Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

A query runs fast:

DECLARE @SessionGUID uniqueidentifier
SET @SessionGUID = 'BCBA333C-B6A1-4155-9833-C495F22EA908'

SELECT *
FROM Report_Opener
WHERE SessionGUID = @SessionGUID
ORDER BY CurrencyTypeOrder, Rank

subtree cost: 0.502

But putting the same SQL in a stored procedure runs slow, and with a totally different execution plan

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.ViewOpener @SessionGUID uniqueidentifier AS
SELECT *
FROM Report_Opener
WHERE SessionGUID = @SessionGUID
ORDER BY CurrencyTypeOrder, Rank

EXECUTE ViewOpener @SessionGUID

Subtree cost: 19.2

i've run

sp_recompile ViewOpener

and it still runs the same (badly), and i've also changed the stored procedure to

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.ViewOpener @SessionGUID uniqueidentifier AS
SELECT *, 'recompile please'
FROM Report_Opener
WHERE SessionGUID = @SessionGUID
ORDER BY CurrencyTypeOrder, Rank

and back again, trying to really trick it into recompiling.

i've dropped and recreated the stored procedure in order to get it to generate a new plan.

i've tried forcing recompiles, and prevent parameter sniffing, by using a decoy variable:

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.ViewOpener @SessionGUID uniqueidentifier AS

DECLARE @SessionGUIDbitch uniqueidentifier
SET @SessionGUIDbitch = @SessionGUID

SELECT *
FROM Report_Opener
WHERE SessionGUID = @SessionGUIDbitch
ORDER BY CurrencyTypeOrder, Rank

i've also tried defining the stored procedure WITH RECOMPILE:

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.ViewOpener @SessionGUID uniqueidentifier 
WITH RECOMPILE
AS
SELECT *
FROM Report_Opener
WHERE SessionGUID = @SessionGUID
ORDER BY CurrencyTypeOrder, Rank

so that it's plan is never cached, and i've tried forcing a recompile at execute:

EXECUTE ViewOpener @SessionGUID WITH RECOMPILE

which didn't help.

i've tried converting the procedure to dynamic sql:

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.ViewOpener @SessionGUID uniqueidentifier 
WITH RECOMPILE AS
DECLARE @SQLString NVARCHAR(500)

SET @SQLString = N'SELECT *
   FROM Report_OpenerTest
   WHERE SessionGUID = @SessionGUID
   ORDER BY CurrencyTypeOrder, Rank'

EXECUTE sp_executesql @SQLString,
N'@SessionGUID uniqueidentifier',
@SessionGUID

which didn't help.

The entity "Report_Opener" is a view, which is not indexed. The view only references underlying tables. No table contains computed columns, indexed or otherwise.

For the hell of it i tried creating the view with

SET ANSI_NULLS ON
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFER ON

that didn't fix it.

How is it that

  • the query is fast
  • moving the query to a view, and selecting from the view is fast
  • selecting from the view from a stored procedure is 40x slower?

i tried moving the definition of the view directly into the stored procedure (violating 3 business rules, and breaking an important encapsulation), and that makes it only about 6x slower.

Why is the stored procedure version so slow? What can possibly account for SQL Server running ad-hoc sql faster than a different kind of ad-hoc sql?

i'd really rather not

  • embed the SQL in code
  • change the code at all

    Microsoft SQL Server 2000 - 8.00.2050 (Intel X86) Mar 7 2008 21:29:56 Copyright (c) 1988-2003 Microsoft Corporation Standard Edition on Windows NT 5.2 (Build 3790: Service Pack 2)

But what can account for SQL Server being unable to run as fast as SQL Sever running a query, if not parameter sniffing.


My next attempt will be to have StoredProcedureA call StoredProcedureB call StoredProcedureC call StoredProcedureD to query the view.

And failing that, have the stored procedure call a stored procedure, call a UDF, call a UDF, call a stored procedure, call a UDF to query the view.


