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I have a question about Singletons running within IIS (6,7,7.5) and an ASP.NET 4.0 Web Application (MVC3 app to be specific).

I have a singleton object in my project that is accessed and used in the global.ascx, on the application_start, as well as a few other places within the application.

My concern is, this singleton needs to be accessable at a per instance scenario. However, since IIS is essentially the hosting process, is the singleton going to be the same object across all instances of the application?

If I use the [ThreadStatic] keyword, does it seperate at the Application Pool level?

Finally, is there a way, I can assure a singleton is only a singleton per instance of my application. i.e. if I run my application on 1 website, but inside 5 virtual directories, there is 5 instances of the singleton or if I run my website on 5 different websites within the same application pool.

Hopefully that's clear enough, incase you wanted to see the singleton object, I pasted the general idea of it below.

public sealed class Singleton : IDisposable
{
    [ThreadStatic]
    private static volatile Singleton _instance;
    [ThreadStatic]
    private static readonly object _syncRoot = new object();

    public bool IsReleased { get; private set; }

    public Singleton()
    {
        IsReleased = false;
    }

    public static Singleton Instance
    {
        get
        {
            if (_instance == null)
            {
                lock (_syncRoot)
                {
                    if (_instance == null)
                        _instance = new Singleton();
                }
            }

            return _instance;
        }
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        IsReleased = true;
        Singleton._instance = null;
    }
}
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I'm still confused. Do you know how it works or you don't? Can you make the question a little more clear? –  jcolebrand Dec 10 '10 at 16:53
    
I know how a singleton "works" at a per process level. The question is how IIS will handle it across multiple instances of my application. –  John Dec 10 '10 at 16:58
    
Just out of curiosity, why is your singleton disposable? Do you expect to have periods of time where you want it to be disposed, and then resurrect it again when somebody asks for it? True singletons aren't typically disposed until the application terminates. –  StriplingWarrior Dec 10 '10 at 18:12
    
I believe the OP's question is unclear because he needs to read up on IIS and postbacks. In general a singleton has no relevance in a single postback, but rather across multiple postbacks. So, it's only relevant to discuss singleton's in terms of session/viewstate. Viewstate is very well defined, but complex and configureable elements such as web gardens and recyle times come into play especially since OP mentions w3wp.exe. I believe the OP just needs to readup on these pieces of functionality, but start with the ASP.NET life cycle. Then onto multithreading/apartments/processes. –  P.Brian.Mackey Dec 10 '10 at 18:14
1  
@P.Brian.Mackey: What is unclear about his question? He isn't asking whether the singleton will persist across multiple postbacks, but whether it will persist across multiple instances of his web application. Since IIS runs in a single process, can he expect to have a different instance of his static variable in different application instances? –  StriplingWarrior Dec 10 '10 at 18:54

3 Answers 3

A static value should be static across a particular instance of your web application, so each instance of your application will have its own instance that will be shared across all threads on that instance.

For further reading, see http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/2bh4z9hs(v=vs.71).aspx

Oh, and the ThreadStatic attribute will cause the static value to only be static across a particular thread, so every request would have its own version of that field. It doesn't sound like this is what you're going for.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand that much, it's more or less how IIS controls the instances. Since your application is running under IIS's control, that is essentially the controlling process (w3wp.exe), thus, if we have 5 instances running we have a problem with singletons being seperated between those 5 instances because they are all running under w3wp.exe. –  John Dec 10 '10 at 16:51
    
@John: From the referenced article, "You can run several application domains in a single process with the same level of isolation that would exist in separate processes." So IIS has a single process, but it runs each application instance in its own application domain, so things like class loading will be handled as if each application was a standalone app, completely isolated from the others. –  StriplingWarrior Dec 10 '10 at 16:54
    
So, you are 100% sure that IIS will run 5 different virtual directories in a seperate app domain, even with the same application pool? –  John Dec 10 '10 at 16:56
    
@John: No, I haven't really worked with virtual directories. However, we have several versions of the same web application running on the same IIS instance, and they behave the way I describe. I'm assuming virtual directories work the same way. But it would be easy enough to test: create a very simple app that increments a static counter each time you load a page, set up IIS to run that app in two different virtual directories, and watch to see whether they use the same counter when you load the page from the two directories. –  StriplingWarrior Dec 10 '10 at 17:01
    
I am going to have to do that, only reason I was avoiding is I don't have a true IIS environment right now (only web dev server). However, it seems I am going to have to find one soon, I'll update the post with results and thanks for suggestions. –  John Dec 10 '10 at 17:08

With IIS, you have no control over the thread that your request runs on. If you really need this kind of application instance level locking, you may want to look into the heavier locking objects (Mutex, Monitor, etc) and create one for each application.

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If you absolutely want to ensure that they are separate, you could run each one in it's own Application Pool. That way you'd get a WP for each virtual directory.

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2  
Why -1? Does this not work? If not, I'd like to know for my own future reference. –  Greg Dec 11 '10 at 3:19

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