Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to import data from a CSV file into an existing database table. I do not want to save the CSV file, just take the data from it and put it into the existing table. I am using Ruby 1.9.2 and Rails 3.

This is my table:

create_table "mouldings", :force => true do |t|
  t.string   "suppliers_code"
  t.datetime "created_at"
  t.datetime "updated_at"
  t.string   "name"
  t.integer  "supplier_id"
  t.decimal  "length",         :precision => 3, :scale => 2
  t.decimal  "cost",           :precision => 4, :scale => 2
  t.integer  "width"
  t.integer  "depth"
end

Can you give me some code to show me the best way to do this, thanks.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 128 down vote accepted
require 'csv'    

csv_text = File.read('...')
csv = CSV.parse(csv_text, :headers => true)
csv.each do |row|
  Moulding.create!(row.to_hash)
end
share|improve this answer
2  
Can you show me where to put this code, please. –  freshest Dec 10 '10 at 16:48
1  
You can put it in a Rake task, or in a controller action, or anywhere you like.... –  yfeldblum Dec 10 '10 at 18:33
    
It worked perfectly. However I have a beginner-level question - when I tried to browse described methods in Ruby and Rails API documentation I was unable to find them on place (I looked on official Ruby and Rails sites, API docs). E.g. I couldn't find what object returns CSV.parse(), I didn't find to_hash() and with_indifferent_access() methods... Maybe I looked in wrong place or missed some basic principle on how to traverse Ruby & Rails API docs. Can anyone share the best practice how to read Ruby API docs? –  VKroz Jan 6 '12 at 11:09
    
is there a way to do this without loading the whole file into memory? –  baash05 May 28 '12 at 22:23
1  
@daveatflow: yes, see my answer below, which reads in the file one line at a time. –  Tom De Leu Jun 25 '12 at 14:32

Simpler version of yfeldblum's answer, that works equally well:

require 'csv'    

CSV.foreach(filename, :headers => true) do |row|
  Moulding.create!(row.to_hash)
end

No need for with_indifferent_access or symbolize_keys, and no need to read in the file to a string first.

share|improve this answer
    
This is better for managing large file sizes right? Does it read in one line at a time? –  Simon Sep 16 at 2:00
    
@Simon: indeed. It doesnt't keep the whole file in memory at once, but reads in line by line and creates a Moulding per line. –  Tom De Leu Sep 16 at 8:26

This can help. It has code examples too:

http://csv-mapper.rubyforge.org/

Or for a rake task for doing the same:

http://erikonrails.snowedin.net/?p=212

share|improve this answer

You might try Upsert:

require 'upsert' # add this to your Gemfile
require 'csv'    

u = Upsert.new Moulding.connection, Moulding.table_name
CSV.foreach(file, headers: true) do |row|
  selector = { name: row['name'] } # this treats "name" as the primary key and prevents the creation of duplicates by name
  setter = row.to_hash
  u.row selector, setter
end

If this is what you want, you might also consider getting rid of the auto-increment primary key from the table and setting the primary key to name. Alternatively, if there is some combination of attributes that form a primary key, use that as the selector. No index is necessary, it will just make it faster.

share|improve this answer

The [smarter_csv][1] gem was specifically created for this use-case: to read data from CSV file and quickly create database entries.

  require 'smarter_csv'
  options = {}
  SmarterCSV.process('input_file.csv', options) do |chunk|
    chunk.each do |data_hash|
      Moulding.create!( data_hash )
    end
  end

You can use the option chunk_size to read N csv-rows at a time, and then use Resque in the inner loop to generate jobs which will create the new records, rather than creating them right away - this way you can spread the load of generating entries to multiple workers.

See also: https://github.com/tilo/smarter_csv

share|improve this answer

If you want to Use SmartCSV

all_data = SmarterCSV.process(
             params[:file].tempfile, 
             { 
               :col_sep => "\t", 
               :row_sep => "\n" 
             }
           )

This represents tab delimited data in each row "\t" with rows separated by new lines "\n"

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.