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Can anyone explain this (code in global scope)

var a = a || 4 // a exists & is 4
window.a = window.a || 4 // a exists & is 4
window.a = a || 4 // a is undefined error
a = a || 4 // a is undefined error

An explanation of what the difference is between these 4 assignments and why some handle it properly but others don't.

[Edit] this particular example was tested on the V8 Chrome console.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted
var a = a || 4 // var a is evaluated at compile time, so a is undefined here
window.a = window.a || 4 // window.a is simply undefined
window.a = a || 4 // no var a, therefore the variable doesn't exist, = reference error
a = a || 4 // again, no var, reference error

The var statement declares the variable/function in the closest encapsulating scope and sets it to undefined. When there's not var, there's no variable/function declared at all. Therefore the reference error.

Some examples.

function statement:

foo(); // works
function foo() {}

bar(); // TypeError: undefined is not a function
var bar = function(){};

var statement:

function test(foo) {        
    if (foo) {
        var bar = 0; // defined at compile time in the scope of function test
    } else {
        bar = 4; // sets the bar above, not the global bar
    }
    return bar;
}

console.log(test(false)); // 4
console.log(bar); // ReferenceError
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Of course the difference here is an undefined property on an object and an undeclared object. Why is a undefined at compile time but undeclared at run time? –  Raynos Dec 10 '10 at 14:46
    
The var statment declares the variable in the closest encapsulating scope and sets it to undefined. When there's not var, there's no variable declared at all. Therefore the reference error. –  Ivo Wetzel Dec 10 '10 at 14:48
    
Nice one I didnt know a var bar = 0 was defined at compile time in the function scope. Thats why I only need one var statement instead of two –  Raynos Dec 10 '10 at 14:49

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