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I keep reading it is poor practice to use the PHP close tag ?> at the end of the file. The header problem seems irrelevant in the following context (and this is the only good argument so far):

Modern versions of PHP set the output_buffering flag in php.ini If output buffering is enabled, you can set HTTP headers and cookies after outputting html because returned code is not sent to the browser immediately.

Every good practice book and wiki starts with this 'rule' but nobody offers good reasons. Is there another good reason to skip the ending php tag?

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possible duplicate of [why in some scripts they omit the closing php tag ?> ](stackoverflow.com/questions/3219383/…) –  Gordon Dec 10 '10 at 16:03
    
@Christian - You mean that using the output_buffering is lazy, or leaving off the ?> is lazy? –  El Yobo Dec 12 '10 at 12:24
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@Gordon - I don't think it's a dup, the OP knows the ostensible reasons, just wants to know if it is completely resolved with output buffering. –  El Yobo Dec 12 '10 at 12:27
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wouldn't be the first time dated "standard practice" is still around, I still bitch about tab vs space. (Tabs are better, spaces have nothing but idiocy behind them) –  Louis Dec 15 '10 at 23:59
    
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12 Answers 12

up vote 88 down vote accepted
+50

While I can't remember any other reason, sending headers earlier than the normal course may have far reaching consequences. Below are just a few of them that happened to come to my mind at the moment:

  1. While current PHP releases may have output buffering on, the actual production servers you will be deploying your code on are far more important than any development or testing machines. And they do not always tend to follow latest PHP trends immediately.

  2. You may have headaches over inexplicable functionality loss. Say, you are implementing some kind payment gateway, and redirect user to a specific URL after successful confirmation by the payment processor. If some kind of PHP error, even a warning, or an excess line ending happens, the payment may remain unprocessed and the user may still seem unbilled. This is also one of the reasons why needless redirection is evil and if redirection is to be used, it must be used with caution.

  3. You may get "Page loading canceled" type of errors in Internet Explorer, even in the most recent versions. This is because an AJAX response/json include contains something that it shouldn't contain, because of the excess line endings in some PHP files, just as I've encountered a few days ago.

  4. If you have some file downloads in your app, they can break too, because of this. And you may not notice it, even after years, since the specific breaking habit of a download depends on the server, the browser, the type and content of the file (and possibly some other factors I don't want to bore you with).

  5. Finally, many PHP frameworks including Symfony, Zend and Laravel (there is no mention of this in the coding guidelines but it follows the suit) and the PSR-2 standard (item 2.2) require omission of the closing tag. PHP manual itself (1,2), Wordpress, Drupal and many other PHP software I guess, advise to do so. If you simply make a habit of following the standard (and setup PHP-CS-Fixer for your code) you can forget the issue. Otherwise you will always need to keep the issue in your mind.

Bonus: a few gotchas (actually currently one) related to these 2 characters:

  1. Even some well-known libraries may contain excess line endings after ?>. An example is Smarty, even the most recent versions of both 2.* and 3.* branch have this. So, as always, watch for third party code. Bonus in bonus: A regex for deleting needless PHP endings: replace (\s*\?>\s*)$ with empty text in all files that contain PHP code.
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+1 for the regex replace, great tip. ;-) –  Simon May 11 '12 at 8:38
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Point 2 is nonsense, it has nothing to do with security. The redirection is performed by the browser, so any browser can avoid redirecting. If you download the same page with a command line interface (type GET /page.html..) you will see whatever is after the header. If your page sends wrong HTML after the header "Location:" then you have security problems far beyond the ?> closing tag. Not using exit() is the flaw. If your redirect succeeds and you think the browser will stop loading your HTML, you have a security flaw, even if you omitted the ?> –  FrancescoMM Jan 23 '13 at 18:05
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@FrancescoMM, very true. However, if there is an error and the redirect is unsuccessful, the vulnerability will be announced to every public visitor :) This is basically security in levels :) –  Halil Özgür Jan 24 '13 at 5:15
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@HalilÖzgür The vulnerability will be announced to every public visitor, including you :) So there is also a higher chance that you will see the problem and fix the insecurity. So if you are lucky to forget that extra white space (1 on a zillion chance), it actually is safer. It is much unsafer to have a hidden unsolved security problem hiding around! –  FrancescoMM Jan 28 '13 at 10:12
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Worse, apache 2.4.6 with PHP 5.4 actually seg faults on our production machines when there's empty space behind the closing tag. I just wasted hours until I finally narrowed down the bug with strace. Here is the error that apache throws: [core:notice] [pid 7842] AH00052: child pid 10218 exit signal Segmentation fault (11). –  Artem Russakovskii Jun 9 at 5:39
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The reason you should leave off the php closing tag (?>) is so that the programmer doesn't accidentally send extra newline chars.

