Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am building this elobrate Logging solution for use in a government setting where things have to be done a certain way. One of the things is that we bubble up untrapped exceptions to the last point in Application_Error in global.asax where when of the things is that we get all the exceptions nested within the exception object and serialize that info to the database. There is code that walks the list. There is not one exception. There could be many nested exceptions. We build ASP.NET apps where we have this extensive bubble up exception logging system. A exception occurs. It bubbles up where another could happen, surrounding the other. It bubbles up to the last point - Application_Error in global.asax where there is all this logic that writes machine info to a database. An exception can occur during this which envelops the other exceptions

In my case, WCF is involved ONLY because the systems involved are in separate zones and WCF is used to communicate. and you CANNOT serialize/pass an .NET Exception object across the service boundary so I have defined a C# class/Data Structure to represent exceptions:

[DataContract]
public class ExceptionStructure
{
    [DataMember]
    public string Message { get; set; }

    [DataMember]
    public string StackTrace { get; set; }

    [DataMember]
    public List<ExceptionStructure> InnerException { get; set; }
}

First, Whoa, this structure may not work since InnerException is READ ONLY so I need help on a new class as well. I need only the Message and StackTrace fields as well as InnerExceptions.

All I need help on is given an .NET exception object that may or may not have inner exceptions, can someone help me write the code that will populate one of these ExceptionStructure classes?

Also, code to deserialize one of these into a list of .NET exceptions on the other side would be nice? If you see a better structure idea, feel free.

share|improve this question
1  
Should InnerException not be of type ExceptionStructure instead of List<ExceptionStructure>? The inner exception can, after all, have its own inner exception as well. Also, you probably want to store the exception type in addition to the message. –  Luke Hutteman Dec 10 '10 at 21:39
    
The system has to gather exceptions on the way as it bubbles up and nest them as Inner Exceptions. I need some way of representing that. –  Sam Gentile Dec 10 '10 at 23:00
    
In other words, loop until InnerExceptions = null. –  Sam Gentile Dec 10 '10 at 23:10
    
@Sam: could you provide an example of what you mean by gathering exceptions as they bubble up? Are you saying that exceptions are being progressively wrapped as they traverse the call stack? –  John Saunders Dec 11 '10 at 0:37
    
yes that is corect –  Sam Gentile Dec 11 '10 at 0:40

2 Answers 2

Are you familiar with WCF faults ? You can use them to wrap exceptions and send them over the WCF wire:

[ServiceContract]
public interface ICalculator
{
    [OperationContract]
    [FaultContract(typeof(DivideByZeroException))]
    int Divide(int n1, int n2);
}

public Calculator : ICalculator
{
    int Divide(int n1, int n2)
    {
        try
        {
            return n1/n2;
        }
        catch (DivideByZeroException ex)
        {
            throw new FaultException<DivideByZeroException>(ex);
        }
    }
}

EDIT: In your case, since you are talking about a collection of exceptions, you could try faulting with an AggregateException

share|improve this answer
    
I am and we are using them for one part of the solution. This is different. –  Sam Gentile Dec 10 '10 at 23:54
    
Different because of the aggregation of exceptions? If so, see my edit –  Ohad Schneider Dec 11 '10 at 0:16
    
Nope. Look, I can't explain the security implications of the system and the DMZ and what systems are where. I just need an answer to the algorithm posed above. –  Sam Gentile Dec 11 '10 at 0:24

Most, if not all, exceptions can be serialized using .NET Runtime Serialization (BinaryFormatter, SoapFormatter). Why not serialize the exception into a byte array, send the byte array across the wire using WCF, then deserialize back into exception instances on the other side?

This will highlight the fact that this agency has chosen to depend on all exceptions always being serializable, but maybe that's ok.

share|improve this answer
    
There is not one exception. There could be many nested exceptions. We build ASP.NET apps where we have this extensive bubble up exception logging system. A exception occurs. It bubbles up where another could happen, surrounding the other. It bubbles up to the last point - Application_Error in global.asax where there is all this logic that writes machine info to a database. An exception can occur during this which envelops the other exceptions. –  Sam Gentile Dec 11 '10 at 1:42
    
The only reason WCF is involved this time is that the ASP.NET system is outside the DMZ and is a client of the system inside the safe zone that contains Repositories and the database exposed via the WCF services. I am already using FaultContracts to capture exceptions that occur on the safe side. That's the first pass. –  Sam Gentile Dec 11 '10 at 1:46
    
In that first pass, for security reasons, we can't leak out connection info and other exception info across the boundary. So we log it on the safe side. Pass 2, an exception occurs in the unsafe ASP.NET app side. The database for logging is inside the DMZ so there is an error logging service that this question is part of. I need to get that nested exception back over to log to the database along with all this machine info. –  Sam Gentile Dec 11 '10 at 1:50
    
So, I just need a way to describe exceptions to get across the boundary in this error logging system. The other side already has these classes and methods to log exception info to the database or error log or file system. I just need a class/structure like above and an algorithm to poupulate it. Please. –  Sam Gentile Dec 11 '10 at 1:53
    
@Sam, what does Application_Error see? A single Exception containing an InnerException that contains an InnerException, etc? Or maybe some of the exceptions contain a list of Exception instances? Doesn't matter. Serialize it and send it over, then deserialize it on the other side. The other side logs exceptions, right? Good: send them exceptions to log. –  John Saunders Dec 11 '10 at 3:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.