To sum up, the following run fast from QA, but slow when put into a stored procedure:

The original:

--Runs fine outside of a stored procedure
SELECT *
FROM Report_OpenerTest
WHERE SessionGUID = @SessionGUID
ORDER BY CurrencyTypeOrder, Rank

sp_executesql:

--Runs fine outside of a stored procedure
DECLARE @SQLString NVARCHAR(500)
SET @SQLString = N'SELECT *
FROM Report_OpenerTest
WHERE SessionGUID = @SessionGUID
ORDER BY CurrencyTypeOrder, Rank'

EXECUTE sp_executesql @SQLString,
N'@SessionGUID uniqueidentifier',
@SessionGUID

EXEC(@sql):

--Runs fine outside of a stored procedure
DECLARE @sql NVARCHAR(500)
SET @sql = N'SELECT *
FROM Report_OpenerTest
WHERE SessionGUID = '''+CAST(@SessionGUID AS varchar(50))+'''
ORDER BY CurrencyTypeOrder, Rank'

EXEC(@sql)


Execution Plans

The good plan:

      |--Sort(ORDER BY:([Expr1020] ASC, [Currencies].[Rank] ASC))
           |--Compute Scalar(DEFINE:([Expr1020]=If ([Currencies].[CurrencyType]='ctCanadianCash') then 1 else If ([Currencies].[CurrencyType]='ctMiscellaneous') then 2 else If ([Currencies].[CurrencyType]='ctTokens') then 3 else If ([Currencies].[CurrencyType]
                |--Nested Loops(Left Outer Join, OUTER REFERENCES:([Openers].[OpenerGUID]))
                     |--Filter(WHERE:((([Currencies].[IsActive]<>0 AND [Currencies].[OnOpener]<>0) AND ((((((([Currencies].[CurrencyType]='ctUSCoin' OR [Currencies].[CurrencyType]='ctMiscellaneousUS') OR [Currencies].[CurrencyType]='ctUSCash') OR [Currencies].
                     |    |--Nested Loops(Left Outer Join, OUTER REFERENCES:([Currencies].[CurrencyGUID], [Openers].[OpenerGUID]) WITH PREFETCH)
                     |         |--Nested Loops(Left Outer Join)
                     |         |    |--Bookmark Lookup(BOOKMARK:([Bmk1016]), OBJECT:([CashierManagementSystemLive].[dbo].[Windows]))
                     |         |    |    |--Nested Loops(Inner Join, OUTER REFERENCES:([Openers].[WindowGUID]))
                     |         |    |         |--Bookmark Lookup(BOOKMARK:([Bmk1014]), OBJECT:([CashierManagementSystemLive].[dbo].[Openers]))
                     |         |    |         |    |--Index Seek(OBJECT:([CashierManagementSystemLive].[dbo].[Openers].[IX_Openers_SessionGUID]), SEEK:([Openers].[SessionGUID]=[@SessionGUID]) ORDERED FORWARD)
                     |         |    |         |--Index Seek(OBJECT:([CashierManagementSystemLive].[dbo].[Windows].[IX_Windows]), SEEK:([Windows].[WindowGUID]=[Openers].[WindowGUID]) ORDERED FORWARD)
                     |         |    |--Clustered Index Scan(OBJECT:([CashierManagementSystemLive].[dbo].[Currencies].[IX_Currencies_CurrencyType]))
                     |         |--Clustered Index Seek(OBJECT:([CashierManagementSystemLive].[dbo].[OpenerDetails].[IX_OpenerDetails_OpenerGUIDCurrencyGUID]), SEEK:([OpenerDetails].[OpenerGUID]=[Openers].[OpenerGUID] AND [OpenerDetails].[CurrencyGUID]=[Currenc
                     |--Hash Match(Cache, HASH:([Openers].[OpenerGUID]), RESIDUAL:([Openers].[OpenerGUID]=[Openers].[OpenerGUID]))
                          |--Stream Aggregate(DEFINE:([Expr1006]=SUM(If (((([Currencies].[CurrencyType]='ctMiscellaneous' OR [Currencies].[CurrencyType]='ctTokens') OR [Currencies].[CurrencyType]='ctChips') OR [Currencies].[CurrencyType]='ctCanadianCoin') OR [
                               |--Nested Loops(Inner Join, OUTER REFERENCES:([OpenerDetails].[CurrencyGUID]) WITH PREFETCH)
                                    |--Nested Loops(Inner Join)
                                    |    |--Index Seek(OBJECT:([CashierManagementSystemLive].[dbo].[Openers].[IX_Openers_OneOpenerPerSession]), SEEK:([Openers].[OpenerGUID]=[Openers].[OpenerGUID]) ORDERED FORWARD)
                                    |    |--Clustered Index Seek(OBJECT:([CashierManagementSystemLive].[dbo].[OpenerDetails].[IX_OpenerDetails_OpenerGUIDCurrencyGUID]), SEEK:([OpenerDetails].[OpenerGUID]=[Openers].[OpenerGUID]) ORDERED FORWARD)
                                    |--Index Seek(OBJECT:([CashierManagementSystemLive].[dbo].[Currencies].[PK_Currencies_CurrencyGUID]), SEEK:([Currencies].[CurrencyGUID]=[OpenerDetails].[CurrencyGUID]) ORDERED FORWARD)

