Int32 MyValue { get; set; }.

4) If you are using code generation by adding service reference your methods will stay at server and never leave it. But if you distribute your entities (ThrowAway) to your client then they will and it is a good practice. Remember! Separate Interface, entities, and implementation each into separate DLL.

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