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The following is a snippet on how to make a java generic class to append a single item to an array. How can I make appendToArray a static method. Adding static to the method signature results in compile errors.

public class ArrayUtils<E> {

        public E[] appendToArray(E[] array, E item) {
            E[] result = (E[])new Object[array.length+1];
            result[array.length] = item;
            return result;
        }
}
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What compile errors do you get? Also, why not just use one of the standard library containers? –  Karl Knechtel Dec 10 '10 at 13:08
1  
Compile Error: I was actually adding the static modifier incorrect.. Using Collections: Yes using a collection would be ideal yet the question is not about collections vs array's, my use case requires an array. –  Chris Johnson Dec 10 '10 at 13:30
    
Note you'll need to use (EVIL) reflection to stop client code throwing an exception in some but not all circumstances (nice). It's best to avoid reference arrays. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 10 '10 at 14:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 70 down vote accepted

the only thing you can do is to change your signature to

public static <E> E[] appendToArray(E[] array, E item)

Important details:

Generic expressions preceding the return value always introduce (declare) a new generic type variable.

Additionally, type variables between types (ArrayUtils) and static methods (appendToArray) never interfere with each other.

So, what dose this means: In my answer <E> would hide the E from ArrayUtils<E> if the method wouldn't be static. AND <E> has nothing to do with the E from ArrayUtils<E>.

To reflect this fact better, a more correct answer would be:

public static <I> I[] appendToArray(I[] array, I item)
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6  
Please also be aware that there is absolutely no relationship between the class-level type variable E and the static method type variable E. I consider it much better practice to use a different variable name when declaring generic methods, static or otherwise, inside generic classes. –  Judge Mental Oct 4 '13 at 3:34
public static <E> E[] appendToArray(E[] array, E item) { ...

Note the <E>.

Static generic methods need their own generic declaration (public static <E>) separate from the class's generic declaration (public class ArrayUtils<E>).

If the compiler complains about a type ambiguity in invoking a static generic method (again not likely in your case, but, generally speaking, just in case), here's how to explicitly invoke a static generic method using a specific type (_class_.<_generictypeparams_>_methodname_):

String[] newStrings = ArrayUtils.<String>appendToArray(strings, "another string");

This would only happen if the compiler can't determine the generic type because, e.g. the generic type isn't related to the method arguments.

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You need to move type parameter to the method level to indicate that you have a generic method rather than generic class:

public class ArrayUtils {
    public static <T> E[] appendToArray(E[] array, E item) {
        E[] result = (E[])new Object[array.length+1];
        result[array.length] = item;
        return result;
    }
}
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Look to another Java generic example with using reflection:


    public class ArrayUtils
    {
        @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
        public static  E[] appendToArray(E[] array, E item)
        {
            E[] result = (E[]) Array.newInstance(array.getClass().getComponentType().getClass(), array.length+1);
            result[array.length] = item;
            return result;
        }
    }
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