The bad plan

       |--Sort(ORDER BY:([Expr1020] ASC, [Currencies].[Rank] ASC))
            |--Compute Scalar(DEFINE:([Expr1020]=If ([Currencies].[CurrencyType]='ctCanadianCash') then 1 else If ([Currencies].[CurrencyType]='ctMiscellaneous') then 2 else If ([Currencies].[CurrencyType]='ctTokens') then 3 else If ([Currencies].[Currency
                 |--Nested Loops(Left Outer Join, OUTER REFERENCES:([Openers].[OpenerGUID]))
                      |--Filter(WHERE:((([Currencies].[IsActive]<>0 AND [Currencies].[OnOpener]<>0) AND ((((((([Currencies].[CurrencyType]='ctUSCoin' OR [Currencies].[CurrencyType]='ctMiscellaneousUS') OR [Currencies].[CurrencyType]='ctUSCash') OR [Currenc
                      |    |--Nested Loops(Left Outer Join, OUTER REFERENCES:([Currencies].[CurrencyGUID], [Openers].[OpenerGUID]) WITH PREFETCH)
                      |         |--Filter(WHERE:([Openers].[SessionGUID]=[@SessionGUID]))
                      |         |    |--Concatenation
                      |         |         |--Nested Loops(Left Outer Join)
                      |         |         |    |--Table Spool
                      |         |         |    |    |--Hash Match(Inner Join, HASH:([Windows].[WindowGUID])=([Openers].[WindowGUID]), RESIDUAL:([Windows].[WindowGUID]=[Openers].[WindowGUID]))
                      |         |         |    |         |--Clustered Index Scan(OBJECT:([CashierManagementSystemLive].[dbo].[Windows].[IX_Windows_CageGUID]))
                      |         |         |    |         |--Table Scan(OBJECT:([CashierManagementSystemLive].[dbo].[Openers]))
                      |         |         |    |--Table Spool
                      |         |         |         |--Clustered Index Scan(OBJECT:([CashierManagementSystemLive].[dbo].[Currencies].[IX_Currencies_CurrencyType]))
                      |         |         |--Compute Scalar(DEFINE:([Openers].[OpenerGUID]=NULL, [Openers].[SessionGUID]=NULL, [Windows].[UseChipDenominations]=NULL))
                      |         |              |--Nested Loops(Left Anti Semi Join)
                      |         |                   |--Clustered Index Scan(OBJECT:([CashierManagementSystemLive].[dbo].[Currencies].[IX_Currencies_CurrencyType]))
                      |         |                   |--Row Count Spool
                      |         |                        |--Table Spool
                      |         |--Clustered Index Seek(OBJECT:([CashierManagementSystemLive].[dbo].[OpenerDetails].[IX_OpenerDetails_OpenerGUIDCurrencyGUID]), SEEK:([OpenerDetails].[OpenerGUID]=[Openers].[OpenerGUID] AND [OpenerDetails].[CurrencyGUID]=[Cu
                      |--Hash Match(Cache, HASH:([Openers].[OpenerGUID]), RESIDUAL:([Openers].[OpenerGUID]=[Openers].[OpenerGUID]))
                           |--Stream Aggregate(DEFINE:([Expr1006]=SUM([partialagg1034]), [Expr1007]=SUM([partialagg1035]), [Expr1008]=SUM([partialagg1036]), [Expr1009]=SUM([partialagg1037]), [Expr1010]=SUM([partialagg1038]), [Expr1011]=SUM([partialagg1039]
                                |--Nested Loops(Inner Join)
                                     |--Stream Aggregate(DEFINE:([partialagg1034]=SUM(If (((([Currencies].[CurrencyType]='ctMiscellaneous' OR [Currencies].[CurrencyType]='ctTokens') OR [Currencies].[CurrencyType]='ctChips') OR [Currencies].[CurrencyType]='
                                     |    |--Nested Loops(Inner Join, OUTER REFERENCES:([OpenerDetails].[CurrencyGUID]) WITH PREFETCH)
                                     |         |--Clustered Index Seek(OBJECT:([CashierManagementSystemLive].[dbo].[OpenerDetails].[IX_OpenerDetails_OpenerGUIDCurrencyGUID]), SEEK:([OpenerDetails].[OpenerGUID]=[Openers].[OpenerGUID]) ORDERED FORWARD)
                                     |         |--Index Seek(OBJECT:([CashierManagementSystemLive].[dbo].[Currencies].[PK_Currencies_CurrencyGUID]), SEEK:([Currencies].[CurrencyGUID]=[OpenerDetails].[CurrencyGUID]) ORDERED FORWARD)
                                     |--Index Seek(OBJECT:([CashierManagementSystemLive].[dbo].[Openers].[IX_Openers_OneOpenerPerSession]), SEEK:([Openers].[OpenerGUID]=[Openers].[OpenerGUID]) ORDERED FORWARD)

