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I have got a huge xml document.

something like that

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<elements>
 <element id="1" name="france" />
 <element id="2" name="usa" />
 <element id="3" name="Spaïn" />
 <element id="4" name="spain and africa" />
 <element id="5" name="italie and Spâin" />
</elements>

I want to have something like this :

string str = "spain";
XmlDocument xmlDoc = new XmlDocument();                
xmlDoc.LoadXml(myXML);
// Xpath with regex or something very veloce
XmlNodeList xmlNodeList =  xmlDoc.SelectNodes("//element"+ something);  

And the xmlNodeList will contains :

<element id="3" name="Spaïn" />
<element id="4" name="france with spâin and africa" />
<element id="5" name="italie and Spain" />

it must ignore the case
And accent

for the moment I've

XmlNodeList xmlNodeList = xmlDoc.SelectNodes("/*/*[contains(concat(' ',translate(translate(@n,translate(@n, 'aaabcdefghiiijklmnopqrstuvwxyzâÂABCDEFGHïÏIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ', ''),''), 'âÂABCDEFGHïÏIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ','aaabcdefghiiijklmnopqrstuvwxyz'),' '),' "+prefix+" ')]");

where @n = @name and prefix is maybe : "spain" or "Spain" or "Spaïn" and it give me 0 solution

share|improve this question
    
if your filter is something that the user provides then be sure to escape it somehow. If for example the user enters some string containing xpath special characters then SelectNodes may throw –  alpha-mouse Dec 10 '10 at 14:47
    
Good question, +1. See my answer for a more general solution that allows any non-alphabetic characters to delimit any word. :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 10 '10 at 21:09
    
@Christophe-Debove: Thank you for making this problem even more interesting. See my updated answer. :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 15 '10 at 14:54
    
@Christophe-Debove: I have made an exhaustive search and it appears that my solution is probably the only way to solve your problem. In particular, there isn't a way to specify in a RegEx a character class for "all accented characters for A" or for any single, specific character. This means that even using a Regex, all accent characters must be enumerated. Thus, one would not gain anything better than my solution, if he decides to write a RegEx instead. –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 15 '10 at 16:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

UPDATE: As the original problem was changed adding the requirement to recognize the word "Spain" not only in all possible capitalizations but also including accented characters, I have updated the solution below so that now "Spain" with â and/or ïÏ is correctly recognized.

Here is a more generic solution than that of @Alejandro:

If we want to select all elements, whose name attribute contains the word "Spain" in any capitalization and if the possible word delimiters are all non-alphabetic characters, then

This XPath expression:

/*/*[contains(
              concat(' ',
                     translate(translate(@name,
                                         translate(@name, $vAlpha, ''),
                                         '                                                           '),
                               $vUpper,
                               $vLower),
                     ' '
                     ),
              ' spain '
              )
     ]

when applied on this XML document:

<elements>
 <element id="1" name="france" />
 <element id="2" name="usa" />
 <element id="3" name="Spaïn" />
 <element id="4" name="france with spâin and africa" />
 <element id="5" name="-Spain!" />
 <element id="6" name="spain and africa" />
 <element id="7" name="italie and Spain." />
</elements>

selects the following elements:

<element id="3" name="Spaïn"/>
<element id="4" name="france with spâin and africa"/>
<element id="5" name="-Spain!"/>
<element id="6" name="spain and africa"/>
<element id="7" name="italie and Spain."/>

In the above XPath expression $vLower, $vUpper must be substituted with (respectively):

'aaabcdefghiiijklmnopqrstuvwxyz'

and

'âÂABCDEFGHïÏIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ'

$vAlpha must be substituted by the concatenation of $vLower and $vUpper .

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Yes, this is a good solution also, adding the requeriment of removing punctuation –  user357812 Dec 10 '10 at 21:23
    
@dimitre can you have a look of my edit about the accent –  Christophe Debove Dec 15 '10 at 11:00
    
@Christophe-Debove: Thank you for making this problem even more interesting. See my updated answer. :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 15 '10 at 14:54
    
@Dimitre it could work but I'm looking for something more automatic, with your way we cannot avoid to miss some õ è ù or trival(non-latin) caracter –  Christophe Debove Dec 15 '10 at 15:07
    
@Christophe-Debove: Not only "it could work", but it works! As for using this as "automatic" solution -- yes, simply add to the $vLower and $vUpper variables all accented characters in the manner demonstrated in my solution -- there are just a few vowels and each of them has only a few accented variations. Do you mind an XPath 2.0 solution (it might be necessary for you to access a non-standard XPath (2.0) engine, such as Saxon or XQSharp)? –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 15 '10 at 15:29

Use

//element[contains(concat(' ',translate(@name,'SPAIN','spain'),' '),' spain ')]

Edit: Now, the question has changed, but the answer remains...

Just add these changes in the translation pattern like:

//element[contains(concat(' ',
                          translate(@name,
                                    'SPAÂâIÏïN',
                                    'spaaaiiin'),
                          ' '),
                   ' spain ')]

Note: Of course, a more general expression would need a more general translation pattern.

share|improve this answer
1  
yo Alejandro could you explain the use of adding concat? –  Treemonkey Dec 10 '10 at 14:44
1  
@Treemonkey: Yes. contains(@name,'spain') would match "spainly". –  user357812 Dec 10 '10 at 14:52
    
would it still get the element if the name was just name="spain" as there is no spaces? thanks for reply :) –  Treemonkey Dec 10 '10 at 14:59
2  
@Treemonkey: Yes, because the concatenation of leading and trailing space to @name. –  user357812 Dec 10 '10 at 15:01
    
I see thanks for making that clear to me :) –  Treemonkey Dec 10 '10 at 15:05
string str = "spain";
XmlDocument xmlDoc = new XmlDocument();                
xmlDoc.LoadXml(myXML);
// Xpath with regex or something very veloce
XmlNodeList xmlNodeList =  xmlDoc.SelectNodes("//element[contains(@name,'spain')]");  
share|improve this answer

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