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If I build a shared library (shared object) I can use it in two following ways:
First way is to use a shared library like I would use a static library.

           #include "myLib.h"
           //...
           //afterwards I can use functions defined in mylib.h
           myFunction();

The second way of using shared library is by calling dynamic loader API functions: dlopen, dlsym, and dlclose from dlfcn.h. I would use shared library in this way when I want to implement a plugin pattern, for example. Listing would look like this:

#include <dlfcn.h>

void  *myLib;                /*  Handle to shared lib file  */
void (*myFunction)();       /*  Pointer to loaded function  */

  //...

  //load shared object
  myLib = dlopen("/home/dlTest/myLib.so",RTLD_LAZY);
  dlerror();

  //get handle to function
  myFunction = dlsym( myLib, "myFunction");
  dlerror();

  //execute function
  (*myFunction)();

  //close lib
  dlclose(myLib);
  dlerror();

Now my first question is: what is the difference between these two usages of shared object in terms of loading time? By using shared library in first way, we're linking/loading shared library to main app in load-time and in the second way we're doing the same thing in run-time?

Second question. What is the name of these two usages? First one is called statically linked shared library and the second one is dynamically linked/loaded shared library?

Third question If I've built a shared library without -fPIC flag (osition independent code), would I be able to use it in a second way?

Cheers

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

These two use modes are typically called implicit and explicit. As you correctly stated the difference in loading is that explicitly linked dynamic library is loaded when dlopen is executed and implicitly linked library is loaded at the time the application is loaded in memory. Each dlopen may take milliseconds to finish, unless library was already loaded, in which case it's very fast, so if you have very stringent latency requirements or need to do frequent loading/unloading then you may decide to make linking implicit or explicitly load the library on program start and don't unload it until it's no longer used.

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If I change a shared library and recompile it, do I have to relink all main applications that use that shared lib if I'm using implicit linking or it's done automatically when those applications load? –  kobac Dec 11 '10 at 17:24

The main difference is in the error handling. Implicit is easier, but if there's a problem (the library is missing or the function is not in the library) the program will fail to run at all. With explicit loading, you can check the dlopen/dlsym calls for errors and if there's a problem, fall back on some alternative.

To answer your third question, it actually depends on the architecture, but on most ABIs you can still load a shared object compiled without -PIC, but it may be slower to load and require more memory.

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If I change a shared library and recompile it, do I have to relink all main applications that use that shared lib if I'm using implicit linking or it's done automatically when those applications load? –  kobac Dec 11 '10 at 17:24
    
@kobac: no -- shared libraries are always linked when they are loaded, either when the application starts, or when dlopen is called –  Chris Dodd Dec 12 '10 at 5:13

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