The bad-one is eager spooling 6 million rows; the other one isn't.

Note: This isn't a question about tuning a query. i have a query that runs ligntning fast. i just want SQL Server to run fast from a stored procedure.

share|improve this question
add comment

13 Answers

up vote 83 down vote accepted

i found the problem, here's the script of the slow and fast versions of the stored procedure:

dbo.ViewOpener__RenamedForCruachan__Slow.PRC

SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER OFF 
GO
SET ANSI_NULLS OFF 
GO

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.ViewOpener_RenamedForCruachan_Slow
    @SessionGUID uniqueidentifier
AS

SELECT *
FROM Report_Opener_RenamedForCruachan
WHERE SessionGUID = @SessionGUID
ORDER BY CurrencyTypeOrder, Rank
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER OFF 
GO
SET ANSI_NULLS ON 
GO

dbo.ViewOpener__RenamedForCruachan__Fast.PRC

SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER OFF 
GO
SET ANSI_NULLS ON 
GO

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.ViewOpener_RenamedForCruachan_Fast
    @SessionGUID uniqueidentifier 
AS

SELECT *
FROM Report_Opener_RenamedForCruachan
WHERE SessionGUID = @SessionGUID
ORDER BY CurrencyTypeOrder, Rank
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER OFF 
GO
SET ANSI_NULLS ON 
GO

If you didn't spot the difference, i don't blame you. The difference is not in the stored procedure at all. The difference that turns a fast 0.5 cost query into one that does an eager spool of 6 million rows:

Slow: SET ANSI_NULLS OFF

Fast: SET ANSI_NULLS ON


This answer also could be made to make sense, since the view does have a join clause that says:

(table.column IS NOT NULL)

So there is some NULLs involved.


The explanation is further proved by returning to Query Analizer, and running

SET ANSI_NULLS OFF

.

DECLARE @SessionGUID uniqueidentifier
SET @SessionGUID = 'BCBA333C-B6A1-4155-9833-C495F22EA908'

.

SELECT *
FROM Report_Opener_RenamedForCruachan
WHERE SessionGUID = @SessionGUID
ORDER BY CurrencyTypeOrder, Rank

And the query is slow.


So the problem isn't because the query is being run from a stored procedure. The problem is that Enterprise Manager's connection default option is ANSI_NULLS off, rather than ANSI_NULLS on, which is QA's default.

Microsoft acknowledges this fact in KB296769 (BUG: Cannot use SQL Enterprise Manager to create stored procedures containing linked server objects). The workaround is include the ANSI_NULLS option in the stored procedure dialog:

Set ANSI_NULLS ON
Go
Create Proc spXXXX as
....
share|improve this answer
7  
This might be the most outstanding self-answer I've ever seen here - thanks for posting the cause and fix! –  SqlRyan Sep 8 '11 at 19:40
3  
Stackoverflow is awesome, that would have taken me so long to figure out. –  DShook Jan 17 '12 at 20:38
    
I still don't understand how turning ANSI_NULLS ON makes such an enormous performance difference. –  Ek0nomik Jul 16 '13 at 16:42
    
@Ek0nomik Because the JOIN clauses inside the view have different meaning when ANSI_NULLS OFF. Suddenly rows match, causing the optimizer to run the query completely differently. Imagine that rather than eliminating 99.9% of all rows, they suddenly return. –  Ian Boyd Jul 16 '13 at 23:00
    
Awesome! Just took my query from 17 seconds to 1! Thanks! –  Dale Burrell Sep 24 '13 at 4:16
add comment

I had the same problem as the original poster but the quoted answer did not solve the problem for me. The query still ran really slow from a Stored Procedure.