The reason you shouldn't leave off the php closing tag is because it causes an imbalance in the php tags and any programmer with half a mind can remember to not add extra white-space.

So for your question:

Is there another good reason to skip the ending php tag?

No, there isn't another good reason to skip the ending php tags.

I will finish with some arguments for not bothering with the closing tag:

  1. People are always able to make mistakes, no matter how smart they are. Adhering to a practice that reduces the number of possible mistakes is (IMHO) a good idea.

  2. PHP is not XML. PHP doesn't need to adhere to XMLs strict standards to be well written and functional. If a missing closing tag annoys you, you're allowed to use a closing tag, it's not a set-in-stone rule one way or the other.

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> any programmer with half a mind can remember to not add extra white-space. Even better, any developer with 1/2 a mind can add a pre-commit hook to SVC so that any trailing spaces are automatically deleted: no fuss, no muss. –  BryanH Dec 11 '12 at 22:24
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@BryanH, until you have a file where trailing whitespace is absolutely required, but that's very rare. –  zzzzBov Jan 3 '13 at 14:14
    
You're right, of course. Check out mario's answer for some very cool alternatives. –  BryanH Jan 3 '13 at 21:46
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It's a newbie coding style recommendation. That's why it's typically mentioned in introductory books.

Leaving out ?> can avoid the infamous headers already sent problem. The closing token is not the real cause of that error message. It's extra whitespace after the ?> token which can cause that for certain application structures - namely outputting unnoticed whitespace by including other files.

PHP actually contains some magic to eat up a single \n newline after the php closing token. See The history of PHP eating newlines after the closing tag
There were some early issues of PHP not consuming \r\n. It worked on Windows, but scripts uploaded to Unix servers generated that error. So there's an additional pitfall. Not relevant anymore.

What's nowadays haunting newcomers is mostly unawareness and flaky editors. Most text editors have the habit of adding a newline at the end of files no matter what. That's not an issue, but newcomers often add one too. And obviously it happens a lot that code editing shuffles spaces, tabs and extra newlines after the ?> closing token. (No idea how they do not notice that!)

Therefore I think it's actually good advise for PHP noobs. However it's not really a foolproof way to avoid the aforementioned error. It just delays its discovery, as we Stack Overflowers should know. There are many more ways to trigger headers already sent and newcommers uncover them all. There's the invisible BOM or even HTML and <!DOCTYPE> before <?php, or oftentimes just plain print statments before the header() call.
That's why avoiding ?> is often seen as just a means to avoid explaining basic language behaviour, but not more of a solution than the magic ?>\r\n newline eating.

Solve it automated

Manual babysitting of ?> closing tags is not very contemporary either way.

phptags --warn --whitespace *.php

Or even:

phptags --unclosed includes/

Will do that for you (editor hook, cron job, SCM checkin script). The former also fixes the other potential pitfalls, not only closetag issue. See phptags tag tidier.

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Note to self: blunt phrasing attracts anonymous downvotes. –  mario Dec 18 '10 at 2:17
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Yes, blunt AND provocative phrasing attract downvotes. From what I've read over time, leaving out closing token has absolutely no downsides as long as you don't work with software that can't handle that. Unless you can actually prove that omitting closing tokens is bad and a very noob thing to do, my downvote stays ;) –  Pichan Jul 7 '12 at 16:55
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@Pichan: I'll allow it. But I presume you haven't quite understood what's being told here. Eschewing and avoiding are two different things. And problems half solved are the result of snake oil advise. –  mario Jul 7 '12 at 17:02
    
My upvote. Yes you can add it or skip it. Yes it is mostly a noob problem (but also for very sensitive areas where it might cause unseen problems). The "headers already sent" is really not an issue, once you know it: the interpreter tells you exactly where output started. Like omitting a ; at the end of the line: error -> fix -> ok. Get used to it, so when you meet other people code you know what is happening. Not using it is safer, but if your FTP program or editor adds extra space at end of files, you better know it with an error then go on like that. +blunt AND provocative phrasing is fun –  FrancescoMM Nov 30 '12 at 10:28
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@mario: It's a newbie coding style recommendation. I disagree. The entire Zend Framework omits close tags. I think that's a very personal choice, I really prefer to leave my <?php opened and I don't feel a newbie :) –  Daniele Brugnara Oct 18 '13 at 8:55
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It isn't a tag…

But if you have it, you risk having white space after it.

