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I am working on a project with CUDA. To get the hang of it, I have the following code.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

__global__ void inc(int *foo) {
  ++(*foo);
}

int main() {
  int count = 0, *cuda_count;
  cudaMalloc((void**)&cuda_count, sizeof(int));
  cudaMemcpy(cuda_count, &count, sizeof(int), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
  cout << "count: " << count << '\n';
  inc <<< 100, 25 >>> (&count);
  cudaMemcpy(&count, cuda_count, sizeof(int), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
  cudaFree(cuda_count);
  cout << "count: " << count << '\n';
  return 0;
}

Output is

count: 0
count: 0

What's the problem?

Thanks in advance!

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you should probably work through some of the examples in the programming guide. Your syntax has discrepancies from what is suggested in the programming guide. –  Marm0t Dec 10 '10 at 18:10

3 Answers 3

You should pass cuda_count to your kernel function. Apart from that, all your threads are trying to increment the same memory location. The effect of that isn’t well-defined (at least one write will succeed, but more than one can).

You need to prevent that by only letting one thread perform the work:

__global__ void inc(int *foo) {
  if (blockIdx.x == 0 && threadIdx.x == 0)
    ++*foo;
}

(untested)

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What a failure of mine. Yet, the output it's still wrong. It gives me 1 instead the expected 2500. –  Renato Rodrigues Dec 10 '10 at 12:39
5  
@Renato: this isn’t how CUDA works. See my updated answer: it’s simply undefined to write to the same memory location from different threads. What you want is a so-called gather operation. Implementing this isn’t trivial. –  Konrad Rudolph Dec 10 '10 at 12:41
    
I tried your quick fix but the output was 2. –  Renato Rodrigues Dec 10 '10 at 12:48
3  
Konrad's fix ensures that only threads with threadIdx.x == 0 will attempt to increment the variable, but since you are launching many blocks you will have many threads with that index. Try blockIdx.x == 0 && threadIdx.x == 0. Having said that, it may be worth checking out some of the SDK samples for a clearer idea of how this all works... –  Tom Dec 10 '10 at 14:46
    
@Tom: Thanks, I’ve changed my answer accordingly. It’s been two years since I last used CUDA. –  Konrad Rudolph Dec 10 '10 at 14:49
up vote 5 down vote accepted

I found the solution. I just had to use an atomic function, i.e a function that is executed without interference from other threads. In other words, no other thread can access a specific address until the operation is complete.

Code:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

__global__ void inc(int *foo) {
  atomicAdd(foo, 1);
}

int main() {
  int count = 0, *cuda_count;
  cudaMalloc((void**)&cuda_count, sizeof(int));
  cudaMemcpy(cuda_count, &count, sizeof(int), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
  cout << "count: " << count << '\n';
  inc <<< 100, 25 >>> (cuda_count);
  cudaMemcpy(&count, cuda_count, sizeof(int), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
  cudaFree(cuda_count);
  cout << "count: " << count << '\n';
  return 0;
}

Output:

count: 0
count: 2500

Thank you for making me realize the error that I was committing.

share|improve this answer

The problem with your code is that you're passing to the device kernel pointer to pointer to count. Not pointer to count. One '&' too much

This line

inc <<< 100, 25 >>> (&count);

Should be

inc <<< 100, 25 >>> (count);
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