I found another answer here "Parameter Sniffing", Thanks Omnibuzz. Boils down to using "local Variables" in your stored procedure queries, but read the original for more understanding its a great write up. eg.

Slow way:

create procedure GetOrderForCustomers(@CustID varchar(20))
as
begin
  select * from orders
  where customerid = @CustID
end

Fast Way:

create procedure GetOrderForCustomersWithoutPS(@CustID varchar(20))
as
begin
  declare @LocCustID varchar(20)
  set @LocCustID = @CustID

  select * from orders
  where customerid = @LocCustID
end

Hope this helps somebody else, doing this reduced my execution time from 5+ min to about 6-7 seconds.

share|improve this answer
5  
THANK YOU!! This was exactly my issue. Wacky. –  Matthew Timbs Aug 23 '11 at 15:14
    
Thanks Adam, this fixed a problem for me. –  Shaun Mahood Oct 27 '11 at 17:02
    
That is some weird stuff. Thanks for sharing that it solved my problem too. –  Carl Mar 1 '12 at 9:13
    
+1 for the link, run into this before and nice to have the story. Would believe this time it was select (@TOP) vs select (@LocalTop) .. really not sure why sniffing could help that one. –  Jens Frandsen Jun 15 '12 at 22:20
    
Solved my problem too, query went from taking 5 minutes to run, to 5 seconds... absolutely amazing/baffling. –  Zoidberg Aug 7 '12 at 13:15
show 6 more comments

Do this for your database. I have the same issue- it works fine in one database but when i copy this database to another using SSIS Import (not the usual restore), this issue happens to most of my stored proc. So after googling some more, I found the blog of Pinal Dave (which btw, I encountered most of his post and did help me a lot so thanks Pinal Dave). http://blog.sqlauthority.com/2007/01/31/sql-server-reindexing-database-tables-and-update-statistics-on-tables/

I execute the below query on my db and it corrected my issue:

EXEC sp_MSforeachtable @command1="print '?' DBCC DBREINDEX ('?', ' ', 80)"
GO
EXEC sp_updatestats
GO 

Hope this helps. Just passing the help from others that helped me :)

share|improve this answer
3  
L.E.D.G.E.N.D. SAVED MY DAY!!!! –  iwayneo Jun 4 '10 at 9:43
    
it saved my day too 3.5 years later :) –  Servé Laurijssen Aug 13 '13 at 8:01
    
This suggestion saved my production environment from losing many $1,000s Thank you so much! –  Yinzara Mar 31 at 19:52
add comment

This time you found your problem. If next time you are less lucky and cannot figure it out, you can use plan freezing and stop worrying about wrong execution plan.

share|improve this answer
    
According to that blog entry, plan freezing is only for MS SQL 2005 and up, so it wouldn't help the OP. –  Coxy Jul 8 '09 at 3:14
    
The problem was it was using the wrong query plan. i wouldn't want to freeze it to the wrong one. –  Ian Boyd Jul 23 '09 at 15:19
add comment

Have you tried rebuilding the statistics and/or the indexes on the Report_Opener table. All the recomplies of the SP won't be worth anything if the stats still show data from when the database was first inauguarated.

The initial query itself works quickly because the optimiser can see that the parameter will never be null. In the case of the SP the optimiser cannot be sure that the parameter will never be null.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there a way to indicate in a stored procedure declaration that i parameter cannot be null? And is it not something that would be fixed by sp_executesql? –  Ian Boyd Jan 13 '09 at 22:07
    
In a word nope, not in 2000. 2005 added a query hint where you could provide an example value for a parameter, the optimiser would optimise as if it knew that parameter was always used. Having said that I've generally found this sort of thing to be a statistics problem. –  AnthonyWJones Jan 13 '09 at 22:14
    
If it's a statistics problem, they does it work fine from QA when i run it ad-hoc, sp_executesql, exec(). And why do they all then run poorly when a stored procedure contains the ad-hoc sql, sp_executesql, exec() ? –  Ian Boyd Jan 13 '09 at 22:18
    
And Report_Opener is a view. –  Ian Boyd Jan 13 '09 at 22:26
add comment

This is probably unlikely, but given that your observed behaviour is unusual it needs to be checked and no-one else has mentioned it.

Are you absolutely sure that all objects are owned by dbo and you don't have a rogue copies owned by yourself or a different user present as well?