If you then use it as an include at the top of a document, you could end up inserting white space (i.e. content) before you attempt to send HTTP headers … which isn't allowed.

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If it's not a tag what is it ? –  danip Dec 10 '10 at 16:46
    
Can you please provide an example ? Maybe my php config is whack , but I can't reproduce the problem. –  danip Dec 10 '10 at 16:47
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file1.php: <?php $i = 1; ?> then file2.php: <?php include 'file1.php'; header('Location: http://www.google.com');?> –  Quentin Dec 10 '10 at 17:13
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There are downsides to output buffering as well; it uses more memory on the server (as all output has to be stored in RAM until it's output; without buffering it just goes straight away). It's also ever so slightly slower. Neither of these will be issues in most cases, but I'm lazy anyway, so why not just leave the closing tag off? I use phpcs to ensure that the closing tag is left of every single one of my files and then I don't worry about output buffering :) –  El Yobo Dec 12 '10 at 12:26
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@danip: If you have set the output_buffer flag in the php configuration file, you could not reproduce this problem. –  Jichao Mar 14 '12 at 2:31
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Well, there are two ways of looking at it.

  1. PHP code is nothing more than a set of XML processing instructions, and therefore any file with a .php extension is nothing more than an XML file that just so happens to be parsed for PHP code.
  2. PHP just so happens to share the XML processing instruction format for its open and close tags. Based on that, files with .php extensions MAY be valid XML files, but they don't need to be.

If you believe the first route, then all PHP files require closing end tags. To omit them will create an invalid XML file. Then again, without having an opening <?xml version="1.0" charset="latin-1" ?> declaration, you won't have a valid XML file anyway... So it's not a major issue...

If you believe the second route, that opens the door for two types of .php files:

  • Files that contain only code (library files for example)
  • Files that contain native XML and also code (template files for example)

Based on that, code-only files are OK to end without a closing ?> tag. But the XML-code files are not OK to end without a closing ?> since it would invalidate the XML.

But I know what you're thinking. You're thinking what does it matter, you're never going to render a PHP file directly, so who cares if it's valid XML. Well, it does matter if you're designing a template. If it's valid XML/HTML, a normal browser will simply not display the PHP code (it's treated like a comment). So you can mock out the template without needing to run the PHP code within...

I'm not saying this is important. It's just a view that I don't see expressed too often, so what better place to share it...

Personally, I do not close tags in library files, but do in template files... I think it's a personal preference (and coding guideline) based more than anything hard...

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This is completely false. PHP does NOT translate those tags into XML, and thus no imbalance is being generated. –  Felicitus Oct 22 '13 at 16:00
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@Felicitus: I guess you missed the part that says "I'm not saying this is important. It's just a view that I don't see expressed too often, so what better place to share it..." It's not about PHP translating tags into XML. It's about what happens when a file is interpreted in an XML context (like HTML, or editors, etc)... But point missed... –  ircmaxell Oct 22 '13 at 16:04
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Well, I know the reason, but I can't show it:

For files that contain only PHP code, the closing tag (?>) is never permitted. It is not required by PHP, and omitting it prevents the accidental injection of trailing white space into the response.

Source: http://framework.zend.com/manual/en/coding-standard.php-file-formatting.html

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That tag being "never permitted" is probably a Zend coding standard, but it's not a syntax rule for PHP file formatting. –  Matt Huggins Dec 10 '10 at 17:02
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It's pretty useful not to let the closing ?> in.

The file stays valid to PHP (not a syntax error) and as @David Dorward said it allows to avoid having white space / break-line (anything that can send a header to the browser) after the ?>.

For example,

<?
    header("Content-type: image/png");
    $img = imagecreatetruecolor ( 10, 10);
    imagepng ( $img);
?>
[space here]
[break line here]

won't be valid.

But

<?
    header("Content-type: image/png");
    $img = imagecreatetruecolor ( 10, 10 );
    imagepng ( $img );

will.

For once, you must be lazy to be secure.

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How does that make you secure? It's just a lazy way to fix bad code... –  Christian Dec 13 '10 at 14:40
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That's why I put secure in italic. It prevents you from errors that may cost you a lot of time for a unwanted space after the ?>. secure may not be the good word here. Anyway, it doesn't fix anything (it's not bad code to me to prevent things, an echo here would have been a bad code) but/and it's still valid. Prove me wrong on this. –  Shikiryu Dec 13 '10 at 14:44
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Thanks downvoter with no comment –  Shikiryu Dec 16 '10 at 8:14
    
I didn't downvote you, btw. But my point is compatible with yours. It doesn't fix anything. I never said it's not valid, so I don't need to prove anything. –  Christian Dec 17 '10 at 16:17
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Chouchenos, I bet you meant safe, rather than secure. IMHO a neg for that was too much. Brought you back to square one. ;-) You weren't saying the wrong thing after all. Even PHP development guidelines encourage you to do that. It's in fact much better to rely on closing tag omission, rather than output buffering, for example. The latter would be like setting display_errors to off. Pure Cheating. And a good chance that your app wouldn't be portable. I really think that, as a rule, it's better not to rely on output buffering at all. –  maraspin Dec 17 '10 at 20:01
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In addition to everything that's been said already, I'm going to throw in another reason that was a huge pain for us to debug.

Apache 2.4.6 with PHP 5.4 actually segmentation faults on our production machines when there's empty space behind the closing php tag. I just wasted hours until I finally narrowed down the bug with strace.

Here is the error that Apache throws:

[core:notice] [pid 7842] AH00052: child pid 10218 exit signal Segmentation fault (11)
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Pros

Cons

  • Avoids headache with adding inadvertently whitespaces after the closing tag, because it breaks the header() function behavior... Some editors or FTP clients / servers are also known to change automatically the end of files (at least, it's their default configuration)
  • PHP manual says closing tag is optional, and Zend even forbids it.

Conclusion

I would say that the arguments in favor of omitting the tag look stronger (helps to avoid big headache with header() + it's PHP/Zend "recommendation"). I admit that this isn't the most "beautiful" solution I've ever seen in terms of syntax consistency, but what could be better ?

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"Is there another good reason (other than the header problem) to skip the ending php tag?"

You don't want to inadvertently output extraneous whitepace characters when generating binary output, CSV data, or other non-HTML output.

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I've had a client complain because their XML parser was refusing our output when it had an extra blank line at the beginning. Worse, it was only happening on the one server out of seven with an extra line after the closing tag in an unrevisioned configuration file. –  eswald Jul 3 '12 at 17:03
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If I understand the question correctly, it has to do with output buffering and the affect this might have on closing/ending tags. I am not sure that is an entirely valid question. The problem is that the output buffer does not mean all content is held in memory before sending it out to the client. It means some of the content is.

The programmer can purposely flush the buffer, or the output buffer so does the output buffer option in PHP really change how the closing tag affects coding? I would argue that it does not.

And maybe that is why most of the answers went back to personal style and syntax.

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As my question was marked as duplicate of this one, I think it's O.K. to post why NOT omitting closing tag ?> can be for some reasons desired.

  • With complete Processing Instructions Syntax (<?php ... ?>) PHP source is valid SGML document, which can be parsed and processed without problems with SGML parser. With additional restrictions it can be valid XML/XHTML as well.

Nothing prevents you from writing valid XML/HTML/SGML code. PHP documentation is aware of this. Excerpt:

Note: Also note that if you are embedding PHP within XML or XHTML you will need to use the < ?php ?> tags to remain compliant with standards.

Of course PHP syntax is not strict SGML/XML/HTML and you create a document, which is not SGML/XML/HTML, just like you can turn HTML into XHTML to be XML compliant or not.

  • At some point you may want to concatenate sources. This will be not as easy as simply doing cat source1.php source2.php if you have inconsistency introduced by omitting closing ?> tags.

  • Without ?> it's harder to tell if document was left in PHP escape mode or PHP ignore mode (PI tag <?php may have been opened or not). Life is easier if you consistently leave your documents in PHP ignore mode. It's just like work with well formatted HTML documents compared to documents with unclosed, badly nested tags etc.

  • It seems that some editors like Dreamweaver may have problems with PI left open [1].

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