Just occasionally when I've seen odd behaviour it's because there was actually two copies of an object and which one you get depends on what is specified and who you are logged on as. For example it is perfectly possible to have two copies of a view or procedure with the same name but owned by different owners - a situation that can arise where you are not logged onto the database as a dbo and forget to specify dbo as object owner when you create the object.

In note that in the text you are running some things without specifying owner, eg

sp_recompile ViewOpener

if for example there where two copies of viewOpener present owned by dbo and [some other user] then which one you actually recompile if you don't specify is dependent upon circumstances. Ditto with the Report_Opener view - if there where two copies (and they could differ in specification or execution plan) then what is used depends upon circumstances - and as you do not specify owner it is perfectly possible that your adhoc query might use one and the compiled procedure might use use the other.

As I say, it's probably unlikely but it is possible and should be checked because your issues could be that you're simply looking for the bug in the wrong place.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I was experiencing this problem. My query looked something like:

select a, b, c from sometable where date > '20140101'

My stored procedure was defined like:

create procedure my_procedure (@dtFrom date)
as
select a, b, c from sometable where date > @dtFrom

I changed the datatype to datetime and voila! Went from 30 minutes to 1 minute!

create procedure my_procedure (@dtFrom datetime)
as
select a, b, c from sometable where date > @dtFrom
share|improve this answer
add comment

Though I'm usually against it (though in this case it seems that you have a genuine reason), have you tried providing any query hints on the SP version of the query? If SQL Server is preparing a different execution plan in those two instances, can you use a hint to tell it what index to use, so that the plan matches the first one?

For some examples, you can go here.

EDIT: If you can post your query plan here, perhaps we can identify some difference between the plans that's telling.

SECOND: Updated the link to be SQL-2000 specific. You'll have to scroll down a ways, but there's a second titled "Table Hints" that's what you're looking for.

THIRD: The "Bad" query seems to be ignoring the [IX_Openers_SessionGUID] on the "Openers" table - any chance adding an INDEX hint to force it to use that index will change things?

share|improve this answer
    
The most useful query hints in that reference are not available on SQL 2000 which is the version in question here. –  AnthonyWJones Jan 13 '09 at 21:59
    
Additionally, what hints are needed? SQL Server is able to figure it out no problem when i run it ad-hoc. –  Ian Boyd Jan 13 '09 at 22:05
    
Sure, and that's always been my experience too. However, in this case, he's saying it's coming up with a totally different exec plan. Maybe there's an index that's utilized ad-hoc, but for some reason is being ignored in the proc. He can force SQL Server to use the index with the "INDEX" hint. –  SqlRyan Jan 13 '09 at 22:12
add comment

I've got another idea. What if you create this table-based function:

CREATE FUNCTION tbfSelectFromView
(   
    -- Add the parameters for the function here
    @SessionGUID UNIQUEIDENTIFIER
)
RETURNS TABLE 
AS
RETURN 
(
    SELECT *
    FROM Report_Opener
    WHERE SessionGUID = @SessionGUID
    ORDER BY CurrencyTypeOrder, Rank
)
GO

And then selected from it using the following statement (even putting this in your SP):

SELECT *
FROM tbfSelectFromView(@SessionGUID)

It looks like what's happening (which everybody has already commented on) is that SQL Server just makes an assumption somewhere that's wrong, and maybe this will force it to correct the assumption. I hate to add the extra step, but I'm not sure what else might be causing it.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Try adding

SET NOCOUNT ON

at the top of your stored proc. Might help a little...

share|improve this answer
add comment

I had the same problem this morning, was very odd, a classic asp page that runs a Stored Proc was taking 1min+. The SQL the asp page was running ran in 2 seconds in MSSMS... Before spending ages investigating the execution plans I thought I would just make a minor change to a SP via ALTER PROCEDURE (inserted a comment line). After running the ALTER statement, the SP executed instantly in both IIS and MSSMS. I am guessing a standard recompile of the SP would have done the trick: (handy info about recompiling here by the way :)

http://www.devx.com/tips/Tip/13386

share|improve this answer
add comment

Rebuilding the indexes on the concerned tables helped me through this problem

share|improve this answer
add comment

-- Here is the solution:

create procedure GetOrderForCustomers(@CustID varchar(20))

as

begin

select * from orders

where customerid = ISNULL(@CustID, '')

end

-- That's it

share|improve this answer
add comment

protected by bmargulies May 20 '11 at 22:47

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.